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Old 07-06-2005, 11:34 PM   #1
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Default High Mash Temp.....What to Expect?

As I noted in my "Taking the Plunge" thread, I mashed my first AG batch too hot.....160F. Now I'm not all broken up about it, because I realize it takes some experimentation to get your strike temp right.

However, I am curious as to how this stuff might come out. I used Wyeast's London ESB (1968) yeast, which is highly flocculant, and attenuates fairly low.

I'm thinking this stuff is going to come out too sweet. I racked it to secondary last night, and it was at 1.020. I agitated the yeast a little to try and get it down a little further. I found some East Kent Goldings, so i dry hopped it. Figured that might help a little.

So whaddya think?

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Old 07-07-2005, 12:13 AM   #2
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First off..way-to-go ..congrats on the first AG. Welcome to the wonderful world of AG and its complexities. I have always struggled with infusion strike temperatures. That is until I added steam.

I think you may be a tad on the sweet side but the dry hopping may just add some real character to the taste. It may taste sweet to some but not to others. I love that 1968 Wyeast. I use it all the time in my ESB's and English Pale Ale's.

Under shooting my strike temps has always worked best for me . Then I work at moving the temp up instead of down.

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Old 07-07-2005, 01:18 AM   #3
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I'm hoping the dry hopping does something for it.....I'm not a fan of overly sweet beers. I wish I'd had some British Ale yeast on hand (I forget the #)....or anything else that might attenuate a little higher.

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Old 07-07-2005, 05:22 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sam75
I'm hoping the dry hopping does something for it.....I'm not a fan of overly sweet beers. I wish I'd had some British Ale yeast on hand (I forget the #)....or anything else that might attenuate a little higher.
Just bottled my first all grain. I built of of the igloo mash tuns. Not knowing how much my temp would drop I got my water to 180 added the grain only droped 5 to 175. I let it go for an hour. OG was 1050, I was shooting for 1060, but I let it go anyway. Gravity today was 1012 and it taste great its not sweet at all. I was making an american brown. I'm not really sure but I guess that some grain is more forgiving than others????
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Old 07-07-2005, 08:58 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sam75
As I noted in my "Taking the Plunge" thread, I mashed my first AG batch too hot.....160F. Now I'm not all broken up about it, because I realize it takes some experimentation to get your strike temp right.

However, I am curious as to how this stuff might come out. I used Wyeast's London ESB (1968) yeast, which is highly flocculant, and attenuates fairly low.

I'm thinking this stuff is going to come out too sweet. I racked it to secondary last night, and it was at 1.020. I agitated the yeast a little to try and get it down a little further. I found some East Kent Goldings, so i dry hopped it. Figured that might help a little.

So whaddya think?
most ESB's i've had and brewed were not too sweet at all. i think you'll be fine. the EK Golding wil lbe okay too. if you notice a "grainy" or "astringent" taste in your ESB, it may be from extracting too much tannins from the grains. that usually happens when sparging w/ water over 170-175 degrees. or, you may not notice a thing. it probably wasn't as high a temp throughout that mash as your reading indicated. maybe one of your best yet!
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Old 07-08-2005, 02:33 AM   #6
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how hot was the ambient temp of your grains when you threw them in the tun? 170 should be about dead on for the low 150's... is your thermometer correct?

you can always add pints of cold water to bring the temp down and leave the lid off the cooler till you hit yer desired temp... get a long stemed thermometer that can stand up in your mash so you don't have to hold it, or you can get the conversion and put a thermometer in the side of the tun.

i used to keep me grains in the fridge, then i realized i was pulling them out too late and the strike temp was not sufficient because the grain was too cold, fridge is almost freezing temps

kent goldings are fast becoming my favorite hop.. so is the irish yeast from whitelabs....

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Old 07-08-2005, 04:57 AM   #7
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Yeah, now I realize that I could have added some water to cool the mash, but as I said before, this was my first ever AG. I didn't have any clue as to how much heat my setup would lose. So, it was an experiment....now I know!

As you mention, the grain temp is a factor I need to remember. In the case of this batch, they were garage temp.....probably about 82-84F. That didn't help much. Again, something I hadn't really thought of. Thanks for mentioning it....I'll remember that in the future!

Having a thermo in my mash tun is up there on my wish list. I swear (and ORRELSE can verify) that my mash temp didn't waver from 160F the entire time. We were measuring from right about the center of the mash.

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Old 07-08-2005, 07:07 PM   #8
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Sam75, how many pounds of grain did you use. I will run it thru ProMash
and see what the strike temp should be according to Promash. Just curious.
Also, what was your grain to water ratio? Or how much 170 water did you use
for dough in?

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Old 07-09-2005, 04:49 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by t1master
kent goldings are fast becoming my favorite hop.. so is the irish yeast from whitelabs....
T1master, do you happen to have the WL number for that Irish yeast?
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Old 07-10-2005, 02:36 AM   #10
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Sudster: I've got Promash, but didn't do the calculations beforehand. I'm still kinda learning that as I go, too.

As for the yeast, looks like WLP004. You can find them all here: http://www.whitelabs.com/search.asp

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