The Great Bottle Opener Giveaway

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing > PH stabilizer 5/2

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 04-14-2013, 04:09 PM   #1
greenhaze
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Costa Mesa, California
Posts: 240
Liked 7 Times on 5 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default PH stabilizer 5/2

Has anyone used thus product. My water has a high PH and I am brewing a hefe today.
Would this product help to lower my PH , or should I just add calcium chloride ?
Slainte

__________________
greenhaze is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-14-2013, 04:45 PM   #2
Wynne-R
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Texas
Posts: 889
Liked 94 Times on 62 Posts
Likes Given: 74

Default

Short answer, ditch the 5.2, it doesn’t do much. The calcium chloride will do a little bit, not nearly enough. If you use more than a few grams, you get a minerally taste.

What you need is a small amount of acid. I use about 5mL of 88% lactic acid with moderate alkalinity water, about 100 ppm. It depends on the water and the grain bill. Your tapwater pH doesn’t have much to do with it.

Or you could use RO or distilled water. See the primer. http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f128/bre...primer-198460/

Also this is my favorite calculator: http://www.brewersfriend.com/mash-ch...r-calculator/#

__________________
Wynne-R is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-14-2013, 05:51 PM   #3
Denny
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Eugene OR
Posts: 4,206
Liked 412 Times on 313 Posts
Likes Given: 469

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by greenhaze View Post
Has anyone used thus product. My water has a high PH and I am brewing a hefe today.
Would this product help to lower my PH , or should I just add calcium chloride ?
Slainte
Your water pH doesn't matter. The mash pH does. The grain will naturally drop the pH. If it doesn't drop it enough, you can use CaCl2, CaSO4, or lactic or phosphoric acid to drop it further. I would advise against using 5.2. I did n't work for me and left a strange taste to the beer. That's also the opinion of the majority of those who have used it, based on what I've seen.
__________________

Life begins at 60....1.060, that is!

www.dennybrew.com

http://www.experimentalbrew.com - the website for the book "Experimental Homebrewing"...coming Nov. 2014

Denny is offline
VladOfTrub Likes This 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-14-2013, 08:06 PM   #4
amandabab
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: spokane, wa
Posts: 1,971
Liked 236 Times on 181 Posts
Likes Given: 446

Default

could you lower the mash ph with some starsan?

__________________
amandabab is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-14-2013, 08:09 PM   #5
Yooper
Ale's What Cures You!
HBT_ADMIN.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Yooper's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Upper Michigan
Posts: 60,056
Liked 4202 Times on 3059 Posts
Likes Given: 782

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by amandabab View Post
could you lower the mash ph with some starsan?
Phosphoric acid would work great (and I use it) but star-san has more than just 100% phosphoric acid in it and I wouldn't want to use that.
__________________
Broken Leg Brewery
Giving beer a leg to stand on since 2006
Yooper is offline
amandabab Likes This 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-14-2013, 08:25 PM   #6
b-boy
Senior Member
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
 
b-boy's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: GETZVILLE, NY
Posts: 2,265
Liked 378 Times on 280 Posts
Likes Given: 113

Default

Acid malt is also an option. I usually add an ounce or 2 to my mashes to help lower the pH. I use the
EZ-Water spreadsheet tool to figure out how much acid malt, as well as what other H2O additions to make.

__________________

Never underestimate the potential of someone who refuses to act their age.

b-boy is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-14-2013, 08:35 PM   #7
Vigo_Carpathian
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Vigo_Carpathian's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: San Mateo, California
Posts: 599
Liked 145 Times on 92 Posts
Likes Given: 8

Default

On top of any acid addition, you need a buffer or the pH will be unstable with even a small addition of acid. Adding 5/2 after a small acid addition would be ideal.

__________________
Vigo_Carpathian is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-14-2013, 08:53 PM   #8
Denny
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Eugene OR
Posts: 4,206
Liked 412 Times on 313 Posts
Likes Given: 469

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Vigo_Carpathian View Post
On top of any acid addition, you need a buffer or the pH will be unstable with even a small addition of acid. Adding 5/2 after a small acid addition would be ideal.
Except that you'd still get the off flavors it produces.
__________________

Life begins at 60....1.060, that is!

www.dennybrew.com

http://www.experimentalbrew.com - the website for the book "Experimental Homebrewing"...coming Nov. 2014

Denny is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-14-2013, 09:07 PM   #9
SilverZero
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Bend, OR
Posts: 684
Liked 30 Times on 24 Posts
Likes Given: 39

Default

So we need to formulate a flavor-neutral buffer that gets along with the ions commonly found in the mash. Maybe I'll sic some of my chemistry students on this one (or do it myself).

Some potential options: http://microscopy.berkeley.edu/Resou...n/buffers.html

__________________
SilverZero is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-14-2013, 09:12 PM   #10
MagicSmoker
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Tampa, FL
Posts: 119
Liked 14 Times on 11 Posts
Likes Given: 61

Default

I tried 5.2 in one batch and while it did, indeed, stabilize the mash pH at 5.2, it did not fix my astringency problem. It was only after changing to RO water and building it back up with CaCl2, CaSO4 and MgSO4 that the astringency went away. I also bought some 88% lactic acid and added it to both the mash and sparge water, but today I just added a tiny bit (0.25mL) to 2gal. of sparge water, as my mash pH is coming in perfect with just the RO water and salts (5.4).

It is my understanding that the malt has plenty of buffering capacity as long as the strike water isn't too far off pH of 7; it is the sparge water that is where the real problems crop up.

Hope this helps.

__________________
MagicSmoker is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
PH stabilizer Yooper Recipes/Ingredients 15 03-27-2012 08:44 PM
When do I add 5.2ph stabilizer? Tinpanharry All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 24 01-25-2012 12:24 AM
Can 5.2 ph stabilizer go bad? blkandrust All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 15 04-08-2011 06:34 PM
When to add 5.2ph stabilizer ndoe22 General Techniques 4 02-13-2011 05:06 PM
pH Stabilizer enohcs All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 20 03-20-2009 11:26 PM