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Old 07-04-2006, 02:47 PM   #1
jcarson83
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Default Mash water volumes

Well I guess I won't be doing my first partial mash today seeing as how my ingredients are still sitting in some Fedex warehouse. But I guess thats good so I can get one last question answered (hopefully the last for this batch). I was going through the water volumes for my mash and they seem low.

3lbs of grain
.75gal strike water
1.125gal sparge water
1.575gal wort from partial mash. Assuming .3 gal absorbed by grain.

Seems like a waste of time for only 1.6 gallons.

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Old 07-04-2006, 04:03 PM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jcarson83
3lbs of grain
.75gal strike water
1.125gal sparge water
1.575gal wort from partial mash. Assuming .3 gal absorbed by grain.

Seems like a waste of time for only 1.6 gallons.
First off you should up the sparge to 1 1/2 gallons (1/2 gallon per pound of grain). Second, for a partial mash I would use more grain if you can. What grains are you using in this beer? The whole purpose of a partial mash is to get fermentables to augment the extract. For this you will need to use some 2 row base malt. You will also add your specialty grain to the mash to extract the flavors and colors you want.
Look at this recipe that I used for the PM brew I did in my 3 gallon mash/ lauter tun.
I used 4 pounds of American 2-row which reduced the dried malt extract by 2 1/2 pounds. I used 1 1/2 gallons for the mash and 2 1/2 gallons for sparging. With grain absorption I ended up with about 3 1/2 gallons in the brew pot.
I hope this helps.
McDermit's Irish Ale

A ProMash Recipe Report

Recipe Specifics
----------------

Batch Size (Gal): 5.00 Wort Size (Gal): 5.00
Total Grain (Lbs): 8.13
Anticipated OG: 1.056 Plato: 13.81
Anticipated SRM: 14.9
Anticipated IBU: 42.6
Brewhouse Efficiency: 75 %
Wort Boil Time: 60 Minutes

Grain/Extract/Sugar

% Amount Name Origin Potential SRM
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
49.2 4.00 lbs. American 2-row America 1.038 2
36.9 3.00 lbs. Generic DME - Light Generic 1.046 8
12.3 1.00 lbs. Crystal 55L Great Britian 1.034 55
1.5 0.13 lbs. Roasted Barley America 1.028 450
Potential represented as SG per pound per gallon.

Hops
Amount Name Form Alpha IBU Boil Time
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
1.25 oz. Cascade Whole 5.80 31.5 60 min.
1.00 oz. Goldings - E.K. Whole 5.00 11.1 30 min.
Yeast
-----
WYeast 1968 London Extra Special Bitter
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Old 07-04-2006, 04:13 PM   #3
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I'd bump up your mash ratio to 1.5 quarts per pound of grain to have an average mash thickness... 1 qt/lb is considered thick, 2+ qt/lb is considered thin...

From http://www.howtobrew.com/section3/chapter14-6.html


The grist/water ratio is another factor influencing the performance of the mash. A thinner mash of >2 quarts of water per pound of grain dilutes the relative concentration of the enzymes, slowing the conversion, but ultimately leads to a more fermentable mash because the enzymes are not inhibited by a high concentration of sugars. A stiff mash of <1.25 quarts of water per pound is better for protein breakdown, and results in a faster overall starch conversion, but the resultant sugars are less fermentable and will result in a sweeter, maltier beer. A thicker mash is more gentle to the enzymes because of the lower heat capacity of grain compared to water. A thick mash is better for multirest mashes because the enzymes are not denatured as quickly by a rise in temperature.

A compromise of all factors yields the standard mash conditions for most homebrewers: a mash ratio of about 1.5 quarts of water per pound grain, pH of 5.3, temperature of 150-155°F and a time of about one hour. These conditions yield a wort with a nice maltiness and good fermentability.

And I would sparge with around 1.75 gallons to hit about 3 gallons total wort collected (mash + sparge)

Hope that Helps,

mikey

EDIT: Damn your fast fingers Rich!!!
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Old 07-04-2006, 04:32 PM   #4
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Heres my recipe, except I changed it to 4lbs of DME and 2lbs of Pale and 1lbs of Crystal.

http://www.homebrewtalk.com/showthread.php?t=10716

I got this from the Clone Brews North American.

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Old 07-04-2006, 05:33 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jcarson83
Heres my recipe, except I changed it to 4lbs of DME and 2lbs of Pale and 1lbs of Crystal.

http://www.homebrewtalk.com/showthread.php?t=10716

I got this from the Clone Brews North American.
You could bump the 2 row up to 3 1/2 pounds and reduce the DME to 3 pounds and you will end up with more wort in your kettle plus it saves you a pound of DME.
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Old 07-04-2006, 10:31 PM   #6
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Remember, the purpose of a mini-mash is to add flavors you can't get from extract and convert sugars from specialty grains that steeping can't accomplish.

The calculators are designed to give you the correct amounts of sparging water for an all-grain batch. This is always a balance between getting good extraction and minimizing boil-down time. When I do a mini-mash, I typically use around 2 quarts per pound. Then I drain the first wort and put all the rest of the water (3 1/2-5 gallons @ 170F) for the batch into the mash tun, stir and drain.

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Old 07-05-2006, 01:15 AM   #7
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The professional standard is 40 oz H20 per pound of malt.

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Old 07-05-2006, 01:00 PM   #8
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By the same token, I don't think many pros do mini-mashes. BMC might, to get mini-flavor.

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Old 07-05-2006, 03:56 PM   #9
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Thanks guys thats helpful.

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