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Old 04-28-2012, 09:53 AM   #1
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Default Protein Rest Question

I am planning on brewing a Raspberry Wheat in a couple of weeks and I have been reading up on protein rests for the wheat malt to get my game plan together. I have never done a protein rest before, so here is the question: Is it smarter to do a protein rest on just the wheat malt and add in the rest of the 2-Row and hot water to bring up to saccrification rest temp or to do the protein rest with all the grains at the same time then bring to mash temp? I'm using 5#Rahr White Wheat Malt and just over 4# Rahr 2-Row and want to get the most out of the mash as possible without compromising body. Cheers!



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Old 04-28-2012, 10:11 AM   #2
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I've never heard of doing a protein rest by splitting the grains. You would mash as normal except at a lower temp for period of time, then raise the temp to your normal mash temp for another period of time. (can you tell I'm at work and don't have my books here? You'll have to look up the temp/times.)
That said.... most people (not all) feel that with today's highly modified grains, even wheat, a protein rest is not needed and MOST people (again, not all) would not be able to tell the difference between a well made beer using either method. A lot of REALLY GOOD homebrewers don't feel the extra effort of a step mash is worth it.

That said, Go for it and see what it does for your beer. Let us know how it goes.



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Old 04-30-2012, 02:47 PM   #3
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I've done split grain additions where I add extra grains after a protein rest. The only tricky part is the mash will cool a bit when you add the extra grain.

Me personally, am part of the minority that still likes to do protein rests. We've all heard that too long of a protein rest can result in a thin beer. So that really does tell us that protein is very important to the body of a beer yet most people don't fiddle with it. My analogy is that that would be the equivalent to adjusting the sound of your stereo with just the bass knob (starch conversion temp) and ignoring the treble knob (messing with protein too). Sure it works, but you can do more when you mess with both

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Old 04-30-2012, 03:02 PM   #4
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pjj2bs, what temp do you typically do your protein rests at? I've heard that with today's highly modified malts, you should do it up around 130º as opposed to 122º. Do you just do it for 15 minutes?

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Old 04-30-2012, 03:12 PM   #5
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For pilsner malt heavy beer I like to do 20 min. at 122. A number of people will do low 130's.

I am going to try 132 with some pale malt soon and see what I get. No rest, just mash in at 132 and then ramp up to my final temp. Just trying to tweak a little more body out of the malt.

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Old 04-30-2012, 04:58 PM   #6
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This brings up another more generic step mash question. I was reading an old brewing techniques article and the author talked about putting hot tap water in the mash tun then douging in and turning on heat until you get to your first rest temp (protien rest in this case). What is the disadvantage of doing this? Will you lose more body and end up with thin beer? With an automated system it would remove the strike temp calculation from the process and simplify things a little bit. It would also remove the issue of starting out too hot if you miss the strike temp.

PS - don't mean to hijack the OP's thread....

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Old 04-30-2012, 05:33 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Patirck View Post
This brings up another more generic step mash question. I was reading an old brewing techniques article and the author talked about putting hot tap water in the mash tun then douging in and turning on heat until you get to your first rest temp (protien rest in this case). What is the disadvantage of doing this? Will you lose more body and end up with thin beer? With an automated system it would remove the strike temp calculation from the process and simplify things a little bit. It would also remove the issue of starting out too hot if you miss the strike temp.

PS - don't mean to hijack the OP's thread....
Take a look at this "enzyme chart" from John Palmer: http://howtobrew.com/section3/chapter14-1.html

I'm not sure why the phytase rest is no longer done, and I never do an acid rest myself. I do occasionally do protein rests, especially with pilsner malt, and I do them on the high end- at 131-133F.
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Old 04-30-2012, 05:36 PM   #8
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Splitting the grains might be an option, if you so choose, but I have personally never tried it. I have always had good success/flavor/body using a protein rest @ 122-125 for 15-20 min (Beersmith has the step for 30, but I don't mash at this temp for that long). Splitting your grains sounds like splitting hairs, and sounds like you're just adding more work to the process. Stick with the basic protein rest and step up to your normal mash temp and you should be good to go!

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Old 05-01-2012, 09:12 AM   #9
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Thanks for your feedback. I am going to be brewing this morning and I will have the entire grain bill in for both the protein rest and sacc rest. I don't want to add extra work if I don't have to. Pre-boil gravity readings should be able to tell me if this was effective or not. That being said, however, although this time around I am doing a raspberry wheat, I plan to use the base recipe again for an American Hefe in the future. I can try a split grain protein rest on that one and see if there is any difference in the final product. After all, much of this common hobby of ours is experimenting to find what works best. I will, of course, let y'all know how this mornings brew session went to see if it paid off. Cheers!

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Old 05-01-2012, 01:06 PM   #10
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I was reading Gordon Strong's book recently. He talked about using a rest at 133 when you use adjuncts . My grain bill had pilsner and wheat malt plus flaked oats and wheat. It was a 20 minute rest.

I liked the results. It upped my efficiency a few points (usually drops with adjuncts, not this time!). What I like most is that the mouthfeel seems better (it's a Belgian wit).

Just passing that along. It was my first step mash. It wasn't that difficult and didn't take a lot more time.

Cheers



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