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Old 10-29-2012, 06:07 AM   #101
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IMHO ... and I AM saying humble... I would go with the bigger container for primary. I always find it a pain to deal with even a blow off that leaks yeast/krausen into the blow-off container, much less having to keep swapping airlocks and clean the mess up when it ferments over.

If you have the larger container, why not just use it for primary? You can then use the smaller glass carboy for secondary (if adding fruit or something) or you can use it to do a smaller batch of something else.

Keep in mind this is assuming you're doing 5+ gallon batches. Just my 2 cents.

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Old 10-29-2012, 01:28 PM   #102
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I agree, a person can use the bigger container for the primary as there will be lots of C02 being produced to push out any oxygen in the container. But, if a person was going to do a secondary, they'd want as little head space in the container as possible because there is less C02 being produced and you want as little oxygen as possible in the fermenter.

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Old 01-10-2013, 07:52 AM   #103
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Why not just tie a microfiber hops bag to the end of the siphon? That will certainly prevent any yeast cake from entering a bottle or keg.

I've only done a handful of brews. They've all been great. The first brew I skipped secondary because I wanted to bottle before I had to leave town. (I was visiting my pops for 2 weeks.) The brew turned out great, I was careful with the syphon and I hardly had any yeast cake issues.

I'm an avid cook and am really getting into home brewing. I know as a cook I trust my instincts. Most cooks don't even measure quantities yet they make fabulous meals. That comes with experience and intuition on what steps and ingredients give you what flavors you want. It also puts your own spin on things.

Now with all the extra precautions we all take to keep everything sanitary, secondary fermentation always seemed like a risk and not necessary. I've done it both ways, and I prefer a long primary. Now here is a newbie question. I currently have a Dark Choc-lately Irish Stout with some specialty grains that is in primary. This is an extract/specialty grains hybrid not all grain. Most of the talk has been about beers you can see through. Does this skipping the secondary period apply to stouts and non all grain brews as well?

I plan on waiting 3 weeks, priming the primary container and just putting a microfiber hops bag on the end of my syphon, or just use a strainer like mentioned before. I'll carefully stir the wort so I don't scrape the yeast on the bottom with the stirrer. Sound good?

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Old 01-10-2013, 09:13 AM   #104
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dannylerch View Post
I'll carefully stir the wort so I don't scrape the yeast on the bottom with the stirrer. Sound good?
Why would you stir the wort before racking it?
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Old 01-10-2013, 05:23 PM   #105
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to ensure my priming sugar has mixed well with the wort

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Old 01-10-2013, 05:36 PM   #106
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to ensure my priming sugar has mixed well with the wort
Most people mix the priming sugar and beer together in the bottling bucket or keg. Some people bottle straight from the fermenter, but they usually add the sugar directly to the bottles in that case. I've never heard of adding the sugar directly to the fermenter. I'd be afraid that the denser priming sugar solution would sink to the bottom and a lot of it would end up staying in the trub.
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Old 01-10-2013, 05:48 PM   #107
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I'll just transfer to a bottling bucket then. thanks!

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Old 01-10-2013, 07:35 PM   #108
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Why not just tie a microfiber hops bag to the end of the siphon? That will certainly prevent any yeast cake from entering a bottle or keg.
Somebody please correct me if i'm wrong, but i seem to remember reading that using something to strain the beer at that point in the process could possibly lead to oxidation. Something to consider.
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Old 01-11-2013, 03:42 AM   #109
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Default Hey Interesting

Thanks for the Info it has been a while for me guess I was in the time, we where taught to use secondary. After reading not sure any more I know one thing In life, there's not Just one way to skin a cat. So If you don't try_ you can't say it works or it don't work. And The beer I brew is the best to ME, LOL





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To avoid fighting, both approaches work.

My own experience:
I use a primary only, but it's glass. Since I do wine as well as beer, I only have 6 gallon carboys. I don't own a 5 gallon carboy anymore(last one broke). I just brew the beer in the 6 gallon carboy as a primary for 3-4 weeks, then keg and/or bottle. Makes clean tasting beer!

Lot's of headspace without CO2 production equals exposure to O2. During active fermenting, a lot of CO2 is given off, and it protects the beer. Keeping the beer in primary the whole time under airlock does that for you. The O2 gets pushed out, while the CO2 blankets the beer. When a secondary is used, typically it's moved while still fermenting(1 week) so that there is still some CO2 production, and into 5 gallon containers so there is less headspace = less O2.

In winemaking, when we go to secondary, which is AFTER almost all fermentation is complete, we "top up" within a couple of inches of the neck(when using carboys). As we sometimes leave the wine in a long time and rack multiple times over several months, we try to minimize O2 exposure as much as possible. Like with beer, O2 is great to get the yeast started, but not good when the yeast are done.

Extra racking can cause more O2 to get into beer. This is one of the several reasons many people have chosen to stay in primary only. It's easier, there is less O2 exposure, there is less cleaning/sterilizing, and it produces good beer. We used to think you needed to do 2-stage to get quality beer. As one who has brewed off and on since the 70's, I've seen many myths get broken and I think this is one. I think perhaps the yeast wasn't as clean back then, and we also didn't leave the beer in long enough (at least I didn't).

But both techniques can produce award winning beer, if one is careful and uses common sense. With single stage, you should leave it in long enough to clear, and rack more carefully off the sediment. With two stage, you need to pay attention to the increased opportunity for O2 exposure due to the extra racking. Good beer is good beer, no matter how you get there.

RDWHAHB,

Rich
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Old 01-11-2013, 05:58 AM   #110
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oh no, not this topic again

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