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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing > Home Toasted Malts, and the Waiting Game
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Old 09-25-2012, 02:52 AM   #1
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Default Home Toasted Malts, and the Waiting Game

Per the instructions in John Palmer's "How to Brew" I home-toasted some malt. It's sitting in a little brown, paper bag over there, aging a little.

http://www.howtobrew.com/section4/chapter20-4.html

I'm hearing conflicting reports about how long I have to wait to brew the beer. Palmer's instructing a pretty long wait, but it looks like folks on the interweb have done all kinds of stuff (as homebrewers do) and these rules fly out the window.

Experienced toasters, I ask you: How long must I wait?

I took half rahr red wheat, and half rahr 2-row and soaked it for an hour before roasting for an hour at 350 degrees, with occasional stirring and extra water additions to caramelize it a little while toasting.

Should I wait 24 hours (as some do) or wait a whole week (as the book suggests). What are your experiences suggesting?

(I plan on using this toasted malt to kick up a plain-jane hefeweizen recipe, if that helps you advise.)

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Old 09-25-2012, 03:00 AM   #2
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I waited about a week, but that was out of circumstance. I would have used the toasted malt the same day if I could have. I don't care much for rules, and I tend to bend them a lot. I was very happy with the results, by the way.

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Old 09-25-2012, 03:04 AM   #3
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I've done same day, out of the oven into the mash, without any problems. I let them sit if I can but if need be I just toss them in when I need them.

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Old 09-25-2012, 04:06 AM   #4
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I toast a fair amount of malt for my English bitters and have found that in a delicate beer, letting the grain sit for a week gives the cleanest flavor.

I had one batch of toasted malt that went right from the oven to the mash tun and the resulting beer had a very unpleasant grainy-peanut butter flavor that I can only attribute to not letting the grain sit. But on the same note, I've the same thing for darker beers with no problem.

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Old 09-25-2012, 05:37 AM   #5
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For toasted I use them same day I toast them. For Roasted, I let them sit a week at least.

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Old 09-25-2012, 01:01 PM   #6
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Thanks for your responses! I think I shall use them tonight, and it should be fine. They smell fine. Deliciously fine, in fact. They seemed a little astringent right out of the oven, though. I don't know if I would do same day unless they were very mild. These homemade toasted malts have the same color as some Caramunich I have around. Will update with results. Maybe.

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Old 09-25-2012, 01:04 PM   #7
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Oh, and I think if I wasn't doing a Hefe with crazy yeasty flavored, I'd wait a week. Clean ale yeasts probably would enhance anything harsh. I think you're probably right about that for British beers. It's what Palmer says, too.

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Old 09-25-2012, 07:25 PM   #8
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if its anything like roasting coffee, the grain needs time to settle back down and develop the flavors that you roasted it for in the first place.

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Old 09-27-2012, 06:51 PM   #9
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The beer is fermenting away in the primary. It's the best-smelling Danstar Munich fermentation I've ever had, and I suspect the toasted malts are the reason for that. For lighter toasts, 24-48 hours is probably enough. We'll see what it tastes like in a few weeks, though!

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Old 09-28-2012, 04:58 AM   #10
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Not to hijack the thread, but is there anyone out there with experience concerning toasted/roasted specialty grains?
What about roasting malts in a pan? If the base malt is highly diastatic one shouldn't have to worry about protecting enzymes in the roasted portion, right?

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