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Old 12-14-2012, 12:19 AM   #31
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My bad for the redundant post earlier, guess I should actually read a whole thread before posting!



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Old 12-14-2012, 04:53 PM   #32
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Barooze,
How about putting some rice hulls in your oven at 500 degrees or so until the fire department shows up at your door?



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Old 12-14-2012, 06:59 PM   #33
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The reason people cold steep the dark grains isn't to get color without flavor. Its because during the kilning process, the grain has already been "converted." Or, probably better put, there is nothing to convert in those grains. So putting them in the mash isn't needed for conversion.

When you put them in the mash, though, it can have effects on the mash pH. When the mash pH is out of wack, you can get off flavors like tannins.

Steeping eliminates this risk. Or thats how I understand it. If you think about it, this is how you use crystal/roast malt in extract batches. Its just doing the same thing for all-grain.

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Old 12-15-2012, 11:00 PM   #34
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Sounds like Crystal Pepsi to me

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Old 12-29-2012, 03:39 AM   #35
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Riffing on the burned rice hulls thing - what about burning/roasting barley at very high temp, such that the hull is reduced to ash before the whole grain is burned?

This theory is based on making campfire corn-on-the-cob. The husk burns to ash on the first few layers, gets black and roasted underneath, and the corn is left slightly carmelized and delicious.

I might have to try this out - make a few ounces, enough to make a 1 gallon test batch.

I think the idea of a pale stout is kinda awesome - and the idea of making it roasty-and not black/dark...a challenge.

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Old 12-29-2012, 04:05 AM   #36
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Quote:
Originally Posted by barrooze
Guys, obviously talking about historical stouts wasn't the purpose of this thread. As stated above, "stout" originally meant a stronger beer. In current terms, this is no longer the case. What I was originally asking about was if it was possible to get the roasted, chocolate flavors found in stouts and porters without the color they typically add.

I think we've all made a "pale stout" if you go off the original meaning of the term. I wanted to make something akin to a White Guinness. With that in mind, does anyone know if it's possible to get a hold of some of the husks for carafa? I know the DEhusked Carafa will give color without bitterness/astringency, what i want is the opposite. I want the bitterness and astringency without the color. I figure mashing the husks will give me that. Any ideas?
Have you tried contacting the company(maltster) who makes the dehusked carafa and ask for the husks.
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Old 12-29-2012, 04:14 AM   #37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TwoGunz
Sounds like Crystal Pepsi to me
Wow, remember that shiz. Didn't they find dirty needles in that or something?
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Old 12-29-2012, 03:07 PM   #38
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TwoGunz View Post
Sounds like Crystal Pepsi to me
Or Miller Clear.
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Old 03-04-2013, 12:21 AM   #39
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Well, I tasted my first go at a "Pale Stout" today! The recipe was heavy on the Maris Otter, included some toasted Flaked Barley, flaked Oats and some Crystal 30L. There was also a pound of dark brown sugar. What I was going for was just a pale ale with the strength of a stout, and a little bit of the roasted flavor of the dark stouts.

Now that I've tasted it, I think I got the ABV about right (6%!), but the flavor is nothing like a dark stout, really. It's much lighter and fruitier, much more like a really decent ESB, which I'm perfectly fine with. I can see now that the target I was aiming at was much more in line with that style to begin with.

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Old 03-06-2013, 12:26 PM   #40
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Quote:
Originally Posted by November View Post
Or Miller Clear.
now THAT's redundant


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