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Old 08-28-2012, 03:15 AM   #1
ahaley
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Default I was thinking blueberry stout?

Plainbrad gave me this recipe for a "normal" stout

5G
60min boil

6 lb Pale Malt (2 Row)
1 lb Barley, Flaked
1 lb C120L
1 lb Roasted Barley

My addition; maybe 4lbs of blueberries at 5 minutes or flameout?

1 oz Fuggles (or Willamette at 60min

As or yeast I'm not sure I don't know any yeast flavors really..

And as I've been reading, I may get mixed up, lower mash temp = more fermentable beer while higher temp = less fermentable but dry crisp taste?

I was thinking mash in ( still learning terms sorry if they're incorrect ) at about 160*? And batch sparge at about 170*?

About 2.8 gallons I'll say 3 gallons to mash, 1 gallon to sparge and maybe 2 gallons to bring it to 6 gallons for boil then top off at 5 or 5.5 if needed?

Please correct me on my water usage this would be my second AG and last time I kinda winged it for the water for the sparge and top off :x

Well let me know if you guys think this may work? I saw threads on blueberry wheats, and I thought a blueberry stout would be good.
Prost! Brew on.

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Old 08-29-2012, 04:45 AM   #2
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Higher mash temp usually means a heavier body or thicker mouthfeel, and more maltiness. The lower mash temp means more fermentable sugars, and a drier beer.

Blueberry stout sounds awesome. Might have to try that one, myself. Let us know how it turns out.

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Old 08-29-2012, 04:56 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MrSpiffy
Higher mash temp usually means a heavier body or thicker mouthfeel, and more maltiness. The lower mash temp means more fermentable sugars, and a drier beer.

Blueberry stout sounds awesome. Might have to try that one, myself. Let us know how it turns out.
Awesome thanks, with Thad said in thinking maybe a higher mash temp, maybe around 170*? And do you have any insight on the yeast that would be nice?
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Old 08-29-2012, 05:27 AM   #4
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Adding fruit before primary fermentation will leave you with less than desirable results. The yeast will consume all of the fructose very quickly and the vigorous fermentation (as well as the boil if you add it at that point) will drive off almost all of the fruit aroma and flavor.

Either add the fruit in secondary or add fruit extract to keg or bottle. I've tried your method with purée and it turned out awful.

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Old 08-29-2012, 05:33 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by justins2582
Adding fruit before primary fermentation will leave you with less than desirable results. The yeast will consume all of the fructose very quickly and the vigorous fermentation (as well as the boil if you add it at that point) will drive off almost all of the fruit aroma and flavor.

Either add the fruit in secondary or add fruit extract to keg or bottle. I've tried your method with purée and it turned out awful.
Should I do while berries then? Maybe do a small split so juice gets out and throw them to secondary?
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Old 08-29-2012, 05:43 AM   #6
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Not sure of your questions as stated, but if you're looking to add fresh blueberries, I would freeze them first (to partially sanitize and to help break down the fruit's cell walls), thaw and add to the fruit to secondary. If you're kegging and you don't have enough blueberry character, you can always add blueberry extract to supplement. The going rate for fruit beer is to add 1 lb of fruit per gallon. This may vary for different fruit but that's what experimentation is for. Good luck!

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Old 08-29-2012, 05:57 AM   #7
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I did 3lbs of blueberry in 3 gallons of wheat. I could tell it had a fruit in it, but I couldn't tell it was blueberry. As mild as blueberry is, I would bump it up to 1.5lbs per gallon next time and I'm not even sure you could taste that in a stout.

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Old 08-29-2012, 06:35 AM   #8
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I was asking if I should slice them open to allow the juice to freely come out, but I'll pick up like 6 lbs of blueberries tomorrow and throw them in the freezer. Does the recipe itself seem to be able to handle the blueberries? And do you have a yeast suggestion?

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Old 08-29-2012, 01:55 PM   #9
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I put mine through a juicer, which could be why it was hard to identify as blueberry. A lot of their tartness is in the skin.

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Old 08-29-2012, 04:22 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bleme
I put mine through a juicer, which could be why it was hard to identify as blueberry. A lot of their tartness is in the skin.
Oh ok, so I should do whole blueberries in the secondary for about a week?
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