Kegconnection Complete Starter Kit and More Giveaway!


Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing > How long to mash for?

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 06-06-2008, 07:57 PM   #1
Cugel
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Washington D.C. Metro area
Posts: 512
Default How long to mash for?

I had been planning on a 90 minute mash at 150F. But I plugged my recipe and equipment information into BrewSmith, along with a "medium body double batch sparge" mash profile.

BrewSmith then tells me that I should mash for 60 minutes at 154F (or thereabouts, maybe 156F).

Are both correct? Which should I do?

Thanks

__________________
Cugel is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-06-2008, 08:01 PM   #2
k1v1116
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 971
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts

Default

a temp of 150 for 90 minutes will make a very light beer, Ive never had to go below 152 for longer than 60 minutes. but it all depends on the style your making. 150 for 90 sounds like a light lager maybe.156 for 60 should make a very full bodied malty beer.

__________________
k1v1116 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-06-2008, 08:02 PM   #3
wildwest450
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 9,099
Liked 163 Times on 149 Posts
Likes Given: 4

Default

All the beers I have made have been mashed for 60 minutes, although some do call for longer mashes, you need to post your recipe.

__________________
wildwest450 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-06-2008, 08:06 PM   #4
Cugel
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Washington D.C. Metro area
Posts: 512
Default

Wow - I blink and there are two responses! LOL. Thanks guys.

I was planning on making BierMunchers SWMBO slayer, but that recipe does not state how long to mash for. My general reading led me to believe that 90 minutes at 150-152 would work well for most beers.

BM's recipe does say "Mash Schedule: Single Infusion, Medium Body (154-156 degrees), Batch Sparge". Just doesn
t say for how long. Sounds like it should be for 60 minutes. BeerSmith appears to be correct again.

__________________
Cugel is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-06-2008, 08:10 PM   #5
Beerthoven
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Beerthoven's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Cary, NC
Posts: 2,175
Liked 11 Times on 10 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

I'd go by what your recipe says, rather than the default settings in BeerSmith.

The preset numbers in BeerSmith are generic; you can and should change them to suit your needs.

__________________

Primary/Secondary: #109 Rye, #110 APA

Kegged: #106 American Wheat, #107 IPA, #108 Nut Brown

Planned: Red IPA, American Brown

Beerthoven is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-06-2008, 08:19 PM   #6
Orfy
For the love of beer!
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Orfy's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Cheshire, England
Posts: 11,853
Liked 68 Times on 52 Posts
Likes Given: 30

Default

If you know what you are doing you can mash from 20 minutes to 24 hours.
45 minutes will give full conversion in most circumstances.

60 - 90 minutes is best if you are unsure.
My mash time is usually set to fit in with anything else I'm doing at the time

Orfy is offline
MistaKlein Likes This 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-06-2008, 10:13 PM   #7
malkore
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
malkore's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Nebraska
Posts: 6,922
Liked 32 Times on 30 Posts
Likes Given: 9

Default

orfy beat me to it. I've had full conversion in 45 minutes with Briess 2-row. 50 mins is usually when I vorlauf, and the 60 minute mark is typically when I start the draining, or sometimes the sparge water is being added by now.

__________________
Malkore
Primary: English Mild
On tap: Pale Ale, Lancelot's Wheat, English Brown Ale, Steam Beer, HoovNuts IPA
Bottled: MOAM, Braggot, Raspberry Melomel, Merlot, Apfelwein, Pyment, Sweet mead, Cabernet
Gal in 2009: 27, Gal in 2010: 34, Gal in 2011: 13, Gal in 2012: 10
malkore is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-06-2008, 10:55 PM   #8
AnOldUR
fer-men-TAY-shuhn
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
AnOldUR's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 6,042
Liked 534 Times on 389 Posts
Likes Given: 406

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by k1v1116 View Post
a temp of 150 for 90 minutes will make a very light beer . . . .
He's probably meaning dry not light. Higher abv less body.

Edit: Hey, am I actually learning something from all the time I spend here?
__________________
Sent from my POS computer because I refuse to own a smartphone!

Last edited by AnOldUR; 06-06-2008 at 11:13 PM. Reason: just a little druck
AnOldUR is online now
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-06-2008, 11:02 PM   #9
Otis The Drunk
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Texas Panhandle
Posts: 172
Default

I mash for 90 mins all the time, It all depends on what your schedule is like...
I also have been known to mash over night.
Either way I've made very good beer.

What makes the beer have a residual sweetness is the temperature you mash at, not the length of time you mash it.

__________________
Toxic Waste Brewery

Currently in Primary: zip
Currently in Secondary: Dry Stout
Bottle Conditioning: Not a Thing
Drinking: Run of the mill Pale Ale
What's Next: Lake Walk Pale Ale

The Liver is Evil, therefore it must be punished
Otis The Drunk is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-06-2008, 11:27 PM   #10
Yooper
Ale's What Cures You!
HBT_ADMIN.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Yooper's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Upper Michigan
Posts: 60,365
Liked 4282 Times on 3120 Posts
Likes Given: 830

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Otis The Drunk View Post
What makes the beer have a residual sweetness is the temperature you mash at, not the length of time you mash it.
Well, that's not entirely true. BOTH time and temperature play a factor. The longer you mash, the more long chain dextrines are broken down. A 90 minute mash generally means a more fermentable wort, a 45 minute mash generally means a less fermentable wort.

From John Palmer's How to brew:

As always, time changes everything; it is the final factor in the mash. Starch conversion may be complete in only 30 minutes, so that during the remainder of a 60 minute mash, the brewer is working the mash conditions to produce the desired profile of wort sugars. Depending on the mash pH, water ratio and temperature, the time required to complete the mash can vary from under 30 minutes to over 90. At a higher temperature, a stiffer mash and a higher pH, the alpha amylase is favored and starch conversion will be complete in 30 minutes or less. Longer times at these conditions will allow the beta amylase time to breakdown more of the longer sugars into shorter ones, resulting in a more fermentable wort, but these alpha-favoring conditions are deactivating the beta; such a mash is self-limiting.
__________________
Broken Leg Brewery
Giving beer a leg to stand on since 2006
Yooper is online now
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Long mash, sour mash salzar All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 20 12-28-2011 04:38 PM
How long of a mash is actually necessary? bgrubb7 All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 25 11-21-2010 02:52 PM
Is it possible to mash for too long? pnj All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 19 05-12-2009 10:45 PM
How long to mash an RIS? crazyboy All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 4 03-28-2009 04:20 AM
Can you mash too long? BierMuncher All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 9 01-27-2007 02:24 AM