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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing > Question About Dennybrew Mash
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Old 01-21-2012, 05:24 PM   #1
Blueman89
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Default Question About Dennybrew Mash

Doing my first mash tomorrow and have a question. I'm following the batch sparge method on the dennybrew site and everything makes sense. My question is about the infusion before first runoff. He doesn't mention heating the extra gallon or so of water, but I'm assuming I'd want it to be at the mash temp. Thus if mashing at 154, add the extra water at 154 correct?

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Old 01-21-2012, 05:32 PM   #2
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If you're talking about Mashout infusion, then you'll want to add water that's close to or at boiling to bring up the temp of the mash to 168 before draining. Or alternatively, you can just drain it out as is and add you 1st sparge water water at just below boiling to bring the mash up to 168. I'm not sure which is better but I think you get better efficiency with the second method. And you need less volume in your mash tun if you do the second method.

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Old 01-21-2012, 05:33 PM   #3
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The infusion before draining is the mash out. It is intended to raise the temps enough to denature or stop the enzymes from working. This would require water of about 179 or 180 degrees F. It is usually no necessary to add this infusion. I never do. Hope this helps. Mark

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Old 01-21-2012, 05:44 PM   #4
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The step he's talking about is to make both runnings equal in volume and account for grain absorption. So I'll need almost a gallon. Even at 212 will that really raise the temp enough to be a real mashout?

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Old 01-21-2012, 05:55 PM   #5
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Even if it doesn't get you quite to real mash out temps, it'll make your mash less viscous and it'll drain better. I do a batch sparge and top off the mash with boiling water, stir it up, and let it sit for a few minutes before vorlauf and draining.

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Old 01-21-2012, 06:13 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LuiInIdaho View Post
The infusion before draining is the mash out. It is intended to raise the temps enough to denature or stop the enzymes from working. This would require water of about 179 or 180 degrees F. It is usually no necessary to add this infusion. I never do. Hope this helps. Mark
Yeah, I've pretty much stopped doing it, too. For one thing, it's not necessary to denature the enzymes since you reach the boil so quickly by batch sparging. For another, it's much easier to just increase the mash volume to get 1/2 your total boil volume from the mash. And I'm all about easy. I need to update that web page!
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Old 01-21-2012, 06:13 PM   #7
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Thanks everyone. And a big thanks to Denny. Your page was the first to make complete sense of the process for me.

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Old 03-29-2012, 03:10 AM   #8
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Bumping this to get some sparging ideas on an upcoming brew. I am trying to hone in on my sparge techniques. I've fly sparged a few times but hate the time it adds to my brew day....although i did get better eff.
Historically I've batch sparged but the dennybrew technique is new to me and I'd like to try it out.
As far as batch sparging goes; In the past I collected my first running and added ALL of my sparge water to the tun. Let it sit for 20 minutes then drain to kettle after recirculating to get to pre boil amounts. ( usually 7 gallons)

Is there a calculator for dennybrew that may help me out?

My next recipe calls for a total grain bill of 10.5lbs.
I use a 10 gallon Igloo cooler with false bottom and have a 10 gallon kettle to brew

Looking for assistance with water amounts and temps using denny brew. Any help is appreciated!!

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Old 03-30-2012, 05:11 PM   #9
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It's easy, but first of all, stop wasting time waiting after adding the sparge water. Waiting does nothing but waste time. Now, as to sparge volume...until you have enough experience to be able to calculate the amount, use the empirical method. Mash using whatever ratio you like...I usually use 1.65-1.75 qt./lb. After you runoff the msh, measure how much wort you have. Subtract that from the total boil volume you;re looking for. The answer you get is how much sparge water to use. Feel free to contact me if you need any more info.

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Old 03-30-2012, 05:34 PM   #10
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I have seen you say to up the water to grain ratio to avoid the infusion however I have read other people say this might affect the wort and make it "thin" so to speak. Have you noticed this happen with your beers at all?

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