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Old 02-14-2013, 04:07 PM   #1
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Default Mashing WAY too high

If you mash WAY too hot, like at 195*, do you produce any off flavors? I know the wort would be basically unfermentable, but would it cause any other flavors?

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Old 02-14-2013, 04:12 PM   #2
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You can't mash at 195 F because that is way out of the temp. range for alpha & beta amylase to even convert starches to sugars. These enzymes are quickly denatured at that temp. so you will just be left with starchy grain water.

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Old 02-14-2013, 04:54 PM   #3
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You can't mash at 195 F because that is way out of the temp. range for alpha & beta amylase to even convert starches to sugars. These enzymes are quickly denatured at that temp. so you will just be left with starchy grain water.
That and harsh tannins.
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Old 02-14-2013, 05:09 PM   #4
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I'm trying to create an unfermentable wort.
Harsh tannins are bad!

How can I achieve an unfermentable wort besides mashing above the temperature that will stop the amalaze action?
If I mash at closer to the range, but still above it, will that produce a wort that tastes "normal"?

---- My daughter and I both love the taste of the wort. She's 12 and shouldn't drink (plus doesn't like the taste of beer). We're also soda drinkers. So I was thinking about making a batch of unfermentable wort. Pitching, priming, and bottling it, so that we have 'wort soda'. Kind of like Malta I assume.

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Old 02-14-2013, 05:18 PM   #5
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Old fashioned root beer is made the way u are describing. Root beer has a ton of fermentable sugar, yeast is added to carbonate it in the bottle. However, it's only allowed to ferment until sufficiently carbonated. Then it's chilled to make the yeast go dormant, otherwise it would ferment until the bottles explode. Alcohol content is negligible at that short of a fermentation. Seems you could do the same for wort.

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Old 02-14-2013, 05:18 PM   #6
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only way to achieve something like that would be no yeast....just create the wort and force carb with a keg, or some other device(soda maker, ect.)

Or pasteruization, look at pappers thread on it

Unless someone knows something I dont, which is fairly likely

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Old 02-14-2013, 05:20 PM   #7
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If you pitch yeast you will make beer. If you want unfermented wort, maybe make up some wort and super sanitize everything and keg (assuming you want carbination, becayse even bottling with yeast may make alcohol). You could even do a mini batch of a gallon or less and keep it in your fridge.

Once you put yeast in, you have the potential to create alcohol which obviously is not something you want in this beverage you are making.. (Or at least that's my understanding.

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Old 02-14-2013, 05:27 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Halbrust View Post
I'm trying to create an unfermentable wort.
Harsh tannins are bad!

How can I achieve an unfermentable wort besides mashing above the temperature that will stop the amalaze action?
If I mash at closer to the range, but still above it, will that produce a wort that tastes "normal"?

---- My daughter and I both love the taste of the wort. She's 12 and shouldn't drink (plus doesn't like the taste of beer). We're also soda drinkers. So I was thinking about making a batch of unfermentable wort. Pitching, priming, and bottling it, so that we have 'wort soda'. Kind of like Malta I assume.
Wait... do you want to enjoy starchy grain water with your daughter? Or do you guys want to drink uncarbonated sugary wort, free of alcohol?

If the latter example is the case, then make wort like normal, but don't pitch any yeast. You'll have to drink it quick to prevent spoilage & off-flavors as well as follow all the normal rules of sanitation. If you wait too long, wild yeast will eventually ferment it. But back to the original question... mashing at normal temps. is perfectly fine for this application. I don't understand why you would want to use 195 F water.

You could also make things a hell of a lot easier and simply stir some extract into cold water for a sort of Wort Ovaltine drink.
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Old 02-14-2013, 05:29 PM   #9
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That and harsh tannins.
I think tannin extraction is more of a factor with high temperatures during sparge, particularly as the pH starts increasing. I don't understand everything about the mechanism, but I do know that plenty of brewers successfully do decotion mashes without extracting tannins, so high temps alone doesn't do it. At least not at a level that will necessarily be detrimental.
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Old 02-14-2013, 05:33 PM   #10
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Research making root beer you'll see what I mean.

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