New Giveaway - Wort Monster Conical Fermenter!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing > The Most Frustrating Problem Ever...I want to shoot myself.




Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 10-24-2012, 10:47 PM   #21
Shooter
Almaigan Brewing Co.
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Shooter's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Hayward, CA
Posts: 4,421
Liked 222 Times on 171 Posts
Likes Given: 35

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by yooji View Post
Thanks for all the responses!

I left out some details for brevity's sake but I've thought of a few of the solutions put forth and I don't think my case fits.

Primary-Secondary and Bottling temperature has been kept at a solid 20C or 68F. Out of direct sunlight. No fluctuation in temperature. So unlikely due to temperature.

The first batch was way back in April, and I still have bottles from each batch and I assure they are still quite flat...so not due to insufficient conditioning time.

I do cold crashing but only after about a week of bottle conditioning.

I mix in the dextrose solution into my bottling bucket before bottling, I use regular yeast and not aiming a high ABV beer. I am also positive that it's dextrose. I've heard regular sugar is a no no.

I want to buy a kegging system but my brewing partner insists on the bottle conditioning *siighh* ...that day will come eventually haha.

I've also left out some key info here: I'm more a 'art' than a 'science' sort of type so I pretty fluid with my brewing...I don't take gravity readings (so I don't know ABV) but I can sure as hell taste liquor and I know fermentation when I see it. Some of the batches had some minor variation/mistakes to it involving too much water or accidentally losing some wort...but nothing that should have affected the end product.

Thanks for the help and suggestions though! I think I'm going to go the 'adding some pitched yeast at bottling' route...I still have my suspicion of autolysis or infection so I'm gonna ditch the plastic bucket and go with a super clean glass carboy with no secondary racking. I'm travelling at the moment but when I get back in a couple of weeks, I'll brew a batch and we'll she how she goes!

Thanks for the help! and I'm still open to more suggestions!
Boy, I agree, I HOPE you are not cold crashing your bottles after a week!!!!

If that was a typo, I'm not convinced in any way this is an infection. Are the bottles from April at room temperature or have they been kept at refrigerator temperatures this whole time?


__________________

Of all tyrannies, a tyranny sincerely exercised for the good of its victims may be the most oppressive. It would be better to live under robber barons than under omnipotent moral busybodies. The robber baron's cruelty may sometimes sleep, his cupidity may at some point be satiated; but those who torment us for our own good will torment us without end for they do so with the approval of their own conscience. - C. S. Lewis, English essayist & juvenile novelist (1898 - 1963)

Shooter is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-24-2012, 10:47 PM   #22
RTL
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Posts: 132
Liked 5 Times on 5 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by yooji View Post
Thanks for all the responses!

I left out some details for brevity's sake but I've thought of a few of the solutions put forth and I don't think my case fits.

Primary-Secondary and Bottling temperature has been kept at a solid 20C or 68F. Out of direct sunlight. No fluctuation in temperature. So unlikely due to temperature.

The first batch was way back in April, and I still have bottles from each batch and I assure they are still quite flat...so not due to insufficient conditioning time.

I do cold crashing but only after about a week of bottle conditioning.

I mix in the dextrose solution into my bottling bucket before bottling, I use regular yeast and not aiming a high ABV beer. I am also positive that it's dextrose. I've heard regular sugar is a no no.

I want to buy a kegging system but my brewing partner insists on the bottle conditioning *siighh* ...that day will come eventually haha.

I've also left out some key info here: I'm more a 'art' than a 'science' sort of type so I pretty fluid with my brewing...I don't take gravity readings (so I don't know ABV) but I can sure as hell taste liquor and I know fermentation when I see it. Some of the batches had some minor variation/mistakes to it involving too much water or accidentally losing some wort...but nothing that should have affected the end product.

Thanks for the help and suggestions though! I think I'm going to go the 'adding some pitched yeast at bottling' route...I still have my suspicion of autolysis or infection so I'm gonna ditch the plastic bucket and go with a super clean glass carboy with no secondary racking. I'm travelling at the moment but when I get back in a couple of weeks, I'll brew a batch and we'll she how she goes!

