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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing > Good resource for Partial Mash mathematics?
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Old 10-25-2010, 10:14 AM   #1
vast_reaction
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Default Good resource for Partial Mash mathematics?

Hi there! I have been lurking awhile, and just can't seem to find what I need. I would like to use some Biscuit Malt or Victory Malt in my next beer, and from what I can tell, these need to be mashed, not just steeped. What I am trying to find out is, specifically how much Pale 2-Row does it take to convert the starch in 6oz of Biscuit Malt, etc. I don't understand what diastatic power is, so if someone has a link to something I could read, or can explain it to me, that would be... great. Thank you in advance!

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Old 10-25-2010, 12:39 PM   #2
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http://www.brewingtechniques.com/bmg/noonan.html

There is a section on starch conversion that will help you with the math.
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Old 10-25-2010, 12:56 PM   #3
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From the Beersmith blog.

To get a quick idea of whether you have sufficient diastatic power in your all grain or partial mash brew, I recommend you simply average the weighted diastatic power of your ingredients and see whether the final number is greater than the 30 Lintner minimum needed to convert. The overall diastatic power for your mash would be the sum of the diastatic power for each ingredient times its weight divided by the total grain weight. To get this number, just multiply the diastatic power for each grain times the weight of that grain, add the numbers up for all of your grains, and divide by the total grain weight.

Lintner_for_batch = Σ(lintner_for_grain * weight_of_grain) / (total_batch_grain_weight)

American 2 Row Pale Malt: 140 °L
American 6 Row Pale Malt: 160 °L
British Pale Malts: 40-70 °L
Maris Otter Pale Malt: 120 °L
Belgian Pale Malt (2 row): 60 °L
German Pilsner Malt: 110 °L
Munich Malt (10 SRM): 70 °L
Munich Malt (20 SRM): 25 °L
Vienna Malt: 50 °L
Wheat Malt, German: 60-90 °L
Wheat, Unmalted (flaked, Torrified): 0 °L
Crystal Malt (all): 0 °L
Chocolate Malt: 0°L
Black Patent Malts: 0 °L

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Old 10-25-2010, 08:50 PM   #4
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Wow. Simply wow. This is a gold mine. Thank you very much.

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