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Old 07-23-2008, 02:50 AM   #1
JacobInIndy
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Alright, so I'm doing my first partial mash on Friday evening and I just want to make sure I have the steps correct.

I'll be using a grain bag with:
1lb Wheat
1lb 6-row
1lb flaked wheat

1. Get mash water(3.5 qts) to 165* and add grain bag.
2. Hold at 155* for 1 hour.
3. Remove grain bag and pour mash water into brew pot.
4. Sparge with 1/2 gal per lb of grain, so 1.5 gallons of sparge water. Do I just hold the grain bag over the brew kettle(say, in a strainer) and basically rinse the grains, allowing the water to drain into the pot?
5. Begin brew as I am used to with extract brewing.

I read somewhere that 6-row requires a protein rest. Will this be necessary and, if so, how do I do it?

Also, should the maltodextrin go in at flameout or sometime during the boil?

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Old 07-23-2008, 03:54 AM   #2
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Everything sounds great to me!!! Try to get your mash temp as close to the 155 range as possible, however this is not too critical since you will be adding in extract which will guarantee your fermentable sugars. I would not worry about the protein rest since, again, this is only an partial mash.

As far as the sparge goes, it is not too critical to rinse all the sugars out... but try to get as much as you can. What I used to do was brew the grains in a separate smaller kettle to produce your mash "tea". As long as you keep the heat low, you should be able to maintain your mash temp with out burning the grains or grain bag. I would time it right so that I had my big kettle fired up with the rest of the water to around 150-170 at the same time. I seem to remember "mashing" the grains for a shorter period of time (30-40 min). When I pulled my grain bag out of the smaller kettle with the "tea" in it I would drop it into the 4-5 remaining gallons of water in the large brew pot and let it soak there for a few minutes to "rinse" it. If you swirl it around some you will be surprised at how much will come out. Be sure not to apply any pressure (with your brew spoon or against the side of the kettle) because you do not want the tannins from the husks to be released. Then I poured the "tea" into the big kettle.

The method that you have mention, using a strainer or something to hold the bag while you rinse is completely valid as well and will work fine. I just found my method to be faster and easier for me. Hope this helps.

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Last edited by yeqmaster; 07-23-2008 at 03:57 AM.
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Old 07-23-2008, 11:19 AM   #3
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Are there enough enzymes in 1# of 6 row to convert 2# of unmalted wheat?

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Old 07-23-2008, 01:22 PM   #4
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Quote:
Are there enough enzymes in 1# of 6 row to convert 2# of unmalted wheat?
The guy at the LHBS suggested I use 6-row for that very reason.
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Old 07-23-2008, 01:30 PM   #5
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i used this before i went to all grain. it worked great. mhttp://byo.com/feature/1536.html
BYO - Countertop Partial Mashingethod

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Old 07-23-2008, 01:31 PM   #6
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http://byo.com/feature/1536.html
BYO - Countertop Partial Mashing


heres the link again.
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Old 07-23-2008, 01:42 PM   #7
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You can rest at 140 for 10 minutes and then raise the temp to 155 to obtain that protein rest. This will make the beer clearer, but its homebrew. Unless you are entering this into a contest in hopes to win I would skip the rest and go for it.

Good luck!

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Old 07-23-2008, 02:18 PM   #8
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What are you mashing in? (what kind of vessel). Instead of trying to suspend the grainbag and do a quasi-fly sparge, just fill your mash vessel up with your 1.5 gallons of sparge water and then dunk your grain bag in and gently bob it up and down to rinse it. You could also open the bag up and stir the best you can. This is more like a batch sparge and you'll get more extraction that way.

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Old 07-23-2008, 03:09 PM   #9
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Quote:
Are there enough enzymes in 1# of 6 row to convert 2# of unmalted wheat?

Quote:
Originally Posted by JacobInIndy View Post
The guy at the LHBS suggested I use 6-row for that very reason.

http://www.foamrangers.com/malts.html
6-Row Pale Malt
(Domestic) This malt variety forms six distinct seed rows on the grain head. Very high diastatic power allows mashing with up to 60% grain adjuncts, great if added diastatic strength is needed in a recipe. 6-Row also has greater husks per weight ratio than 2-Row. Protein rest recommended to avoid chill-haze.

I guess 67 is close enough to 60.
Plus I don't know if 60 is a guideline or an absolute limit.
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Old 07-23-2008, 03:42 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bobby_M View Post
What are you mashing in? (what kind of vessel). Instead of trying to suspend the grainbag and do a quasi-fly sparge, just fill your mash vessel up with your 1.5 gallons of sparge water and then dunk your grain bag in and gently bob it up and down to rinse it. You could also open the bag up and stir the best you can. This is more like a batch sparge and you'll get more extraction that way.

Thanks man...I am still up in the air over the vessel question. Don't know if I want to use a small brew kettle in the oven at 150-160*, or if I want to drop some coin on a beverage cooler.
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