Thanks for the help! and I'm still open to more suggestions!
If the beer tastes okay I don't think its autolysis or infection, also if it were infection the wild yeast or bacteria would still digest added sugar and produce a carbonated final product.

You mentioned adding baking soda and vinegar to a bottle and checking for leaks, did it hiss with a release of pressure when you opened it? Have you changed bottle cappers?

How are you "positive that it is dextrose"? I'd like to know what led to that conclusion.

"I do cold crashing but only after about a week of bottle conditioning. "

This is the final thing that is a little disconcerting, yeast are more stressed during bottle conditioning and therefore need longer to work. You might be shutting them down by cold crashing after only one week. Personally I let my bottles sit 3 weeks minimum for an ale, then put one in the fridge for 48 hours to ensure the CO2 fully dissolves and test it. If you crash the whole batch before testing you risk shutting down yeast activity too early.

Taking gravity readings would help give more insight to the problem. Since its not carbonated you might as well take a reading and see where it is.

Keep us posted, and never give up.


__________________
RTL is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-24-2012, 10:49 PM   #23
Shooter
Almaigan Brewing Co.
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Shooter's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Hayward, CA
Posts: 4,421
Liked 222 Times on 171 Posts
Likes Given: 35

Default

Also, there's no reason you can't use table sugar to carbonate.

__________________

Of all tyrannies, a tyranny sincerely exercised for the good of its victims may be the most oppressive. It would be better to live under robber barons than under omnipotent moral busybodies. The robber baron's cruelty may sometimes sleep, his cupidity may at some point be satiated; but those who torment us for our own good will torment us without end for they do so with the approval of their own conscience. - C. S. Lewis, English essayist & juvenile novelist (1898 - 1963)

Shooter is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-24-2012, 11:39 PM   #24
FATC1TY
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Atlanta Area, GA
Posts: 1,597
Liked 126 Times on 106 Posts
Likes Given: 24

Default

What the ABV of the beers?

What kind of yeast are you using? If you are using an extremely high flocculation type of yeast, then you could be moving to secondary, and in turn, not getting any yeast from suspension. Are you cold crashing these before you rack as well?

Try the next batch and add like half a sachet of dry yeast to the bottling bucket with the priming sugar. Ensure you are using enough of the sugar too for the right volumes.

Let them stay warm, for 3 weeks and check on them then, after chilling them for 3 days, open.

I find it hard to believe you can't carb a bottle unless you aren't sealing the caps properly, are keeping them cold and the yeast is falling out, and/or not adding enough sugar.

EDIT:

Reading the rest here now, it appears you are cold crashing them at 1 week. DO NOT DO THAT. They need to be warm for atleast 3 weeks or more. Don't chill them what so ever, until you are ready to drink them. You are causing the yeast to go to sleep, flocculate out, and stop working. They WILL be flat if you do that.

If the added yeast doesn't carb them, something else is wrong, because introducing new yeast, and new sugars to your fermented wort, will make CO2.

__________________

----------
Bubba's Backyard Brewery

FATC1TY is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-25-2012, 12:01 AM   #25
Jaybird
Vendor
HBT_SPONSOR.png
HomeBrewTalk 2012 Vendor Giveaway Participate
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Jaybird's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Nor*Cal
Posts: 5,078
Liked 195 Times on 133 Posts
Likes Given: 75

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by yooji View Post

I do cold crashing but only after about a week of bottle conditioning.


I've also left out some key info here: I'm more a 'art' than a 'science' sort of type so I pretty fluid with my brewing...I don't take gravity readings (so I don't know ABV)

Thanks for the help! and I'm still open to more suggestions!
Cold crashing is done well before the bottling stage..Not after

No known gravity means its very hard to help with a useful solution....

Cheers
Jay
__________________
Need a False Bottom for your Keg, Kettle or Cooler?

