Ss Brewing Technologies Giveaway!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing > Mash Temps High, What Should I Expect?
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 07-31-2011, 04:39 PM   #1
FirefightingBrewer
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Upper Marlboro, Maryland
Posts: 63
Likes Given: 2

Default Mash Temps High, What Should I Expect?

So I did a Red Lager Partial Mash BIAB yesterday and I had issues maintaining mash temps. My strike temp calculation was off, so after stirring I was reading about 162 degrees. I figured that I would be ok by placing it in my oven and leaving the oven off (I usually pre-heat it to 170 degrees before putting in my pot), well the oven holds heat pretty well because at the end of my 60 minute mash it lost only 2 degrees and was 160 degrees. I am sure the beer is fine, but kind of interested in knowing how this will affect the beer in the end. I am relatively new to brewing and am trying to learn how various things impact the beers outcome. Any assistance you can provide would be appreciated.

__________________
FirefightingBrewer is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-31-2011, 05:02 PM   #2
Golddiggie
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
 
Golddiggie's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Between here and there, and everywhere
Posts: 12,058
Liked 477 Times on 420 Posts
Likes Given: 266

Default

It's going to be a [very] FULL bodied brew... FG will be higher than you probably originally wanted/expected due to more long chain sugars being present.

What was your target mash temp? I've been mashing at 150-152F for my 'medium' bodied brews. Getting solid results that way.

From a BYO article I read not that long ago, they used Beano to break down long chain sugars... You could give that a shot. Crush up a few tablets and add it to the wort ASAP. If it doesn't ferment to where you want it within a couple of weeks, add a couple more crushed tablets and let it go another week or two...

Next time, hit your mash temp (within a degree or two) before you let it rest. If you're above, stir like mad, or add cold water/ice. If you're low, heat it or add hot water (boiling) to get to the temp. IMO, mash temp is critical to getting the brew you wanted. There's a reason why many of us are super attentive to hitting mash temps and go to whatever steps are needed to get at least within a degree, or two, for the brew.

__________________
Hopping Tango Brewery

跟猴子比丟屎 ・ Gun HOE-tze bee DIO-se

On Tap: Caramel Ale, Mocha Porter II, MO SMaSH IPA
Waiting/Carbonating: 12.5% Wee Honey II, 8.9% Old Ale, English Brown Ale, Lickah ESB, Mocha Porter II
Fermenting
K1:
K2: Epic mead
K3: TripSix
On Deck: Caramel Ale
Aging:mead
Mead [bottled]:Oaked Wildflower Traditional, Mocha Madness, Blackberry Melomel, maple wine
Golddiggie is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-31-2011, 05:22 PM   #3
FirefightingBrewer
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Upper Marlboro, Maryland
Posts: 63
Likes Given: 2

Default

The recipe called for strike temp to be 174 degrees for 5.5lb grain bill. While I thought this was high, I went with it...lesson learned. The original gravity was actually not as high as I thought it would be to be honest. I was sitting at 1.042 at pitching. I do not have a software program to see what the OG should have been and the recipe did not state it (Annapolis Home Brew says they don't like providing it on their recipes so folks that screw up, like me, and don't hit OG do not call to complain). With 5.5lbs of grains, and 3lbs of LME I would have guessed My OG to be around 1.048.

Do you still think I should try the Beano? Or should I just wait a few weeks check the Gravity and see if I miss the 1.010 FG?

__________________
FirefightingBrewer is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-31-2011, 05:38 PM   #4
RCCOLA
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Northwest Arkansas
Posts: 1,064
Liked 68 Times on 44 Posts
Likes Given: 57

Default

I would leave it be and see where it finished. You can always add amylase enzyme or beano later with the same results as adding it now, but you cannot take it out later.

Don't fix it before you know it's broke.

__________________
RCCOLA is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-31-2011, 05:41 PM   #5
Golddiggie
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
 
Golddiggie's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Between here and there, and everywhere
Posts: 12,058
Liked 477 Times on 420 Posts
Likes Given: 266

Default

Did they write the instructions for a BIAB method?? IMO, it's foolish to include strike temps in a kit since that will depend on factors that are outside of their control. The environment is just one of those factors. Method of mashing is another. How much water you use for the strike is yet another.

