Electric Brewing Supply 30A BCS Giveaway!


Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing > Maximizing Efficiency when Batch Sparging
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 03-14-2011, 08:30 PM   #101
crlova2
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Lexington, KY
Posts: 299
Liked 4 Times on 4 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kaiser View Post
Even in batch sparging you may need to restrict the flow in order to prevent a stuck sparge. If the "natural" flow rate is to slow b/c of poor husk quality and/or lots of flour the grain bed can still set itself if to fast of a flow is forced. I used to be able to let it "rip", but that was when I bought the grain crushed and got only 75% efficiency. Now I mill finer but need to watch the flow rate.

You'll have to find the sweet spot yourself.

WRT to boil rate, keep it between 8 and 15% per hour. To much can actually hurt the beer as the thermal loading on the wort gets to high.

Kai

Could you elaborate on the thermal loading and negative effects? I have never heard of this until now (one day after I sparged too much on a beer and tried to compensate by having the most vigorous boil possible with my BTU limitations) so I am a bit worried. I was doing a ten gallon batch in a 15.5 gal sanke keg and never had a boil over but it was boiling very hard most of the time.... Is this beer in trouble? I didn't get a final volume but it was certainly a harder boil than I normally do...
__________________
crlova2 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-05-2011, 07:37 PM   #102
Quazado
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: College Park, Maryland
Posts: 8
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default

I'm going to be doing my first AG batch later this week. I have decided to batch-sparge just due to equipment limitations. Following the conversion, should I stir the mash and let it settle again or just start draining right away? Also, how hard should the grain-bed be stirred? Are we talking a gentle swirling for a few seconds, or do I need to be scraping the bottom and turning it over?

__________________
Quazado is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-05-2011, 08:01 PM   #103
ASantiago
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Orlando, FL
Posts: 329
Liked 11 Times on 10 Posts
Likes Given: 6

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Quazado View Post
I'm going to be doing my first AG batch later this week. I have decided to batch-sparge just due to equipment limitations. Following the conversion, should I stir the mash and let it settle again or just start draining right away? Also, how hard should the grain-bed be stirred? Are we talking a gentle swirling for a few seconds, or do I need to be scraping the bottom and turning it over?
Do not stir before draining. At the end of the mash time, you recirculate a few quarts until no grains or other particles are in the runoff. Then you drain, slowly so the mash doesn't get too compacted.

After you drain, put the sparging water in. Now you stir. Stir well, but without splashing to avoid oxygen from mixing in too much. But I would give it a good, solid, stirring, bringing up the bottom, turning it over, etc. The idea is to get to any sugars that may have been left hiding. Stir slow and steady instead of fast and furious. Then you recirculate again and drain.
__________________
"I brew, therefore I am."
Pipeline
Next: 10 Gal Robust Porter, 5 in Oak Barrel
Fermenting: Janet's Brown Ale-ish
Conditioning: Simcoe-Centennial IPA in Oak Barrel
Enjoying: Witbier, Simcoe-Centennial IPA
ASantiago is offline
whis121surfing Likes This 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-15-2011, 02:53 PM   #104
bordo756
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: new york, new york
Posts: 3
Default

I am new to all grain brewing and i need some help. I did not reach my original gravity that i was supposed to hit from my recipe. I was at 1.037 and the recipe stated it was supposed to be 1.049. What could be the reason for this? i was thinking that i did not crush my grain good enough. I used 6lbs of american 2-row, 1 lb of crystal and 2 lbs of wheat. i crushed the 6 lbs of grain and then mixed everything together. Then i preheated my coleman extreme mash tun with boiling water and then dumped that out. Then i added 2.8 gallons @163 and mashed in all of my grain to hit a target of 150 mash temp for 1 hour. I was at about 152 and i opened the cooler to let the temp drop a little. then i vorlaufed a few times and collected my wort. then i batch sparged 5.9 gallons @ 170 degrees for 20 minutes, vorllauf and then collected that. I brought it all to a boil and did a 60 minute boil. .5 oz centennial for 60 minutes, .5 oz centennial for 15 minutes and then 1 oz of centennial for last 5 minutes until flame out. chilled it down to 80 degrees and got a gravity of 1.037 adjsuted the dydrometer with the temperature. I ended up with around 5.5-6 gallons of beer. Any thoughts?

__________________
bordo756 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-15-2011, 03:08 PM   #105
mmonacel
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Medford, NJ
Posts: 548
Liked 11 Times on 11 Posts
Likes Given: 3

Default

what you really want to know to help lock this down next time is your pre-boil gravity. That will let you know whether you've came out of mashing with the right gravity before you go into boil. Unless you know that then it could be due to not boiling down enough or not converting enough. My guess is the mash though.