I have been making custom False Bottoms for just about everything since 2008

Nor Cal Brewing Solutions, Reddings local homebrew store
(530)243-BEER and (530)221-WINE


Still have questions PM me here or hit the website.

http://www.norcalbrewingsolutions.com and like us on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/NorCalBrewingSolutionsfor Facebook only promos too
Jaybird is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-25-2012, 01:36 AM   #26
TrojanAnteater
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 53
Likes Given: 1

Default

Isn't autolysis pretty much a non-issue in the homebrew world under normal conditions? Also, what type of infection would inhibit fermentation? I can't think of one. If there was an infection those things would become WAY overcarb'd

__________________
TrojanAnteater is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-25-2012, 01:54 AM   #27
Hogarthe
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Bluff City, TN
Posts: 183
Liked 20 Times on 14 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by TrojanAnteater View Post
Isn't autolysis pretty much a non-issue in the homebrew world under normal conditions? Also, what type of infection would inhibit fermentation? I can't think of one. If there was an infection those things would become WAY overcarb'd
from what I've heard, autalysis in homebrew only occurs if you leave the beer in primary for over 6 months. Maybe a little less if it is very high alcohol, but most beers, it takes quite a while for that to happen.

infections usually add to the fermentation, eating some of the sugars brewing yeast can't handle, and most often will cause gushers, bottle bombs, or just plain high levels of carbonation.

For the OP's problem, I am guessing the cold crash after one week in the bottle is the problem. Have you always done this? or is this something new you've tried just with the batches that haven't carbed? It's possible that some batches carbed in a week, and you didn't notice a problem with doing that, but a week isn't enough time for every batch to carb. some beers take longer. High gravity beers can take a month, and sometimes even a low alcohol beer can take over 2 weeks, depending on temp and yeast health.
__________________
Hogarthe is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-25-2012, 05:01 AM   #28
1Mainebrew
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: , Maine
Posts: 904
Liked 25 Times on 25 Posts
Likes Given: 27

Default

Are you making starters to ensure your yeast isn't stressed out right from the get go? Stressed out yeast poops out easy and won't carb well.

__________________
Bucket: Air
Carboy 1: Air
Carboy 2: Air
Carboy 3: Chianti
Better Bottle: Air
Growlers: Air
Keg 1: Pale Ale (left tap )
Keg 2: Bourbon Imperial Stout (right tap)
Keg 3: Kate the Great
Keg 4: CO2
Bottles: Sauvignon Blanc, Blueberry Wine, Mixed Wine, Syrah, Apple Wine

In the Works: Crop Chopper in April

Favorite Recipe #1: Kate the Great Clone
Favorite Recipe #2: Crop Chopper PAL
Favorite Recipe #3: Curieux Clone
1Mainebrew is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-25-2012, 05:20 AM   #29
helibrewer
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
 
helibrewer's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Santa Rosa, CA
Posts: 2,972
Liked 155 Times on 143 Posts
Likes Given: 37

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by TrojanAnteater View Post
Isn't autolysis pretty much a non-issue in the homebrew world under normal conditions? Also, what type of infection would inhibit fermentation? I can't think of one. If there was an infection those things would become WAY overcarb'd
The creation of off flavors due to autolysis has been disputed. There is no doubt autolysis occurs, it's part of the yeast life cycle. It's actually the reason some wines are aged "on the lees", particularly whites that benefit from the body and mouthfeel contributed by the yeasts "innards".
__________________
Something is always fermenting....
"It's Bahl Hornin'"

Primary: Hefeweizen
Brite Tank/Lagering:
Kegged: Chocolate Hazelnut Porter, Kumquat Saison, Tart Cherry Cider, Belgian Tripel, Maibock Bock, Ommegang Abbey Ale Clone, Belgian Golden Strong, Belgian Pale Ale, German Pils (WLP830)
Bottled: Belgian Quad (Grand Reserve), Derangement (Belgian Dark Strong)
On Deck:
My Site: www.restlesscellars.com
helibrewer is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-25-2012, 05:31 AM   #30
amandabab
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: spokane, wa
Posts: 1,971
Liked 235 Times on 181 Posts
Likes Given: 446

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by yooji View Post
diversol
baking soda
vinegar

Take all this crap out off your bottle cleaning procedure.


__________________
amandabab is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
The process is frustrating sometimes... Devin Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 20 10-21-2012 10:34 PM
Frustrating brew day enohcs All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 5 10-12-2010 11:11 AM
Frustrating! Homercidal Hops Growing 3 05-14-2008 06:58 PM
This is getting frustrating zacster Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 10 04-23-2008 03:59 PM