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Old 08-21-2012, 11:43 PM   #1
ahaley
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I just got my stuff today, and I'm nervous. I've read how to brew AG section several times but the terms trip me up! I would like some reassurance or correction on any of my questions about the directions..
I'm used to directions step by step. Do this then this this ect. Until the brew is done. But this AG directions say
Mash schedule : single infusion
Sacch' rest: 154*f for 60 min
Mash out: 170*f for 10 min
Boil additions and times
1oz fuggle 60min.

Just for my peace of mind...
Sacch' rest is when I mash in or get my mash tun water to 154* and let my grains soak for 60 minutes, then I vorlauf all of my wort?
And the mash out is when I batch sparge and let it sit for 10 min then vorlauf again?
Start the boil and add hops like a usual extract w/ grains?

Thanks for all the help in advance! In making my starter today and brewing tomorrow!



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Old 08-21-2012, 11:56 PM   #2
chally
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ahaley View Post
Just for my peace of mind...
Sacch' rest is when I mash in or get my mash tun water to 154* and let my grains soak for 60 minutes, then I vorlauf all of my wort?
And the mash out is when I batch sparge and let it sit for 10 min then vorlauf again?
Start the boil and add hops like a usual extract w/ grains?
Almost.

1. Yes, Sacc. rest is when you dough in by adding water to your grains (or vice versa, not everyone agrees) and then letting it sit (sometimes with intermittent stirring). You want the water temp to be higher than 154 because the grains will cool it down. Once you've added the grains and mixed well, you want the total temp to be 154. You can use a program like Beersmith to calculate your water temp for you.

2. No, technically mashing out and batch sparging are different. Mashing out describes raising the temperature of your water + grains, then holding it for a while, to stop the conversion process. To do this, most people add a little more very hot water and then stir like crazy to equalize the temps. Hold for 10 minutes, then you vorlauf, drain, add your sparge water, stir, vorlauf, drain, etc. FWIW, not everyone bothers mashing out. It's of debatable utility.

3. Yes. Once you have collected both your first and second runnings, the boiling works just like it did with extract.


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Old 08-22-2012, 12:06 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chally

Almost.

1. Yes, Sacc. rest is when you dough in by adding water to your grains (or vice versa, not everyone agrees) and then letting it sit (sometimes with intermittent stirring). You want the water temp to be higher than 154 because the grains will cool it down. Once you've added the grains and mixed well, you want the total temp to be 154. You can use a program like Beersmith to calculate your water temp for you.

2. No, technically mashing out and batch sparging are different. Mashing out describes raising the temperature of your water + grains, then holding it for a while, to stop the conversion process. To do this, most people add a little more very hot water and then stir like crazy to equalize the temps. Hold for 10 minutes, then you vorlauf, drain, add your sparge water, stir, vorlauf, drain, etc. FWIW, not everyone bothers mashing out. It's of debatable utility.

3. Yes. Once you have collected both your first and second runnings, the boiling works just like it did with extract.
Awesome thanks. I get psyched around the "science" terms
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Old 08-22-2012, 04:41 AM   #4
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You will find that the only really hard part is getting your water temperatures correct and you can expect it to take several brew sessions before you really understand your equipment. I recommend keeping some ice and boiling water on hand for doughing in and the sparge process so you can add either one to get your temps right. It doesn't take much of either to drop or raise the water a few degrees. Once your used to your equipment, you won't have to do that. Good luck!

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Old 08-22-2012, 04:56 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mike20793
You will find that the only really hard part is getting your water temperatures correct and you can expect it to take several brew sessions before you really understand your equipment. I recommend keeping some ice and boiling water on hand for doughing in and the sparge process so you can add either one to get your temps right. It doesn't take much of either to drop or raise the water a few degrees. Once your used to your equipment, you won't have to do that. Good luck!
Thanks for the words of encouragement, I'm still a little nervous, but I've watched videos and read threads and chapters but still a little psyched that I'll mess up. I'll let you guys know if I'm still alive tomorrow with or without 3rd degree burns!
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Old 08-22-2012, 03:23 PM   #6
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Back again for some things I didn't think about, my grain weighs 8.5 lbs I believe, x 1.25qt/pound=10.625 qt= 2.66~ gallons. That's how much I put in my mash run right? Then how much water do I use for the sparge? I've been reading people add a lot of water, I have a 7.5 or 8 gallon brew pot, I don't want to boil over. Thanks again guys

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Old 08-22-2012, 04:03 PM   #7
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Yes that's how much goes in the mash run. You've got to figure up how much total water you need for your batch size, and use what's left, after mash addition,to sparge. You've got to account for water lost to grains, boil off, water lost to boil trub, cooling shrinkage, any water left in equipment losses, water lost to ferment trub and any packaging losses. Add all that to the amount you want to be bottling or kegging, and that's the amount of water u need. I'm no expert, but that's what I do and it seems to work out for me.

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Old 08-22-2012, 04:56 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jdaught
Yes that's how much goes in the mash run. You've got to figure up how much total water you need for your batch size, and use what's left, after mash addition,to sparge. You've got to account for water lost to grains, boil off, water lost to boil trub, cooling shrinkage, any water left in equipment losses, water lost to ferment trub and any packaging losses. Add all that to the amount you want to be bottling or kegging, and that's the amount of water u need. I'm no expert, but that's what I do and it seems to work out for me.
Sounds good to me, do you think 7 gallons of water will be enough to make 5 gallons of beer?
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Old 08-22-2012, 05:17 PM   #9
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I just brewed ~6G in my 7.5G pot last week, and it was pretty dicey with regards to boil overs.

For the boil volume... download Beersmith! It will tell you how much water to use and what temperatures to heat your strike water to so you can hit your mash temp. It's free for 21 days so even if you don't decide to keep it, you can at least use it to answer your immediate questions.

Further, although it isn't clear from your initial post whether you are doing BIAB or a more traditional 3-vessel AG brew, you may be able to determine proper boil volumes with this site:

http://www.simplebiabcalculator.com/

I plugged in 8.5lbs grain and it spit out just under 7G (6.89) so it sounds like the right ballpark.

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Old 08-22-2012, 05:43 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ahaley
Back again for some things I didn't think about, my grain weighs 8.5 lbs I believe, x 1.25qt/pound=10.625 qt= 2.66~ gallons. That's how much I put in my mash run right? Then how much water do I use for the sparge? I've been reading people add a lot of water, I have a 7.5 or 8 gallon brew pot, I don't want to boil over. Thanks again guys
The BEST thing I can say right now is.... Before you brew a next batch get the free trail of Beersmith 2 and play with it... It will all calculate what you need as water quatities and all... I know it dosen't help you out now but will in the long run Cheers dude bro and happy first AG homebrew I'm brewing a hefewisen at the moment in quebec canada, the corn boiler is roaring at the moment as I type away what are you brewing and where ??


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