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Old 08-14-2012, 03:13 PM   #1
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Default Peaches in the mash?

anyone ever done this?

most i see is peaches are only added to secondary

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Old 08-14-2012, 03:39 PM   #2
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Why do you want to add them to the mash? Fruit already has plenty of sugar that doesn't need to be converted. Adding fruit to the mash (or at any point before primary fermentation is done) will add some sugar to the wort, but most of the fruit flavor/aroma will get blown off during the fermentation (and during the boil if you add it to the mash).

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Old 08-14-2012, 03:42 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bdh View Post
Why do you want to add them to the mash? Fruit already has plenty of sugar that doesn't need to be converted. Adding fruit to the mash (or at any point before primary fermentation is done) will add some sugar to the wort, but most of the fruit flavor/aroma will get blown off during the fermentation (and during the boil if you add it to the mash).
i just hadnt seen it before. just did a pumpkin ale yesterday where you put pumpkin in the mash.

i finally found a site that describes it. basically it state that you will lose some flavor like you said but also it will give a cooked fruit flavor which is why it works well with the pumpkin
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Old 08-14-2012, 04:11 PM   #4
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Yeah, I think there's actually another thread going on about how to add pumpkin:
http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f14/pump...debate-347110/

I'm skeptical you'd get much fruit flavor to stick around by mashing/boiling the fruit (I could see the cooked fruit flavor coming from pre-caramelizing the fruit sugars somehow). Most fruits are made up of sugar, acid, fiber, and some esters in various proportions. The esters will boil off and the sugar will get converted, so you're not really left with much to impact flavor. I guess the exception to that would be those fruits that have strongly flavored oils (i.e. citrus oils in the peel), which probably benefit from a little boiling to help solubilize them. If you've got something really starchy (like sweet potato) then I could see mashing it, but I think pumpkins (and especially peaches) are pretty low in starch.

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Old 08-14-2012, 06:40 PM   #5
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Most commercial pumpkin ales don't even contain pumpkin, and adding pumpkin to the mash of a pumpkin ale doesn't add any pumpkin flavor to the beer. The pumpkin flavor in a pumpkin ale comes from the spices added near the end of the boil. What adding the pumpkin to the mash DOES add to the beer is the proteins from the pumpkin, which give the beer a thicker mouthfeel and adds a protein to the beer that gives it a similar mouthfeel as the proteins in a wheat or rye.

The TASTE of actual pumpkin IS NOT characteristic of a pumpkin beer, it's pumpkin pie spices that characterize a pumpkin beer, and the pumpkin itself is very optional!

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Old 08-14-2012, 08:12 PM   #6
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Originally Posted by TopherM View Post
Most commercial pumpkin ales don't even contain pumpkin
And I hate those versions.

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and adding pumpkin to the mash of a pumpkin ale doesn't add any pumpkin flavor to the beer!
Yes it does. Notably, Elysian and Schlafly do it this way. Here are the basics of the Night Owl recipe: Brewed with 150 lbs. of pumpkin in each batch. Made with Pale, Munich and Crystal malts green and roasted pumpkin seeds, pumpkin in the mash, boil and fermenter. Bittered with Horizon hops. Spiced in conditioning with nutmeg, clove, cinnamon, ginger and allspice.

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The pumpkin flavor in a pumpkin ale comes from the spices added near the end of the boil.
No, that's the warm Autumn spice flavors you're tasting, which are not exactly synonymous with pumpkin flavor... e.g. Cinnamon, nutmeg, ginger, clove etc.

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What adding the pumpkin to the mash DOES add to the beer is the proteins from the pumpkin, which give the beer a thicker mouthfeel and adds a protein to the beer that gives it a similar mouthfeel as the proteins in a wheat or rye.
4 cups of pumpkin puree, or about 1000g, contains roughly 7g of protein. It is mostly water, with a decent amount of carbohydrates (48-79g) and fiber (11-28g). Not as much natural sugar as you would think at roughly 10g.

As a comparison, an equal amount of rye contains 101g of protein, 744g carbs, 148g fiber, and roughly the same amount of natural sugar as pumpkin at about 10g.

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The TASTE of actual pumpkin IS NOT characteristic of a pumpkin beer, it's pumpkin pie spices that characterize a pumpkin beer, and the pumpkin itself is very optional!
Agree to disagree.

--------------

OP: Peaches don't need to be mashed. Raw pumpkin should be mashed though... Roasted pumpkin, not so much. I'm still not sold that it's a requirement.
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