I would advise getting/using software to figure it out for your next batch. Ignore the strike temp numbers and just look for the mash temp.

Post up the recipe so we can run it through software... But, with your mash temp so high, unless you do something about it, your FG won't be 1.010. It MIGHT not be that far off, but it could be very different. Without the recipe, it's hard to say. Also without the grain bill, I won't 'stab in the dark' for what your OG should have been. Efficiency, with partial mash and all grain, will determine what you hit for the OG. Mash temp, yeast selection, and temperature it ferments at, all play factors for where your FG hits.

At this point, you could just let it ride and see where it ends. It MIGHT come in the 1.012-1.020 range for the FG... It could even come in at the estimated 1.010. You won't know until it's actually DONE... Oh, and don't rush it. If they list time frames for when to do things, I wouldn't trust them. Post up questions about that before doing the steps. Far better to wait longer to do something than rush it and get something that's "meh"...

If I was you, I wouldn't trust the info provided by that HBS, and find another source. Or start formulating your own recipes and just get the ingredients from them (if they're priced well)... There are plenty of good books you can pick up, if you don't already have them, to help you to formulate recipes. Or you can just start brain-storming and see how things come out.

I could be a bit jaded, since I started making my own recipes from batch #3 and haven't looked back. I did attempt one clone recipe, but it's not the same as the original (darker in color, but better in flavor and carbonation)... So, I just come up with my own recipes and don't worry about it.

__________________
Hopping Tango Brewery

跟猴子比丟屎 ・ Gun HOE-tze bee DIO-se

On Tap: Caramel Ale, Mocha Porter II, MO SMaSH IPA
Waiting/Carbonating: 12.5% Wee Honey II, 8.9% Old Ale, English Brown Ale, Lickah ESB, Mocha Porter II
Fermenting
K1:
K2: Epic mead
K3: TripSix
On Deck: Caramel Ale
Aging:mead
Mead [bottled]:Oaked Wildflower Traditional, Mocha Madness, Blackberry Melomel, maple wine
Golddiggie is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-31-2011, 06:11 PM   #6
FirefightingBrewer
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Upper Marlboro, Maryland
Posts: 63
Likes Given: 2

Default

Thanks guys. I am at work today and don't have the recipe with me, but will post it tomorrow evening.

As I said, I am not currently using a software. I did download beersmith's trial software, but to be honest it seemed very cumbersome and I was struggling to understand how to use it. I eventually want to play around making my own recipes as I have about 8 beers under my belt and think its about time. Just hope I can find a software that makes it easy..lol. Will take any recomendations you may have.

Also, to clarify, the FG number of 1.010 that I stated is simply an assumption based off the 1/4 of OG.

Again thanks for all your help.

__________________
FirefightingBrewer is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-31-2011, 06:18 PM   #7
mmonacel
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Medford, NJ
Posts: 548
Liked 11 Times on 11 Posts
Likes Given: 3

Default

One tip I've learned is that if you're going to add ice to cool down your mash temp, do so very sparingly and stir A LOT! The last thing you want to do is cool it down too much and then have to raise it back up with more hot water (which you may or may not have handy). Trust me on this one...

__________________

"Goin' downtown to the disco, gotta do it right away. Got a funky thing to get into, gonna blow my blues away!"

mmonacel is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-31-2011, 06:34 PM   #8
FirefightingBrewer
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Upper Marlboro, Maryland
Posts: 63
Likes Given: 2

Default

Well I can tell you, moving forward I am creating a mash tun or buying a mash tun and going all grain. It's no more effort than my partial mash brews and I will be able to manage my mash temps without too much of a problem. Although I am still nervous giving up my LME or DME security blankets...LOL

__________________
FirefightingBrewer is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-31-2011, 06:34 PM   #9
Golddiggie
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
 
Golddiggie's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Between here and there, and everywhere
Posts: 12,058
Liked 477 Times on 420 Posts
Likes Given: 266

Default

Without the recipe, it's really impossible to say what the FG would be. You do know what happens when you assume, yes? It's also the mother of all F-ups.

