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Old 01-31-2013, 01:06 PM   #11
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With an OG that high and this many hops, this would probably be considered an American Barleywine. But, mashing really high with a really high OG will most likely lead to a high FG and an overly sweet finished beer. So as was mentioned above, blending with a very dry beer might be a good idea. You could also add enzymes to further break down the unfermentable sugars. Beano is an amylase enzyme, so you could use that. But I would just wait and see how it turns out then go from there.

Also, champagne yeast isn't going to consume unfermentables that beer yeast won't. It probably won't even ferment as well as the the US-05 because champagne yeast has been engineered to ferment very simple sugars found in grapes, not complex sugars found in wort. If you want to add a different yeast you should go with a beer yeast like WLP099 super high gravity and make a starter.

Good luck!

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Old 01-31-2013, 01:10 PM   #12
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With an OG that high and this many hops, this would probably be considered an American Barleywine.
When it doesn't turn out how you imagined, change the style! Haha, best fix to your problem yet.
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Old 01-31-2013, 01:13 PM   #13
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Cool, thanks for all the advice everyone

I also realized I had another concern with the high ABV and potential impact on yeast health, will this impact my bottle carbing?

I understand that the bottle sugar is easily fermentable by the yeast, so if they are awake at all they should gobble it up and fart-up my beer nicely...but if the ABV has pushed them to sleep, is it possible they won't be able to effectively carb the bottles?

My memory is fuzzy, but I am thinking that may have been what I saw the use of champagne yeast in reference to; a way to carb a beer with an ABV too high for the original ale yeast. Is this an actual thing/concern, or is my imagination getting me in trouble?

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Old 01-31-2013, 01:14 PM   #14
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When it doesn't turn out how you imagined, change the style! Haha, best fix to your problem yet.
Exactly!! Like when you get an infection, it's not a ruined batch, it's just a sour beer!
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Old 01-31-2013, 01:24 PM   #15
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Higher gravity/ABV beers sometimes do take longer to carbonate (like a month or two instead of a couple weeks). It depends on how well you treat the yeast, how long it ages before it is bottled, what temperature the bottles are stored at, etc. Unless you age it for a long time before it's bottled you will probably have enough yeast to carbonate. You could always add a little yeast at bottling if you're worried, or if you don't want to wait as long for it to carbonate. Adding bottling yeast won't hurt anything if you do it in the right quantity.

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Old 01-31-2013, 01:44 PM   #16
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Higher gravity/ABV beers sometimes do take longer to carbonate (like a month or two instead of a couple weeks). It depends on how well you treat the yeast, how long it ages before it is bottled, what temperature the bottles are stored at, etc. Unless you age it for a long time before it's bottled you will probably have enough yeast to carbonate. You could always add a little yeast at bottling if you're worried, or if you don't want to wait as long for it to carbonate. Adding bottling yeast won't hurt anything if you do it in the right quantity.
What would qualify as a "long time"? I was sort of thinking I would do 1 month in primary, 2 months in secondary w/dry-hop for last 14 days, bottle after that at the 3-total-months-from-brew-day mark. I am basically pulling this from thin air, sort of scaling up my normal IPA times. I was then going to figure 5-6weeks for carbing, and depending on how the first one I open is, either let it go longer or start chilling them.
EDIT: I actually was going to let them age in bottles for another couple months probably, not chill right away. But I hear a lot about hop flavors/aromas disappearing over time and I want to be careful not to lose that.

As far as adding yeast at bottling, if I take a jar of my washed S-05, give it a small starter 2-3 days before to let it wake up, would I just pitch the whole thing into my bottling bucket right after tossing my sugar-solution in?
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Old 01-31-2013, 03:48 PM   #17
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At 3 months you will probably be fine with most beers unless you cold crash it or something. I was thinking more around 6 months or so. I had a 9% tripel that I bottled after almost 3 months and it carbed up just fine.

Also, I think that would be way too much yeast. You don't need to make a starter. From what I've read people are adding something like 1 tsp or so of dried yeast per 5 gallons in the bottling bucket. I would do a search to find out exactly how much to add if you go that route, but I don't think it is very much. Maybe 1/10 of the pitching amount.

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Old 01-31-2013, 05:04 PM   #18
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At 3 months you will probably be fine with most beers unless you cold crash it or something.
Even cold crashing shouldn't mess you up. It only takes a few yeast cells to carbonate, and you'll have plenty in there. Just might take longer. 2 months at most I would think
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Old 02-01-2013, 04:53 AM   #19
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like peterj said, just call it a barleywine. Since that is essentially what you brewed.

Assuming the FG is at an acceptable level it should be pretty drinkable.

This is a lesson in why taking OG readings, and adding water when needed, is a good idea. I think we've all been there when a beer ends up at a lot lower volume than planned. Luckily yours look like it will still be a drinkable beer.

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Old 02-01-2013, 12:17 PM   #20
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As far as the Barleywine VS. IIPA/DIPA...what exactly is the difference? I read a thread on here that said it mostly came down to Barleywine = Maltier flavors, meant for longer aging periods of 1-2+ years, while IIPA/DIPA = Hoppier flavors meant to balance the high ABV and not be aged as long.

Is that the general consensus? Honestly I had thought that a barleywine must use a wine yeast, since it is a "wine" and gets to such high ABV, but now it is sounding more like a difference in the flavors more than anything else...

For this beer, I will call it whatever is the best descriptor, I was just going for something with a big fat malty backbone, HUGE hoppiness, and extra high ABV. I played around with some free calculators online, and got something right around 200 IBU's, and if it finishes down to FG = 1.045 it should be about 10% ABV, and obviously have a lot of malty sweetness. Does that sound about right to others with more experience?

I'll try and remember to update this when I finally do take a FG reading and do a tasting.

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