Ss Brewing Technologies Giveaway!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing > Moving to 10 gallons!!
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 06-15-2012, 01:53 PM   #1
dukes7779
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: , NY
Posts: 191
Default Moving to 10 gallons!!

Finally moving up to 10 gallon batches!! Do my boils increase at all?? How does that change the OG?? If I only boil for 1 hour then my batch would be less concentrated than if I boil a 5 gallon batch for an hour. How does this affect my batches and gravities??

__________________
dukes7779 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-15-2012, 02:00 PM   #2
Chefencore
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Columbus, OH
Posts: 339
Liked 7 Times on 7 Posts
Likes Given: 3

Default

I'm assuming you got a larger boil kettle? You'll need to figure out your boil off rate-each pot is different. That will determine your starting volume. Since you are doubling the size
Of the batch, you will need to increase the amount of grain/extract you are using. This is where gravity comes in to play.

__________________

"What do you use to weigh down your hop spider?"

"Hops..."

Chefencore is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-15-2012, 02:13 PM   #3
dukes7779
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: , NY
Posts: 191
Default

Yep, new BK. can I evaluate my boil off with just water or is it not the same as wort?

__________________
dukes7779 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-15-2012, 02:14 PM   #4
dukes7779
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: , NY
Posts: 191
Default

Btw, I use iBrewMaster to develop recipes so I would imagine that would account for changes for me as well.

__________________
dukes7779 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-15-2012, 02:18 PM   #5
Brewmasters Warehouse
Sponsor
HBT_SPONSOR.png
Vendor Ads 
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Brewmasters Warehouse's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Atlanta, GA
Posts: 1,821
Liked 29 Times on 21 Posts
Likes Given: 3

Default

Switching to 10 gallons is easy. Just dealing with more of everything so things take longer when heating and getting to boil. Otherwise you can take a 5 gallon recipe and just double it. I have noticed that if you just double the recipe the beer will tend to come out a little more bitter than the same 5 gallon recipe, so you can back off the bittering hops by 5-10%.

Boil off rate can be tested with water, but it may vary slightly when you have actual wort in the pot. Water is probably best to get a starting point though.

__________________
Brewmasters Warehouse

Purchase a recipe with Brew Builder and save 10% off the recipe. Use discount code: BBBYO

Become a fan of BMW on Facebook.
Brewmasters Warehouse is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-15-2012, 02:46 PM   #6
dukes7779
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: , NY
Posts: 191
Default

Should I boil for a certain time or volume then?

__________________
dukes7779 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-15-2012, 02:58 PM   #7
tre9er
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Lincoln, NE
Posts: 4,372
Liked 232 Times on 196 Posts
Likes Given: 35

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by dukes7779 View Post
Should I boil for a certain time or volume then?
Your recipe software should account for this stuff, I would think. Basically if you boiloff 1g/hr. then that plus trub/hop absorption would mean about 1.5-2g. depending on the grain bill and hop schedule. So your finished batch size plus this is your preboil volume.

Spit-balling here, 12g. boil should yield close to 10-10.5g. into the fermenter. As was mentioned, hop utilization increases with volume, so don't just double the hops on your 5g. batches. Double the grain but scale the hops up to 190% or so (10% less than double). Again, the software usually calculates IBU's based on boil volume.

Still a 60m. boil though. It will just take longer to get to boiling.
__________________

_________________________________
Skal!
Den Faaborg Bryggeri

Quote:
Originally Posted by davekippen View Post
Open log Fermenting and gas-can secondary?? I am planning my next brew right now!!
tre9er is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-15-2012, 03:01 PM   #8
broadbill
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Southern Maine
Posts: 3,367
Liked 312 Times on 220 Posts
Likes Given: 220

Default

For the time it would take you to boil water, you could better use that time and actually make beer!

I would aim on the low side of your pre-boil volume, calculate what you boiled off in 60 minutes, and if you are low just add back some water. This strategy might impact your beer if doing an IPA where hop utlization would be an issue, but most other beers you should be OK

Alternatively, if you have too much volume, you can still calculate the boil off at 60 minutes and just continue the boil until you are at volume. In this situation, you would want to adjust your timing on the aroma/flavor hop additions.

Either way, I wouldn't bother with a "pilot" run with water. Just make some beer instead and adjust on the fly.

__________________
broadbill is offline
KevinW Likes This 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-15-2012, 03:11 PM   #9
KevinW
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Gladstone Oregon, Oregon
Posts: 1,132
Liked 6 Times on 6 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by broadbill View Post
For the time it would take you to boil water, you could better use that time and actually make beer!

I would aim on the low side of your pre-boil volume, calculate what you boiled off in 60 minutes, and if you are low just add back some water. This strategy might impact your beer if doing an IPA where hop utlization would be an issue, but most other beers you should be OK

Alternatively, if you have too much volume, you can still calculate the boil off at 60 minutes and just continue the boil until you are at volume. In this situation, you would want to adjust your timing on the aroma/flavor hop additions.

Either way, I wouldn't bother with a "pilot" run with water. Just make some beer instead and adjust on the fly.
Couldn't agree more, along with all the other great feedback on this posting!

You know dukes if things don't work exactly like they do with your 5 gallon batches the worst thing you will end up with is beer

Mash it, boil it, ferment it, then come back and tell us how you did!!

Good luck
__________________

“I don't drink beer all the time but I can drink (a) beer anytime" - Me

KevinW is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-15-2012, 03:15 PM   #10
texasbrewer73
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: The Colony, Texas
Posts: 146
Liked 8 Times on 6 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

For all grain, I boil for 90 minutes. My starting volume is 14.5 gallons (boiling in a keggle). After evaporation, spillage, and losses in the brewpot and lines, that puts about 11 gallons in the fermenter. After I lose a gallon of space from trub, yeast, etc, I end up with right at 10 gallons of drinkable beer.

__________________
texasbrewer73 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools