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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing > My water profile
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Old 09-02-2012, 05:52 PM   #1
Czm
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Ph. 7.5
TDS. 300
Na 20
K <1
Ca 84
Mg 8
CaCO3. 243 (total hardness)
NO3-N. 5.7
SO4-S. 7
Cl. 12
CO3. <1
HCO3. 267
CaCO3. 218 (total alkalinity)
P. 0.16
Fe. <0.01

I plugged this into a brewing calculator. From brewers friend without additives I think I'll achieve I decent stout which I'll be brewing this afternoon.
Thoughts?

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Old 09-02-2012, 10:01 PM   #2
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Its actually a little too alkaline for even a stout, but it should work out OK.

This water can be easily modified by boiling it first and decanting the clear water off the sediment that will undoubtedly form. That will reduce both the Ca and HCO3 content to reasonable levels. You can read about this decarbonization treatment on the Water Knowledge page of the Bru'n Water website. You could also estimate what the profile of that boiled water will be using the guidance there. I strongly suggest that you consider trying out the Bru'n Water software. You will find it is going to tell you something quite different from what you found on the brewers friend site. I think that brewers friend site uses Palmer's nomograph as the basis for water adjustments and that has been widely discredited.

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Old 09-04-2012, 04:43 AM   #3
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I still don't get how much by boiling would reduce my HCO3. From what I've read is if I boiled I'd lose 80or 60? so would I see 187.4 or 200.4 HCO3? From that Calculation my Ca would be about 23?
Thanks

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Old 09-04-2012, 05:56 AM   #4
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It's easier to just dilute that about 50/50 with RO water, then you can use CaCl and Gypsum to get the Ca, SO4, and Cl back up a bit.

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Old 09-04-2012, 03:45 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Czm View Post
I still don't get how much by boiling would reduce my HCO3. From what I've read is if I boiled I'd lose 80or 60? so would I see 187.4 or 200.4 HCO3? From that Calculation my Ca would be about 23?
Thanks
You got part of the calculation correct, the Ca would drop to a fairly low level. But you didn't catch that the HCO3 drops to around 60 to 80 ppm. You don't subtract 60 to 80 ppm from the original concentration. The original concentration drops to between 60 and 80 ppm. Its simpler than you assumed!

After boiling, that water is fit for a lot more styles! Its just that boiling is a PITA and takes time and money to heat it, cool it, decant it, etc. But...it works with a water like this that has a huge percentage of temporary hardness.
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Old 09-04-2012, 10:21 PM   #6
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Ok now I get it. Thanks

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Old 09-08-2012, 03:36 AM   #7
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One more question
I inputed these values in Bru'n Water (Water Input blue lines):
Ca 84
Mg 8
Na 20
K 0
Fe 0
HCO3 267
CO3 0
SO4 21
Cl 12
NO3 25.3
NO2 0
Reported Total alkanity 218
Reported ph 7.5

Here's what I get with the results (they are off)
Total Cations 5.72 (water report said 5.8)
Total Anions 5.56 (water report said 5.6)
According to Bru'n water the calculated ratio is 1.03

Here's what also doesn't agree to report:
Alkanity 221 (water report has 218)
Am I missing something? The software suggests changing Bicarbonate to 265.2 and Carbonate concentration to .4
I did that and the alkanity still didn't match.

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