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Old 10-09-2010, 12:51 AM   #11
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The enzymes in the grain husks that convert the grains starches into sugars will not convert the pumpkins. You can aid the conversion with the use of pectic enzyme. Not many fermentable sugars will result tho. It is almost imposible to get a pumpkin beer that taste like pumpkin and not the spices. Pumpkin is very starchy and taste simiar to squash. On a side note, some of the best Pumpkin pie isn't made with pumpkin but with Butternut Squash.
Enjoy tho

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Old 10-10-2010, 02:13 PM   #12
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I made a pumpkin ale this weekend with 60 oz. (5 gal) batch, but I added the pumpkin in phases-
30 oz in the mash water while it was heating - before adding to the mash.
15 oz @ 60 minutes
15 oz @ flameout

The wort has a nice orange color to it.
When I first put it in the fermenter, the pumpkin trub was about 5 inches, two days later, its about 2 inches (not much more than a typical batch).

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Old 10-10-2010, 11:14 PM   #13
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OK, so pumpkin by itself does not contribute any fermentable sugars (or very little) into the brew. We just hope for the taste of pumpkin in the finished product.
But what about sweet squash, like butternut, spaghetti or sugar squash? I found this video on YouTube:

The Dude on this video boils squash in order to release sugars. Sounds like a great idea.

OK now, what about sweet potatoes or yams? Should I boil them or do I need to bake them first and then add them to the mash for conversion???

Right now I'm thinking of converting my old Pumpkin Ale recipe into a "Pilgrim's Harvest Ale", with yams, squash, sweet patatoe and pumpkin in it. Is it a good idea, what do you guys think?

One more question: there is two types of pumpkins on the market: one is called the "pie pumpkin", it's small in size, and it's good for cooking. The other one is the "big" pumpkin, good for Halloween decorations. Does it make any difference which one I use for brewing?
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Old 10-10-2010, 11:20 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Battery_BreweryNJ View Post
The enzymes in the grain husks that convert the grains starches into sugars will not convert the pumpkins. You can aid the conversion with the use of pectic enzyme. Not many fermentable sugars will result tho. It is almost imposible to get a pumpkin beer that taste like pumpkin and not the spices. Pumpkin is very starchy and taste simiar to squash. On a side note, some of the best Pumpkin pie isn't made with pumpkin but with Butternut Squash.
Enjoy tho
Hmmm now I'm confused. Jamil, in Brewing Classic Styles, says that the enzymes will convert the pumpkin but may take up to 90 minutes.
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Old 10-11-2010, 03:13 PM   #15
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My bad I was partially wrong. Amalyze enzymes with convert the starches in pumpkin into sugar in time, Pectic enzyme will help increase the yield of juices, by breaking down the cell walls. Thus getting more pumpkin "flavor" into your beer. Without the use of pectic enzyme, the pumpkin will make the beer starchy.

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Old 10-11-2010, 05:33 PM   #16
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According to Wikipedia raw pumpkins are about 1.36% sugars, and about 4.6% other carbohydrates, some of which may be possible to convert.
So not much sugar or starch is available, but some...

I've posted this somewhere already, but the way I've used them for brewing:
get a lot (a bushel of seconds is ideal) of sugar pumpkins (other squash would work too)
Slice really thin (skin on if fine)
Put in stock pot with 1" of boiling water
Boil until very soft
Crush it down to a paste
Strain out meat trying to get all juices
Use this juice for mash water and first sparge (if not all)

If you have lots of rice hulls around you can add some of the meat to the mash to potentially get a little more out of it... or make a dozen pies.

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Old 10-11-2010, 05:54 PM   #17
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I just brewed mine on Saturday and had the same results, no increase in gravity due to the pumpkin. BTW I used canned organic pumpkin from Whole Foods, baked at 350 for 30 minutes and added it to the strike water. THen added to grain along with a 1/2lb rice hulls. 1/2 lb is not enough rice hulls. I had to mix in another 1/2 lb to get the sparge going.

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Old 11-06-2010, 01:20 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shecky View Post
I have no idea on the fermentables issue, but I have done pumpkin ales with canned pumpkin both in the boil and in the mash. The one that I mashed (just a few weeks ago) has far more body and better color. And it wasn't a PITA to mash. Throw in a pound of rice hulls and you're golden so long as you go a bit slower on the sparge.

If you use it in the boil, you're going to have an assload more trub than if you use it in the mash.
I am considering this also. Thanks for the read on doing it either way. I'm thinking of sparging the mushed pumkin over the top of my grain bed. This will make the grain into a filter.

I'm thinking after reading this, longer boil before I start adding hops to bring up the original gravity and a longer fermenting/secondary. I have never done a true secondary and I don't have a carboy. Maybe I try a multiple yeast pitch and a little extra priming sugar to help it along in secondary in my HDPE bucket (...or just go buy a carboy...)




Quote:
Originally Posted by nilo View Post
I mashed the cooked pumpkin with the grains and it added nothing to my OG.


Holy cripes! That avatar is beautiful. What beer is that?
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Old 11-06-2010, 01:25 PM   #19
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Old 11-06-2010, 01:31 PM   #20
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