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Old 02-23-2009, 04:17 PM   #11
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This is partly b/c of the thin mash which enables you to convert more of the starches in the malt. That offsets the lower extraction rate that you have in the lauter. You basically have a no-sparge when you brew in a bag.

Kai
You can do a sparge still still with BIAB. John P said in his article that it isn't necessary but I have been sparging using BIAB method with my mini mashes. It would help efficiency as with the regular AG method, correct?

The reason I brought this up in the first place was b/c I want to go AG and this looks just as effective and efficient as a 3 vessel system without all the extra equipment.

Can someone talk me out of using this system? 1 vessel (a converted keg) verses 3?!


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Old 02-23-2009, 07:19 PM   #12
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You can do a sparge still still with BIAB.
How are you sparging with BiaB? If you only have one vessel? Just wondering...


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Old 02-23-2009, 07:39 PM   #13
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How are you sparging with BiaB? If you only have one vessel? Just wondering...
What I've done is when I remove the bag from the kettle, I leave it draining in my primary bucket. I then pour sparge-water onto the bag (still in the primary). I then transfer the bag to my secondary bucket, and pour the liquid at the bottom of my primary back into the kettle. I did that three times for the 10.5% Belgian I made. The OG of the third lot of sparge-water was 1.030, so there was still some sugar to be had from all that grain.
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Old 02-23-2009, 08:20 PM   #14
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Danek,

You may want to use a separate bucket for sparging the bag. Unboiled wort is full of bacteria and wild yeast and I would keep that out of anything that you want to ferment in. Even if you sanitize later. It is always good practice to keep the tools for the cold and hot side of brewing separate.

As for sparging the bag you should not just pour water over it. Just submerge it in another pot/vessel that holds the sparge water and mix the grains thoroughly. Then drain the bag again. Basically batch sparging in a bag. Just pouring the sparge water over the bag will lead to uneven extraction. I’m inclined that the sparge water doesn’t even have to be hot and that you should be able to get away with cold brewing water in a bucket. Mainly b/c one of the advantages of BIAB is eliminating the need for another pot to heat the sparge water in. Sparging with cold water should make for a longer lauter -> boil time though.

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Old 02-24-2009, 01:48 PM   #15
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What I've done is when I remove the bag from the kettle, I leave it draining in my primary bucket. I then pour sparge-water onto the bag (still in the primary). I then transfer the bag to my secondary bucket, and pour the liquid at the bottom of my primary back into the kettle.
So much for 1 vessel brewing I suppose... Where do you heat the sparge water?
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Old 02-24-2009, 02:27 PM   #16
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So much for 1 vessel brewing I suppose... Where do you heat the sparge water?
On the stove-top. It's not a procedure I've seen listed as part of BIAB, but it uses kit I have lying around and gets some extra efficiency, so it works well enough.
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Old 02-24-2009, 02:28 PM   #17
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Originally Posted by Kaiser View Post
You may want to use a separate bucket for sparging the bag. Unboiled wort is full of bacteria and wild yeast and I would keep that out of anything that you want to ferment in. Even if you sanitize later. It is always good practice to keep the tools for the cold and hot side of brewing separate.

As for sparging the bag you should not just pour water over it. Just submerge it in another pot/vessel that holds the sparge water and mix the grains thoroughly. Then drain the bag again. Basically batch sparging in a bag. Just pouring the sparge water over the bag will lead to uneven extraction. I’m inclined that the sparge water doesn’t even have to be hot and that you should be able to get away with cold brewing water in a bucket. Mainly b/c one of the advantages of BIAB is eliminating the need for another pot to heat the sparge water in. Sparging with cold water should make for a longer lauter -> boil time though.
All excellent points Kai - thanks for your thoughts.
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Old 02-24-2009, 04:32 PM   #18
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Quote:
As for sparging the bag you should not just pour water over it. Just submerge it in another pot/vessel that holds the sparge water and mix the grains thoroughly. Then drain the bag again. Basically batch sparging in a bag. Just pouring the sparge water over the bag will lead to uneven extraction. I’m inclined that the sparge water doesn’t even have to be hot and that you should be able to get away with cold brewing water in a bucket. Mainly b/c one of the advantages of BIAB is eliminating the need for another pot to heat the sparge water in. Sparging with cold water should make for a longer lauter -> boil time though.

Kai
This would also eliminate the concern of the Liquid to Grain ratio with this BIAB method. I have an extra pot that I could sparge with, so why not. Now I just need a converted keg to start my AG process.
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Old 02-24-2009, 04:58 PM   #19
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This would also eliminate the concern of the Liquid to Grain ratio with this BIAB method.
What concern exists regarding the liquid to grain ratio?

Kai
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Old 02-24-2009, 06:30 PM   #20
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What concern exists regarding the liquid to grain ratio?

Kai
I'm not really at all knowledgeable about the BIAB technique (though I'm thinking of trying it soon), but my understanding was that some people were concerned that the thin mash would denature the B-amylase too quickly and lead to a more dextrinous wort. (though from what I've heard, the empirical evidence contradicts this)


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