I was able to grasp how to use BeerSmith pretty easily/quickly (first 1.4, then 2.0)... It's really just a matter of learning where things are, and such. It's not rocket science, it's brewing...

In my own efforts to reach temperatures better, easier, faster, I'm converting a [1/2 bbl] keg into a mash tun. It should be large enough to handle my 5 gallon recipes, and maybe even when I move to 10 gallon recipes (might be a bit tight there). I'll be able to direct fire it to reach/maintain the temperatures, and will recirculate the wort so that I don't scorch the grain. For the coming batch, I'll use the 10 gallon mash tun cooler as a HLT. After that, I expect I'll have another burner and will just heat the sparge water shortly before needing it.

There are a few books that will help you formulate your own recipes. Designing Great Beers is one of them. I would also suggest picking up the new Yeast book (by Chris White and Zamil Zainasheff)... You can get some clone recipe books too, if you wish. Or just review recipes on BYO to see how other brews are made and go from there. Get a good database of what the different grains will give you in the brew, and then you'll be able to mix flavors to get what you want. Brew enough batches and you'll see how they blend/meld in brews. Also learn about the hops, picking what works best in the brew, giving flavors that you want. Yeast selection can also be just as important. Don't overlook that. Not only for flavors, characteristics, and attenuation, but also flocculation/clarity... Once I shifted away from plastic fermenters (for my beer, been using glass for mead) it's been easier to let things go. I've gone past the need/urge to see inside the fermenter. I have thermometer strips on the sides of all my fermenters, so that I can tell when things are going on. Increased wort temperature means the yeast is active. Even if the airlock is still, if it's above the ambient air temp (x days after pitching) then it's got things happening. Learning to leave things alone, letting the yeast do it's job is another important step/lesson. Sure, you can have beer pretty quick, but you can have great brew if you let it take the time it needs. There's plenty more things, probably all of them already posted a bazillion times on the boards.

__________________
Hopping Tango Brewery

跟猴子比丟屎 ・ Gun HOE-tze bee DIO-se

On Tap: Caramel Ale, Mocha Porter II, MO SMaSH IPA
Waiting/Carbonating: 12.5% Wee Honey II, 8.9% Old Ale, English Brown Ale, Lickah ESB, Mocha Porter II
Fermenting
K1:
K2: Epic mead
K3: TripSix
On Deck: Caramel Ale
Aging:mead
Mead [bottled]:Oaked Wildflower Traditional, Mocha Madness, Blackberry Melomel, maple wine
Golddiggie is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-31-2011, 06:37 PM   #10
Golddiggie
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
 
Golddiggie's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Between here and there, and everywhere
Posts: 12,058
Liked 477 Times on 420 Posts
Likes Given: 266

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by FirefightingBrewer View Post
Well I can tell you, moving forward I am creating a mash tun or buying a mash tun and going all grain. It's no more effort than my partial mash brews and I will be able to manage my mash temps without too much of a problem. Although I am still nervous giving up my LME or DME security blankets...LOL
Who says you have to? Get a refractometer and if you're not at the SG you need, add some DME towards the end of the boil. Personally, I only use DME for my starters. If I miss my OG target, I just let the brew ferment as I was originally going to. I've had some solid brews that were lower OG than I had intended. As long as you're not at 1.030 and your target was 1.085 (or similar) you'll be fine. Or toss in some DME and boost the OG... Just be sure you know what it will do to the rest of the brew.
__________________
Hopping Tango Brewery

跟猴子比丟屎 ・ Gun HOE-tze bee DIO-se

On Tap: Caramel Ale, Mocha Porter II, MO SMaSH IPA
Waiting/Carbonating: 12.5% Wee Honey II, 8.9% Old Ale, English Brown Ale, Lickah ESB, Mocha Porter II
Fermenting
K1:
K2: Epic mead
K3: TripSix
On Deck: Caramel Ale
Aging:mead
Mead [bottled]:Oaked Wildflower Traditional, Mocha Madness, Blackberry Melomel, maple wine
Golddiggie is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools