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Old 11-28-2012, 08:14 PM   #31
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The best example I can think of showing stratification of solutions is a trying to pour a back and tan... without a spoon. Even with a spoon it is difficult achive something other than just brown.
Not really the best example, but you are somewhat correct. Some mixing will occur.

However; water and the finished wort, aren't anywhere near the same specific gravity. The best example that you can see if simple.

Take a glass, fill it with water 3/4 of the way full. Top it off with maple syrup. Both are thin.

Pour the syrup in as rough as you'd like. Watch the bottom of the glass.
It'll collect most of the heavy gravity syrup. The water will taste sweet, but mix it up, and taste it again... it'll be sweeter.
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Old 11-28-2012, 08:27 PM   #32
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Not really the best example, but you are somewhat correct. Some mixing will occur.

However; water and the finished wort, aren't anywhere near the same specific gravity. The best example that you can see if simple.

Take a glass, fill it with water 3/4 of the way full. Top it off with maple syrup. Both are thin.

Pour the syrup in as rough as you'd like. Watch the bottom of the glass.
It'll collect most of the heavy gravity syrup. The water will taste sweet, but mix it up, and taste it again... it'll be sweeter.
I agree the black and tan was not a great example, but syrup isn't either.
The sugar in the syrup is not in solution. I gave that example in a earlier post. The tequila sunrise is a better example than the black and tan or water and syrup.
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Old 11-28-2012, 08:30 PM   #33
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The sugar in the syrup is not in solution
Sure it is. When you're making maple syrup, you actually measure the process with a hydrometer or refractometer. I'd say it's pretty similar to the tequila sunrise example, since grenadine is basically a pretty high SG sugar syrup.
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Old 11-28-2012, 08:43 PM   #34
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I'd say it's pretty similar to the tequila sunrise example, since grenadine is basically a pretty high SG sugar syrup.
Agreed, that is closer. Although maple syup is about 1.300, and Grenadine is about 1.250, and we are talking about a 1.100 wort.
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Old 11-29-2012, 12:32 AM   #35
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I agree the black and tan was not a great example, but syrup isn't either.
The sugar in the syrup is not in solution. I gave that example in a earlier post. The tequila sunrise is a better example than the black and tan or water and syrup.

When you make maple syrup, it's pretty much like boiling down wort. Maple sap runs like water. You boil it down to concentrate the sugars.. It's very much like wort.
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Old 11-29-2012, 11:58 AM   #36
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I agree working with maple syrup is like working with a 1.300 wort. That is higher than any wort I have ever made and much higher than what the OP had. The most he could have had was a 1.133 and that would be with 100% conversion and an impossible 100% lautering efficiency. Because he had to top off, insufficient sparge water is likely the most significant issue here, not stratification. stratification may account for half a dozen points at most here.

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