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Old 05-01-2014, 01:53 AM   #11
StarsanManiac
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Originally Posted by Yooper View Post
Why are you doing a multi-step infusion starting with a beta glucans rest?
Admittedly I have confused beta glucan with protein rest, AND I'm not fully aware of the benefits/trade-offs of the various rests. I skimmed Palmer a while back and decided to try the 40-60-70 step mash (104 - 140 - 158°F)

http://www.howtobrew.com/section3/chapter16-2.html

I built an electric herms system because I could. Then, I did step mash because I could. From what I'm hearing a single infusion would give me the beer I want more so than the 40-60-70, but given my setup I don't find step mashes any more of a challenge. Do the fully modified malts I'm using benefit AT ALL from beta glucan or protein rests? The beer I'm drinking now is nice and clear with a great head despite being a simple 2-row SMaSH and I would not want to lose those aspects in my next brew.
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Old 05-01-2014, 02:24 AM   #12
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Wheat and especially rye benefit from a beta glucan rest as they make a very sticky grain bed. Wheat sometimes gains by using a protein rest but barley probably doesn't at all. Try the single infusion and see if it gets you where you want to be. Remember the step mashes if you work with rye or wheat.

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Old 05-01-2014, 06:10 PM   #13
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That seems like the right approach. Thanks everyone for the info and suggestions.

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Old 05-02-2014, 02:02 AM   #14
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Originally Posted by scott613 View Post
This is very interesting and just the kind of detail I'm looking for. Thanks!



I did my protein rest at 104F, not 140F. Is the 113 to 131 a better range, i.e. 126F as the other poster did?
Single infusion is best with most malt these days unless you're shooting for something different in your beers. The only reason I'm doing a decoction with my next batch is because the SRM range is 14-23 for the style and all of the malts I'm using only puts it around 7-8 SRM. The decoction is there so I can stick to the style guidelines and achieve desired color. I do single infusion mashing 99% of the time.

I use a 10g gott cooler for my mash tun so the 126 strike is to compensate for a little heat loss but keep it in range for the rest. My grain bill for that batch is 58% wheat.
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Old 05-02-2014, 02:15 AM   #15
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The enzymes have a preferred temperature range but I wouldn't be too sure that beta amylase wouldn't have any conversion at 140 F. I think you can get a protein rest at a lower temperature though. Plamer states that this happens between 113 and 131 F.
The amylase isn't there for us to brew beer. It's there for the germinating barley seed to be able to metabolize its starch reserves. Since very few Canadian farm fields reach 150F at planting time, I think it's safe to assume that the enzymes are capable of working at pretty low temparatures, albeit pretty slowly when compared to what we're used to as brewers. Even the amylase in your saliva works pretty quickly at around 90 degrees.
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