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Old 01-27-2009, 06:50 PM   #31
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For you other BIABers out there, do you find any temperature difference between different parts of the kettle during mashing? I find there's a difference of several degrees between the water and the grain, as the grain tends to settle at the bottom - and there's just too much of it to keep it all stirred up for 60 minutes. When the water's at 148 or so, the grain itself can be 153 or more, and I'm not sure which one best indicates what's actually happening in the mash. I ask as I've found my last couple of beers to be a little thin. I'd assumed that the grain temp would be the temp to keep an eye on, but I wonder whether the water temp is the more important. Has anyone else found this?

I stir for a good 10 minutes when first putting the grain in. I lift from the bottom to the top constantly. I have never checked to see if there is a difference between water and grain temp. though. But I have noticed that if you do not stir regularly while ramping to mash out the bottom grains can get quite hot until you completely stir them with the other grains. So yes there are some definite hot spots while heating. During mash I leave my probe thermometer in the grain and I don't loose too much during that process. Since I have been brewing inside for the winter months I throw the pot of grains and water into a warm stove and don't even lose a degree! Now my back after humping those grains from stove top to stove and back...ouch!
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Old 01-28-2009, 05:02 PM   #32
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For you other BIABers out there, do you find any temperature difference between different parts of the kettle during mashing? I find there's a difference of several degrees between the water and the grain, as the grain tends to settle at the bottom - and there's just too much of it to keep it all stirred up for 60 minutes.
Hmmm.. I never really noticed it, in fact, I've never measured below the top 3 inches or so. When I'm taking the temperature, which I do several times throughout the mash, I'm thoroughly stirring it though.

My mash is a little thicker than the "traditional" BiaB mash, though it's still much thinner than I would use when batch sparging in my cooler.

I'm in the process of building a small HERMS chamber. It would be interesting to use it with my BiaB "system."
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Old 01-28-2009, 06:02 PM   #33
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For you other BIABers out there, do you find any temperature difference between different parts of the kettle during mashing?
I did....until I purchased a pump to recirculate the mash water for better heat distribution. But, I do a three step mash (135F, 152F & 165F) with most of my beers making even heat distribution critical.
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Old 01-11-2010, 03:42 AM   #34
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Seriously -- I am very curious about this too. Even with a really fine grind and a thin mash, you would need to do a really long mash to get good conversion and extraction. Clearly you aren't lengthening your mash time to compensate.

All the conventional brewing wisdom I have read says that the maximum theoretical extraction rates you will get from no-sparge brewing is in the 65% range. How can you get above this theoretical maximum without a sparge? (Note that's extract efficiency, and not even brewhouse efficiency.)
Conventional wisdom is what you and others have learned from experience. If you hold on to conventional wisdom too tightly you'll miss out on the new things that are being figured out.
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Old 01-11-2010, 03:44 AM   #35
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For you other BIABers out there, do you find any temperature difference between different parts of the kettle during mashing? I find there's a difference of several degrees between the water and the grain, as the grain tends to settle at the bottom - and there's just too much of it to keep it all stirred up for 60 minutes. When the water's at 148 or so, the grain itself can be 153 or more, and I'm not sure which one best indicates what's actually happening in the mash. I ask as I've found my last couple of beers to be a little thin. I'd assumed that the grain temp would be the temp to keep an eye on, but I wonder whether the water temp is the more important. Has anyone else found this?
I have found big difference in temp in different spots. Stir it til your arm is tired.
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Old 01-11-2010, 04:22 AM   #36
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Conventional wisdom is what you and others have learned from experience. If you hold on to conventional wisdom too tightly you'll miss out on the new things that are being figured out.
I wasn't saying it couldn't be done. I am just curious why it works as well as some claim.

By all means, please explain (if you know).
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Old 01-11-2010, 06:23 AM   #37
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All the conventional brewing wisdom I have read says that the maximum theoretical extraction rates you will get from no-sparge brewing is in the 65% range. How can you get above this theoretical maximum without a sparge? (Note that's extract efficiency, and not even brewhouse efficiency.)
FlyGuy the reading I've done on it would suggest the fact there is more water availible to the enzymes than there is in a mash that has the sugars more conecntrated. Essential the enzymes and sugar are competing for the water and there is more water availible in a BIAB.

Since the pH is constant through the mash the crush can be quite fine also. This also allows for quicker/easier conversion as opposed to a more coarse crush. However I have found that I don't need to grind my grist to powder, I can actually use the grind as I would for a traditional mash. I think the fact there is more water than in a traditional mash would expaln it. When I first started BIAB my grist had quite a lot of flour. Anymore I don't bother.

If you haven't given it a try you should. Its fairly easy and straight forward. There are far too many people having success with it for it to be a fluke. I'd give it a fair chance and try a few batches, but honestly there isn't a whole lot to go wrong. I have seen a few posts here or there about poor extraction, but those are few and far between.

The conventional wisdom I think many try to apply to this techique might be inaccurate. I've did about 15 batches in 2009 with this method. The worst efficiency I had was from a batch I used a 750ml bottle to crush my grain. I think Fix and Palmer mention 65% with no sprage brewing, but IIRC neither of them did a full volume mash did they?
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Old 01-11-2010, 08:00 AM   #38
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FlyGuy the reading I've done on it would suggest the fact there is more water availible to the enzymes than there is in a mash that has the sugars more conecntrated. Essential the enzymes and sugar are competing for the water and there is more water availible in a BIAB.?
This is the first time I've heard of BIAB... Where do you get the bags? Can you do all of this in your regular 15gal brew pot? It makes sense to use all the water that you would need for a traditional mash/sparge all in one (to have more water for the enzymes and all) and mash at 150 for 60 mins and then 170 for 15-20 mins. Then all you would have to do is lift the bag, drain, and then start the boil? Is this right?
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Old 01-11-2010, 08:46 AM   #39
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can a keggle biab accomodate 34#?

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Old 01-11-2010, 12:15 PM   #40
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I did my first AG (BIAB) on Sat. everything went great, I hit my target OG. I used Qbrew to calc my recipe; it was set to 75% efficiency & I am pretty sure of all volumes. Is this indicative of my Brewhouse efficiency?

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