The Great Bottle Opener Giveaway

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing > Multi-Rest Mashing

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 01-23-2007, 05:39 AM   #1
Craig5_12
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Valley Springs, CA
Posts: 292
Default Multi-Rest Mashing

I know it's super easy to do a single infusion mash and most everyone will tell you to stick to this method (even local breweries and LHBS). BUT I can't help but notice in John Palmers, How to Brew he says that every mash can benefit from a rest at 104f (40c) ( http://www.howtobrew.com/section3/chapter16-2.html ).
I like getting the most out of my ingredients whenever possible, but is dealing with multi-step mashing worth it?

__________________
Craig5_12 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-23-2007, 05:59 AM   #2
Orfy
For the love of beer!
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Orfy's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Cheshire, England
Posts: 11,853
Liked 68 Times on 52 Posts
Likes Given: 30

Default

You've answered you're own question.

It's not worth it if you want to keep it simple
It is worth it if you want to do it.

There are 100's of things you can do that could improve a brew but it's a case of diminishing returns and where you want to stop.
I make great beer with simple kit, simple methods and have short brew days, under 4 hours if required.
I could do other things and possibly get some improvement in the beer but I'll stick with the results I get.

Orfy is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-23-2007, 06:18 AM   #3
Craig5_12
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Valley Springs, CA
Posts: 292
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by orfy
...but it's a case of diminishing...
Hmmm.....cases diminishing....I like the sound of that.....
On a more serious note though, I like the idea of resting at 104 to improve my extraction, now it's a matter of making a multi-rest mash easy and worthwhile. I've failed at doing a decoction already, but only because I didn't vorlauf and I used the kettle for the decoction which ended up schorching and making my beer taste like a piece of charcoal! Oatmeal Stout to Smokemeal Stout...my only failed beer....
I was thinking about running the mash through a coiled tube that was sitting in the sparge water to increase the temp of the mash. Sort of like a RIMS I suppose, what do you think?
__________________
Craig5_12 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-23-2007, 06:25 AM   #4
Yuri_Rage
Gritty.
HBT_MODERATOR.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Yuri_Rage's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Southwest
Posts: 13,893
Liked 598 Times on 370 Posts
Likes Given: 54

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Craig5_12
Hmmm.....cases diminishing....I like the sound of that.....
On a more serious note though, I like the idea of resting at 104 to improve my extraction, now it's a matter of making a multi-rest mash easy and worthwhile. I've failed at doing a decoction already, but only because I didn't vorlauf and I used the kettle for the decoction which ended up schorching and making my beer taste like a piece of charcoal! Oatmeal Stout to Smokemeal Stout...my only failed beer....
I was thinking about running the mash through a coiled tube that was sitting in the sparge water to increase the temp of the mash. Sort of like a RIMS I suppose, what do you think?
What you're describing is actually a HERMS - I use one, and I like it a lot. My AG experience is rather little at this point, but I've learned a ton, and my last brew turned out quite well! Read the "Brew Closet" link in my signature for more details on my system.
__________________
Homebrewed Blog..........YouTube Channel .......... Shirts, posters, etc
Yuri_Rage is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-23-2007, 07:01 AM   #5
Craig5_12
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Valley Springs, CA
Posts: 292
Default

Wow Yuri, thats impressive! I like it and think I'm going to go for it. Of course, my system looks a lot different than yours, but the process will generally be the same. Because of the constant circulation of the wort do you find that your beers are clearer than they used to be? Also, how many feet of tubing do you have in the HLT for the heat exchange?
My next project was going to be a kegerator, but I'm liking this idea a little more!

__________________
Craig5_12 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-23-2007, 11:15 AM   #6
Steve973
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Baltimore, MD
Posts: 297
Default

HERMS is truly great. We use an immersion chiller in the HLT, and we pump the wort through that to achieve our "heated circulation". It's really cool because (if your tubing is clear enough) you can literally see the starch conversion taking place - what was once cloudy, turbid, starchy wort now begins to clear as the mash progresses. Of course, some of this is the result of particulates being filtered out as the mash passes through the grain bed, but it also shows the conversion of starches to sugars. One thing that is particularly noteworthy - we were getting efficiency ratings in the upper seventies before we implemented HERMS, but now it's not uncommon for us to achieve efficiency numbers in the upper eighties.

__________________
Steve973 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-23-2007, 02:39 PM   #7
Yuri_Rage
Gritty.
HBT_MODERATOR.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Yuri_Rage's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Southwest
Posts: 13,893
Liked 598 Times on 370 Posts
Likes Given: 54

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Craig5_12
Because of the constant circulation of the wort do you find that your beers are clearer than they used to be? Also, how many feet of tubing do you have in the HLT for the heat exchange?
Thanks man! My wort is REALLY clear when it goes to the boil kettle. I have no idea if the end product is clearer than before because this was my first (and only) all grain setup. I think I have about 15' of 3/8" tubing in the heat exchanger.

Good luck!
__________________
Homebrewed Blog..........YouTube Channel .......... Shirts, posters, etc
Yuri_Rage is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-23-2007, 06:18 PM   #8
Craig5_12
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Valley Springs, CA
Posts: 292
Default

Woo Hoo, clearer beer and efficiency in the upper 80's. I'm all about that, I can't wait to get started. I just made a CFWC with 50' of 1/4 inch copper tubing and I really don't need that much. I think I'll cut a chunk off and use that for the coil in the HLT. Do you think 1/4 inch is too small? Or maybe I'll have more control over the temp as the heat exchange will be slower...or will it? Do you just recirculate as fast as your pump pumps? Hmmm....I guess I'll have lots of questions to come.

__________________
Craig5_12 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-23-2007, 09:52 PM   #9
Steve973
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Baltimore, MD
Posts: 297
Default

I don't see a problem with narrower tubing, as long as grain husks don't cause a clog. A smaller diameter will mean that more surface area of the beer comes into contact with the heat exchanger. You should just try the thinner tubing and see what happens. If it gives you trouble, you could always stop trying to circulate and get your temperature up by a boiling infusion, a thin decoction, or direct heat if that's possible for you. About the speed of your pump - any speed is good as long as you don't compact your grain bed. But you can go relatively slowly, although sparge speed would probably be too slow.

__________________
Steve973 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-24-2007, 06:04 AM   #10
Craig5_12
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Valley Springs, CA
Posts: 292
Default

I've been contemplating this all day and trying to come up with the best method (cheapest, easiest and most efficient) and here is what I've got.
I have a 3 tier gravity based system with the addition of a pump, which at this point I only use for pushing the boiled wort through the CFWC.
I think the best way for me to convert to HERMS is to run a copper tube from my mash into my kettle (instead of my HLT) out to the pump and then back to the mash.
I benefit with using the kettle because:
1. It's not 6' off the ground so I can see what I'm doing
2. My pump is mounted right next to the kettle so I would need less plumbing
3. I can boil the water in the kettle to use for the heat exchange (which would be quicker than using the HLT with sparge water at 180)
4. I can use the boiled water to pump through the CFWC to sterilize it before the boiled wort tranfer to the fermenter.

What do you guys think?

I guess my question at this point is, how do you get the remaining wort out of the plumbing and back into the mash once the mash is complete?

__________________
Craig5_12 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
single temp or multi-rest mash miatawnt2b All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 15 10-27-2007 03:23 AM
First multi-rest mash Don All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 3 04-07-2007 06:35 PM
Benefits of Multi-Step Mashing the_bird All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 26 03-23-2007 03:12 AM
Any benefit to multi-step mashing rye? the_bird All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 12 03-21-2007 04:34 PM
Single-Rest Infusion of Multi-Step? Brewsmith Recipes/Ingredients 9 03-13-2006 08:54 PM