A few things to think about:
- Look to get your pre-boil gravity from now on
- what was the efficiency for the recipe you had? Since you're new to AG, you'll need to figure out what your standard efficiency will be on your system. You could have done everything "right", but still have been off b/c your recipe assumes say a 75% efficiency and you got 70%
- When batch sparging, look to bring the grain bed up to 170 degrees. That means you'll need to sparge with hotter water (~185* usually). While you don't technically need to do a "mash out" when batch sparging, doing so usually gets you a few more points of efficiency and could have gotten you closer. Don't worry about extracting tannins since your grainbed isn't going higher than 170ish (and even if you overshot it, your PH would have to have been off for it to happen with any real concern). Check out Denny Conn and Bobby_M's articles on batch (and double batch) sparging

__________________

"Goin' downtown to the disco, gotta do it right away. Got a funky thing to get into, gonna blow my blues away!"

mmonacel is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-15-2011, 06:47 PM   #106
bordo756
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: new york, new york
Posts: 3
Default

Thanks you for responding.
The recipe said it should be 75% efficiency, i am not sure what i am getting.
So i should strike to get the mash to 150 degrees, and then batch sparge with hotter water to get it up to 170 degrees?
i was thinking about letting the sparge water sit for an hour instead of 20 minutes. Is that a bad idea also?

__________________
bordo756 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-16-2011, 12:55 AM   #107
mmonacel
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Medford, NJ
Posts: 548
Liked 11 Times on 11 Posts
Likes Given: 3

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by bordo756 View Post
Thanks you for responding.
So i should strike to get the mash to 150 degrees, and then batch sparge with hotter water to get it up to 170 degrees? i was thinking about letting the sparge water sit for an hour instead of 20 minutes. Is that a bad idea also?
Yes. You'll want to sparge with hotter water (typically around 185) to bring the grain bed up to 170 (from the 150 it was at). I've been letting the sparge water sit as well for about 15 min, but everything I've read recently has basically said there's no need to really let it sit at all. Your conversion is done - you're now just rinsing the sugars off the grain. It's much more important that you stir really well for a few min to get all the sugars in solution so you can then drain it out. Letting it sit won't hurt though if you choose to do that. Either way, stir very well.
__________________

"Goin' downtown to the disco, gotta do it right away. Got a funky thing to get into, gonna blow my blues away!"

mmonacel is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-16-2011, 04:15 PM   #108
Denny
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Eugene OR
Posts: 4,293
Liked 438 Times on 331 Posts
Likes Given: 531

Default

I have done many experiments with letting the sparge water sit for various amounts of time, from 20 min. to no sitting at all. It made absolutely no difference. Same yourself some time and trouble and just stir in the sparge water, vorlauf, and runoff.

And in batch sparging, you're not rinsing the sugars out, you're draining them. That's why it's so important to stir before draining your sparge.

__________________

Life begins at 60....1.060, that is!

www.dennybrew.com

http://www.experimentalbrew.com - the website for the book "Experimental Homebrewing"...coming Nov. 2014

Denny is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-16-2011, 07:27 PM   #109
bordo756
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: new york, new york
Posts: 3
Default

OK I am trying a blonde ale this weekend so we will see what happens with that. one more question.. should i be striking with more water then my sparge water? i felt like i was doing it backwards when i used less then 3 gallons of strike water and then used almost 6 gallons to batch sparge. or is this correct?

__________________
bordo756 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-17-2011, 03:45 PM   #110
Denny
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Eugene OR
Posts: 4,293
Liked 438 Times on 331 Posts
Likes Given: 531

Default

Use whatever ratio of mash water gets you close to 1/2 your total boil volume from the mash runoff. I usually use about 1.6-1.75 qt./lb. If your mash and sparge runoffs are estimated to be within a gal. of each other, that's close enough. If not, at the end of your mash time, add enough water to the mash to get 1/2 your total boil volume from the mash.

__________________

Life begins at 60....1.060, that is!

www.dennybrew.com

http://www.experimentalbrew.com - the website for the book "Experimental Homebrewing"...coming Nov. 2014

Denny is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Two types of batch sparging and efficiency. chase All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 4 06-21-2009 01:26 PM
What % Efficiency do you get batch sparging RobertHSmith All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 22 12-29-2008 06:27 PM
Batch Sparging EamusCatuli All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 5 06-21-2008 08:46 PM
Fly Sparging Vs. Batch Sparging New2HomeBrew All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 28 08-08-2007 05:25 PM
Batch sparging efficiency david_42 All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 6 04-08-2007 12:40 PM