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Old 04-28-2010, 04:08 AM   #11
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Right on. You live and learn. Maybe cut the Special Roasted Barley in half next time.

I made an PM Imperial Stout and used a lb of Roasted Barley. It took it about 3 mos. in the bottle to mellow and at least not dominate the stout. But that stout was 8.5% abv and needed time to mellow. I would give it time and the dynamics of the beer may completely change and the recipe may hold true as being a good one.

To beer!!

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Old 04-28-2010, 04:36 AM   #12
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My only thought is cut the amber, biscuit, and crystal way down. You have 6lbs of 2 row and 3 plus lbs of darker way too flavorful stuff with it. Some may like that flavor I don't. try 7.5lbs 2row, .5 lbs amber, .25lb biscuit, well keep the crystal. LOL drink it anyway! Good luck

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Old 04-28-2010, 11:36 AM   #13
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I think it's the recipe. I can't believe ANYBODY would use two pounds of amber malt in a five gallon batch, except maybe for a dark roasted beer. The other specialty grains are fine.

Edit- I took a peek at that thread. They keep referring to the amber malt as "home toasted". I wonder if they meant to toast some malt, instead of using actual amber malt. Here's one example: "I think the key to the flavor lies in the amber malt (Belgian Pale home toasted at 350F for 25 mins)." and "Ok, well that's confusing me I guess. How is Belgian Pale (2-row) and Amber the same? Not to mention the 3 SRM Pale,vs the 22 SRM Amber. I put Belgian pale in the recipe (to give it a semblance, if you will) of an otherwise non Belgian beer because so many people actually think it is a Belgian beer. If you toast it as I mentioned then you will have Amber, albiet done with Dingeman's Belgian Pale 2-row. Hope that clears it up for you."

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Old 04-28-2010, 12:10 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by YooperBrew View Post
I think it's the recipe. I can't believe ANYBODY would use two pounds of amber malt in a five gallon batch, except maybe for a dark roasted beer. The other specialty grains are fine.

Edit- I took a peek at that thread. They keep referring to the amber malt as "home toasted". I wonder if they meant to toast some malt, instead of using actual amber malt. Here's one example: "I think the key to the flavor lies in the amber malt (Belgian Pale home toasted at 350F for 25 mins)." and "Ok, well that's confusing me I guess. How is Belgian Pale (2-row) and Amber the same? Not to mention the 3 SRM Pale,vs the 22 SRM Amber. I put Belgian pale in the recipe (to give it a semblance, if you will) of an otherwise non Belgian beer because so many people actually think it is a Belgian beer. If you toast it as I mentioned then you will have Amber, albiet done with Dingeman's Belgian Pale 2-row. Hope that clears it up for you."
Well this one goes down as a learning experience for me. I read somewhere that it originally took over 6 months of conditioning for the first porters to become drinkeable. So maybe this one will be better in several months, and if not, oh well....
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Old 04-28-2010, 12:16 PM   #15
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Quote:
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Well this one goes down as a learning experience for me. I read somewhere that it originally took over 6 months of conditioning for the first porters to become drinkeable. So maybe this one will be better in several months, and if not, oh well....
Yes, it WILL mellow quite a bit with some age. Maybe next time, try posting a recipe here in a thread, and we can take a look. Sometimes something "weird" like that will show up right away for some of us.

I have some experience with amber malt, and home toasted malt is NOT a substitute! Home toasted malt is wonderful in many recipes, though, and I can see how they could have used 2 pounds of it in that beer.
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Old 04-28-2010, 12:33 PM   #16
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Amber and biscuit (and victory) are all basically the same thing anyway, just made from english, belgian, and US grain respectively.

Special Roast is a darker version of the same thing. Basically somewhere between amber and brown malt.

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Old 04-28-2010, 12:49 PM   #17
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I'm surprised you used 2 pounds of amber malt. A little goes a LONG way. In my DFH clone (OG of 1.070 or so), I use 6 ounces and I can taste it. I bet that's where the strong flavor is coming from. Are you certain that the original recipe had two pounds of amber malt? That's really a lot.
+1 on the Amber......thats a considerable amount. 4-6 oz. is plenty.
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Old 04-28-2010, 01:53 PM   #18
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All roasty flavors mellow. I used 8 oz of peat smoked in a barleywine, it took a year to mellow, but it did.

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Old 04-28-2010, 02:25 PM   #19
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You've got a lot of flavors going on in that recipe. More malt = more time to condition. It hasn't even been a month yet...patience.

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Old 04-28-2010, 02:34 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by YooperBrew View Post
I think it's the recipe. I can't believe ANYBODY would use two pounds of amber malt in a five gallon batch, except maybe for a dark roasted beer. The other specialty grains are fine.

Edit- I took a peek at that thread. They keep referring to the amber malt as "home toasted". I wonder if they meant to toast some malt, instead of using actual amber malt. Here's one example: "I think the key to the flavor lies in the amber malt (Belgian Pale home toasted at 350F for 25 mins)." and "Ok, well that's confusing me I guess. How is Belgian Pale (2-row) and Amber the same? Not to mention the 3 SRM Pale,vs the 22 SRM Amber. I put Belgian pale in the recipe (to give it a semblance, if you will) of an otherwise non Belgian beer because so many people actually think it is a Belgian beer. If you toast it as I mentioned then you will have Amber, albiet done with Dingeman's Belgian Pale 2-row. Hope that clears it up for you."

Thats what I gathered and did when I made mine. Put 2 pounds of 2 row on a cookie sheet at 350 for about 15-20 minutes (depending on how much you open the oven to check on it).
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