Ss Brewing Technologies Giveaway!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing > Help w first attempt at partial mash..
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 12-27-2011, 07:55 PM   #1
ChadChaney
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Carroll, IA
Posts: 452
Liked 4 Times on 4 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default Help w first attempt at partial mash..

Hey all, I want to try and do a partial mash instead of just steeping grains. I am looking to get clearer better flavor from one or two last batches before I go all grain and hoping this will help. So my question is this, is there a rule of thumb or calculator for figuring how much base grain to use to convert other specialty grains? Thanks.

__________________
ChadChaney is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-27-2011, 08:20 PM   #2
BillyBroas
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 500
Liked 13 Times on 9 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

The rule of thumb is 1:1 ratio of base malt to specialty malt. You especially want to stick to that if you'll be using adjuncts that can't convert their own starches and need to borrow enzymes. For example, if you're using 1 lb of flaked wheat then you'll want to mash at least 1 lb of base malt, like 2-row.

Once that condition is met, there's no reason not to fill your mash tun with as much base malt as possible. Just deduct whatever you use for base malt from what you would have used for malt extract.

Let me know if you want help with specific numbers.

__________________
The Homebrew Academy - Free online video course for homebrewers.

BillyBrew.com - Craft beer and homebrewing blog

Follow me on Twitter right here
BillyBroas is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-27-2011, 08:26 PM   #3
TipsyDragon
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: California
Posts: 2,607
Liked 21 Times on 19 Posts

Default

look up the grain's diastatic power. Some grains like 2-row have a rating of over 100% which means they can not only convert their own starches to sugars but the starches of other base grains as well. Other base grains have a diastatic rating of 100% or less and need another grain to help them convert.

__________________
TipsyDragon is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-27-2011, 09:00 PM   #4
ChadChaney
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Carroll, IA
Posts: 452
Liked 4 Times on 4 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

@BillyBroas-- Thanks, exactly what I was looking for. I do not have a mash tun, a true tun, I was thinking about using a smaller pot and doing the steep/soak in preheated oven method and maybe using separate water for sparing to get better efficiency. Tossing around an IPA, I have the recipe, I will post it when I get home from work with what i am thinking about modifying and maybe you can look at it and see what you think? Thanks again.

__________________
ChadChaney is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-27-2011, 09:11 PM   #5
RM-MN
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Solway, MN
Posts: 6,658
Liked 750 Times on 628 Posts
Likes Given: 241

Default

On the other side of the equation it the fact that not all specialty grains will benefit from mashing. You will get about the same from steeping Crystal 60 as with mash it. The darker the malt, the less can be converted by mashing.

__________________
RM-MN is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-27-2011, 09:13 PM   #6
RM-MN
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Solway, MN
Posts: 6,658
Liked 750 Times on 628 Posts
Likes Given: 241

Default

Something else to wrap your brain around. Doing a partial mash in a grain bag is so close to doing an all grain mash with BIAB that you might want to start your all grain experience that way. You can do a 3 gallon batch in a 5 gallon boil kettle. Once you have done it you will wonder why you waited to start all grain.

__________________
RM-MN is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-27-2011, 10:06 PM   #7
BillyBroas
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 500
Liked 13 Times on 9 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ChadChaney View Post
@BillyBroas-- Thanks, exactly what I was looking for. I do not have a mash tun, a true tun, I was thinking about using a smaller pot and doing the steep/soak in preheated oven method and maybe using separate water for sparing to get better efficiency. Tossing around an IPA, I have the recipe, I will post it when I get home from work with what i am thinking about modifying and maybe you can look at it and see what you think? Thanks again.
Sure, I'll take a look at it and recommend some volumes. Let me know what size pot you're using too if you have that info.

What the other guys saying about not all specialty grains needing mashing is correct. The darker malts like crystal, chocolate, and roasted barley have their starches converted inside their hull during processing which is why they can be steeped. But when you're mashing (even in partial mashing), you mash all the grains. I just don't want you thinking you have to steep grains separately and do unnecessary work.
__________________
The Homebrew Academy - Free online video course for homebrewers.

BillyBrew.com - Craft beer and homebrewing blog

Follow me on Twitter right here
BillyBroas is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-28-2011, 05:50 AM   #8
ChadChaney
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Carroll, IA
Posts: 452
Liked 4 Times on 4 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

Wow, thanks for all the great input! My last IPA was made with 9 lbs of Pilsen Light DME (Briess), .5 lbs 60L Crystal (steeped) and .25 lbs Belgian Strong (steeped). Flavor was killer, but a little hazy, I ws thinking it might be due to starches that are not getting converted in the steep, and thought if I mashed that with some base malt, I might solve that issue. I am only working with a 3 gallon kettle right now, ugh, but have some goodies on order. Waiting on a 10 gallon brew kettle with a spigot and thermometer, 2 to gallon coolers, one for mash tun w false bottom and one with sparging setup. Plan on using a bucket for HLT, cant wait for it all to get here, just waiting on the false bottom to arrive! I do not want to interrupt my pipeline though, so I thought I might brew a few more 5 gallon extract batches first.
I have the advantage of working in a wine and spirits dept. of a Midwest grocery store chain and am in charge of the homebrew supplies, so my boss lets me pay cost for my equipment! I also get to brew for our "beer club" so I get to practice once a month or so for free as long as I bring the brew to the club tasting, nice deal for me!
Back to the topic though, would I benefit from mashing those particular grains with base malts instead steeping or just a waste of time? I mean I guess it can not hurt right, I kind of want to get an idea of the difference even a small mash can make in a brew.

__________________
ChadChaney is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-28-2011, 06:27 PM   #9
daksin
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
daksin's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: San Diego, CA
Posts: 4,098
Liked 272 Times on 238 Posts
Likes Given: 324

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ChadChaney View Post
Wow, thanks for all the great input! My last IPA was made with 9 lbs of Pilsen Light DME (Briess), .5 lbs 60L Crystal (steeped) and .25 lbs Belgian Strong (steeped). Flavor was killer, but a little hazy, I ws thinking it might be due to starches that are not getting converted in the steep, and thought if I mashed that with some base malt, I might solve that issue.
There's no conversion going on in a steep. Crystal malts and other specialties have already been converted and caramelized. Partial mashing has its advantages, but it won't solve this particular problem. Haze could be chill haze- are you using irish moss/whirlfloc or other finings? Hops haze is also common in high-hop beers, especially with lots of late additions and dry hops.

The beers could also be young- try giving them more time to clear in primary next time. Do you have the ability to cold crash your beers?
__________________

I can't be arsed to keep up this list of what's in the fermenters, but hey, check out the cool brewery I own!

twitter.com/2kidsbrewing .. facebook.com/2kidsbrewing .. 2kidsbrewing.com

daksin is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-29-2011, 05:52 AM   #10
ChadChaney
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Carroll, IA
Posts: 452
Liked 4 Times on 4 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

I realize there is no conversion in a steep, that is why I am thinking of the mini-mash. I think my issue might be hop haze, going to try the sparge bag.paint strainer on the end of auto-siphon this time for filtering. I was wondering if I would gain anything; flavor, clarity, body, etc. from mashing this particular set of grains.

__________________
ChadChaney is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Partial Mash First Attempt poopyhead All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 7 01-26-2011 03:59 PM
1st Attempt at partial-mash Krelja All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 1 05-19-2009 09:20 PM
My First Attempt at a Partial Mash BoyScout All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 1 04-20-2009 04:36 PM
Partial Mash (attempt) Review Dougan All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 2 02-11-2009 12:47 AM
My first gimpy attempt at partial mash Torchiest All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 25 03-20-2007 02:18 PM