Ss Brewing Technologies Giveaway!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing > "Grainy" Aftertaste
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 01-30-2008, 12:31 PM   #1
jcb317
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Bethlehem PA
Posts: 123
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default "Grainy" Aftertaste

I just finished up a split batch of a pale ale, a pretty close variation to Ed Ws Haus Ale. Both beers taste good, but i notice a somewhat sweet grainy aftertaste. I brewed a blonde ale several months ago and i noticed the same flavor. At the local homebrew meeting one brewer thought i had extracted too much tannin in the mash. Is that the characteristic you would expect from that? I have recently (within the last 6-8 batches) switched to doing batch sparging, i am pretty sure my temperatures have been on par (168F sprage water) with mash temps in the 150s. Besides that i cant think of anything else i changed in my process, and like i said the majority of what I made has not had this in the aftertaste. Any suggestions on what i can look into to eliminate this on future brews?

Thanks in Advance,
Jason

__________________
jcb317 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-30-2008, 12:38 PM   #2
Soulive
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Soulive's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: The Middle of NJ
Posts: 4,331
Liked 7 Times on 7 Posts

Default

I agree that you may have extracted tannins. Its hard to tell though if you didn't record your mash temp. In the 150's is too vague to narrow things down. For future brewing, always monitor your mash temps...

__________________
Cheers!


===================
Green Lane Brewing
===================

Primary = Evan!'s Special Bitter
On Deck = EdWort's Porter / American Amber


EdWort's Haus Pale Ale Count
Soulive is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-30-2008, 01:01 PM   #3
jcb317
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Bethlehem PA
Posts: 123
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default

I did monitor temps. I mashed my Blonde at 154F for 60m, and the Pale at 152F for 60m.

__________________
jcb317 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-30-2008, 01:18 PM   #4
TexLaw
Here's Lookin' Atcha!
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
TexLaw's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Houston, Texas
Posts: 3,696
Liked 24 Times on 23 Posts

Default

It does sound like tannins. Your temperatures sound fine. How long did you mash? Did you check the pH of your mash and sparge? How fine is your crush?


TL

__________________
Beer is good for anything from hot dogs to heartache.

Drinking Frog Brewery, est. 1993
TexLaw is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-30-2008, 01:20 PM   #5
njnear76
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Middlesex,NJ
Posts: 815
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default

Maybe you can try adding the 5.2 PH stabalizer to your mash. Either that or you can look into the wonderful world of water chemistry.

njnear76 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-30-2008, 01:22 PM   #6
CBBaron
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
CBBaron's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Cleveland
Posts: 2,787
Liked 6 Times on 4 Posts

Default

Also did you vorlauf to ensure the wort was clear before each draining. This is the step that bit me a couple times. Ph is another possible problem if you are not monitoring it, especially during the last sparge.
Craig

__________________
CBBaron is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-30-2008, 01:22 PM   #7
jcb317
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Bethlehem PA
Posts: 123
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default

I did not check PH at any stage. My mash time was 60m on both batches, and i am not sure about the crush. My LHBS does that. I did brew a wit right after (same day) as the pale ale with crushed grain from the same mill, crushed minutes after the crush for the pale's grain bill.

__________________
jcb317 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-30-2008, 01:24 PM   #8
Yooper
Ale's What Cures You!
HBT_ADMIN.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Yooper's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Upper Michigan
Posts: 61,040
Liked 4459 Times on 3246 Posts
Likes Given: 868

Default

I'm no water expert, but I am wondering if you're only getting this grainy aftertaste with the lighter colored beers, and not with darker beers. TexLaw asking about your PH put my train of thought on your water.

Isn't it true that the "lighter" beers will exhibit a grainy taste if your water is too alkaline, more so than the darker beers like stouts? So, if you mashed at those temperatures, the only thing I can think of is mash ph being a factor.

From Howtobrew.com:
The term "hardness" refers to the amount of calcium and magnesium ions in the water. Hard water commonly causes scale on pipes. Water hardness is balanced to a large degree by water alkalinity. Alkaline water is high in bicarbonates. Water that has high alkalinity causes the mash pH to be higher than it would be normally. Using dark roasted malts in the mash can balance alkaline water to achieve the proper mash pH, and this concept will be explored later in this chapter
Also, here: http://www.howtobrew.com/section3/chapter15-2.html

__________________
Broken Leg Brewery
Giving beer a leg to stand on since 2006
Yooper is online now
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-30-2008, 01:29 PM   #9
TexLaw
Here's Lookin' Atcha!
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
TexLaw's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Houston, Texas
Posts: 3,696
Liked 24 Times on 23 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by YooperBrew
Isn't it true that the "lighter" beers will exhibit a grainy taste if your water is too alkaline, more so than the darker beers like stouts? So, if you mashed at those temperatures, the only thing I can think of is mash ph being a factor.
It could be sparge pH, as well. I actually expect that it is sparge pH. Often, brewers who go through great lengths to treat their mash water neglect to treat their sparge water in the same way and end up raising the pH to problem levels while sparging.

Yes, darker beers have less problems with grainy aftertastes, as the darker grains do more to lower your mash pH and help keep it down while sparging.


TL
__________________
Beer is good for anything from hot dogs to heartache.

Drinking Frog Brewery, est. 1993
TexLaw is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-30-2008, 02:19 PM   #10
slnies
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
slnies's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Maple Lake MN
Posts: 867
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts

Default

I would go with the water being alkaline. I have had similar problems. I now use distilled water for my light colored beers, and this take care of most of the problem, the rest as I found out was DMS.

__________________
Nies

Primary: American Wheat
Secondary: Phils Pils Clone
slnies is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
"American" or "Imperial" Oatmeal Stout Recipe: Critiques please! cladinshadows Recipes/Ingredients 4 01-04-2012 10:21 PM
Going for a "grainy" taste, any suggestions? chrisedjohn Recipes/Ingredients 8 10-09-2009 02:03 PM
Going for a "grainy" taste, any suggestions? chrisedjohn Introductions 7 10-08-2009 06:57 PM
Science behind "grainy character" menschmaschine Brew Science 11 07-21-2009 01:12 AM
All my batches so far have a "grainy" taste please critique my technique jmooney Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 16 12-23-2008 01:27 PM