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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing > Nottingham yeast - hydrate or not ?
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Old 10-01-2012, 08:14 AM   #11
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thanks, everybody, so if we choose to hydrate first, adding a small amount of yeast nutrient and brewing sugar - OR - a little diluted mash, would get the yeast into pro-active mode, me thinks....

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Old 10-01-2012, 11:08 AM   #12
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isnt putting the dry yeast into the fermenter rehydrating it?????????

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Old 10-01-2012, 11:15 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dougie63 View Post
isnt putting the dry yeast into the fermenter rehydrating it?????????
Rehydration in water before hitting the acidic/hyperosmotic wort helps improve the yeast health. As one poster put it, you can find lots of posts arguing that it doesn't matter. Then again you can find lots of posts that swear that one smack pack is plenty of yeast for a higher gravity beer. Like a couple others have said, if it's a lower gravity wort, then losing a few yeast won't make a difference. But if you need a whole pack's worth, I would rehydrate.
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Old 10-01-2012, 12:37 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iaefebs View Post
A couple of years ago a bad batch of dry yeast was released that was defective. If I had rehydrated it beforehand it would have been obvious. I always rehydrate just to be sure.
How can you tell from rehydrating? Unless you're also proofing.
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Old 10-01-2012, 12:41 PM   #15
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White and Zainasheff, in their book "Yeast", state that failure to properly rehydrate results in about a 50% cell loss. If I'm doing a smaller beer, I'll take that loss. If not, I'll rehydrate.

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Old 10-01-2012, 12:51 PM   #16
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Originally Posted by ChessRockwell View Post
Not that I'm disagreeing, I know there's all kinds of science behind it, but if you're just going to state an "undisputed fact" instead of your personal experience comparing/contrasting the two methods, it would help to post a source so the OP can have an "undisputed answer".

Do a quick search on this forum and you'll find a bit of dispute to your "undisputed fact".

I don't think many really argue with the science behind it, but in practice it's pretty common for many to not really notice a difference.
The people who dispute it go are the ones who conclude that it is an OK practice just b/c they did it, and beer was made. Again, I never said it wouldn't work, only that it is not optimal. There is sound scientific reasoning behind this.

Since you asked, here's just one of many sources
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Old 10-01-2012, 01:34 PM   #17
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We have tried doing both with the same wort in different carboys. OG of 1.062. One hydrated and one sprinkled. No difference that we could see or taste. FG was the same. Taste and mouth, no one could tell the difference. I would think that the only factor would be how quickly the yeast becomes active by minutes or seconds. It would seem to me that if you sprinkle, you are only delaying the hydration anyway. So if you hydrate for 30 minutes, then add or sprinkle, you may be delaying only 30 minutes but as some yeast is hydrated immediately when sprinkled, I would assume that the delay is actually minimal. Both produced very active fermentation. We no longer hydrate or do secondaries as we think they only add a chance for infection and do not effect the final brew.

That being said, we do not use dry yeast for lagers but only for ales.

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Old 10-01-2012, 03:15 PM   #18
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Another point, why not use only 1/10 of a packet of yeast, hydrate in boiled cooled water 30 mins then make additions of wort diluted down to 1.015 OG doubling the volume each time, I reckon in 2 days we would have 2 sachet's worth.

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Old 10-01-2012, 11:08 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iaefebs View Post
A couple of years ago a bad batch of dry yeast was released that was defective. If I had rehydrated it beforehand it would have been obvious. I always rehydrate just to be sure.
Rehydrating wouldnt have told you anything, whether the yeast were dead or not they would have absorbed the liquid and looked identical.
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Old 10-01-2012, 11:55 PM   #20
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I add the packet of yeast slowly,evenly,and gently.Than I paddle stir
that M@#$%$f@%^er like Jaws was chasing me in a canoe!

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