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Old 03-01-2011, 12:22 AM   #1
Lgaddy44
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Default Rushing into All Grain?

I'm new to home brewing, only a couple months in, but of course, it's consuming my every free thought. I've completed a couple extracts, will be doing my second partial mash this weekend, and I'm exploring the possibilities of jumping into an all grain (possibly too soon?).

I've watched a ton of videos on youtube and have also read up a good bit on all grain methods. I'm feeling fairly confident that I'd like to at least give it a shot. The problem is, I live in an apartment, with limited working space, and no ability to cook outside with a 30qt pot and propane burner.

I'm thinking...I've got what I think is about a 10 gallon Coleman cooler I can convert into a mash tun. Split the difference for my mash water volume between (2) 4-5 gallon pots on the electric stove. Bring the water to temp, mash in the cooler, and heat up my sparge water in the same fashion. Vorlauf, sparge as directed, and split the wort between my (2) pots on the stove for the boil.

I could split the hop additions equally between the two pots, chill, and combine both pots of wort into my primary at the end. Shake up the carboy, pitch the yeast, and voila!

I feel like this is a dumb question, because it really does make sense to me, but I would greatly appreciate some feedback, and please, feel free to let me know if anyone has tried or currently uses this method.



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Old 03-01-2011, 12:25 AM   #2
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http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f39/easy-stovetop-all-grain-brewing-pics-90132/

Have you read through that thread? There's some good advice and techniques there. DeathBrewer also has a thread on partial mash brewing, which I would recommend trying before going all grain. Obviously, it's not a necessity to do PMs first but it can give you a better perspective on AG if you're unsure about jumping right in.


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Old 03-01-2011, 12:54 AM   #3
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Jump on in. It's not much harder and gives you a more of a "from scratch" feel to homebrewing. I brewed 3 extract batches then went allgrain from there.

I was all self tought so I'm sure I have some bad habits, but still produce beer I love to drink. I have actually never watched someone brew that I have not tought. So you really can get the process down just by reading a little.

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Old 03-01-2011, 01:07 AM   #4
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i recently started doing all grain on the stove top. i cant boil more than 4 gallons, i dont guzzle tons of beer, and i like to experiment. so my answer was to do 3 gallon batches. i have a mashtun, and my 5 gallon boil kettle and it works great. it gets your "per batch" cost down quite a bit too. learn to harvest yeast and you can brew a batch for under $10.

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Old 03-01-2011, 01:15 AM   #5
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Go all grain and never look back... I've never used extract, but t seems like I might as well go get a six pack from the grocery store if I were brewing with powder and syrup... All grain is great, and I can;t imagine doing it any other way.

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Old 03-01-2011, 01:24 AM   #6
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I'm new to all grain as well, but I don't think I'll go back to extract now that I jumped into the deep end. There are a lot of people here that do the same thing your talking about. I dug around on this forum and got every answer I needed to make great beer. Take a look at the DIY section and you can build everything you need.

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Old 03-01-2011, 01:26 AM   #7
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I jumped into all-grain from brew number 1. It came out so-so, drinkable but not great.
I knew what my mistakes were. I fixed the mistakes and they've been coming out good since. I owe that to a lot of good advice here.
I also split batches on the stove for winter, on account of I'm a cold weather pansey. Works fine.
I say go for it, and if the first doesn't come out quite right, keep going. I love the process as much as the beer.

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Old 03-01-2011, 01:39 AM   #8
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Agreed!

I went all grain for my second ever batch. Its really not that big of a step! I did the same thing you did, watched all the youtube videos, researched....made a DIY chiller and converted a cooler into a mash tun. It was easy, and much more satisfying!

You are ready. Just do it!

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Old 03-01-2011, 02:13 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by snazzy View Post
Jump on in. It's not much harder and gives you a more of a "from scratch" feel to homebrewing. I brewed 3 extract batches then went allgrain from there.

I was all self tought so I'm sure I have some bad habits, but still produce beer I love to drink. I have actually never watched someone brew that I have not tought. So you really can get the process down just by reading a little.
This. I brewed two extract batches and then immediately bought a 10 gal Rubbermaid mash tun and jumped into AG. Never looked back. I do a single temp infusion mash and a batch sparge. It's ridiculously easy. I don't know why people think it's so hard, it's not. Add grain to cooler, add hot water, stir every 15 minutes for an hour, drain, add sparge water, stir, drain, done. The first one you do you'll probably make some minor mistakes, but by the end of the second batch you'll be an old pro.
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Old 03-01-2011, 03:34 AM   #10
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do it. go all grain. spent almost a year messing with extract, and while i made some great beer, wish i had gone all grain sooner. why not just brew 2 or 3 gallon batches which you could handle doing with your space constraints? I have a buddy who does nothing but 2.5 gallon batches, it might not be a ton of beer, but it allows him to brew alot more often which I think for the most of us is more than half the enjoyment! DO IT! A nice nice all grain setup can be head for around a hundred dollars if you shop around...



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