Home Brew Forums

Home Brew Forums (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/forum.php)
-   All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f36/)
-   -   getting in to all grain (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f36/getting-all-grain-373369/)

sibs 12-11-2012 12:22 AM

getting in to all grain
 
i just made my mash tun yesterday and i wanted to get going some time this week but i just realize i only have my 4 gallon extract brewing pot. can i use it for all grain full boils? from what i been reading i am gonna need a bigger pot.
will this make a good brew pot
http://www.bedbathandbeyond.com/prod...%3E%3C%2Fa%3E&

worksnorth 12-11-2012 12:28 AM

Assuming your doing 5 gallon batches, 7.5 gallons would definitely work depending on the beer, you'll have to watch that boil. Do they have a ten gallon? Slightly more forgiveness! Have fun!
Cheers

zachattack 12-11-2012 12:30 AM

IMO 7.5 gallons is not enough. I usually start with 7 gallons preboil and still have to be careful to avoid boilovers. It will work, but things will be a lot easier with a 40+ quart pot.

You can get a 10 gallon aluminum pot at a restaurant supply store/website for $30-40. The spigot makes things easier, but it's not needed and can be added in later.

sibs 12-11-2012 12:45 AM

yes i plan on doing mostly 5 gallon.

zachattack 12-11-2012 12:52 AM

Starting with 6-8 gallons preboil is pretty standard for 5 gallon batches. It all depends on your boiloff rate.

shoreman 12-11-2012 01:03 AM

You can do partial boils google up randy moshers lazy guide to mashing

With a 4 gallon pot you'd have to shoot for 2.5 final and add to get final

shelly_belly 12-11-2012 01:30 AM

Not a good buy. For that price you could buy a 36 or 44 qt stainless steel Bayou Classic pot from Amazon or maybe one of the vendors here. Sam's club online has great prices on quality aluminum pots if you want to keep the price down and add a ball valve and weldless fitting yourself or just use a racking cane. By the way, I regularly boil 7.5 gallons in my 30 quart pot by adding a few drops of fermcap.

inhousebrew 12-11-2012 01:31 AM

7.5 gallons is going to put you at the absolute minimum and even if you're pretty careful you'll most likely still have some boil overs. I use an 8 gallon and that is cutting it close at times.

Qhrumphf 12-11-2012 01:36 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by shoreman (Post 4670013)
You can do partial boils google up randy moshers lazy guide to mashing

With a 4 gallon pot you'd have to shoot for 2.5 final and add to get final

I do partial boil all-grain, and I'm happy with my beer. I'd be doing full boil if I could, but high rise apartment + poor strength electric stove means not a possibility. That said, if you can do full boils, definitely go with a bigger kettle than the gallon one you've got. If not, you can work with what you've got.

shoreman 12-11-2012 01:47 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Qhrumphf

I do partial boil all-grain, and I'm happy with my beer. I'd be doing full boil if I could, but high rise apartment + poor strength electric stove means not a possibility. That said, if you can do full boils, definitely go with a bigger kettle than the gallon one you've got. If not, you can work with what you've got.

I prefer partial boil all grain - I pretty much follow mosher's advice except do a batch sparge rather than no sparge. Freeze my spring water and chill down to about 100 in no time and blend. My brew day is 3 hours tops.

I rarely brew anything over 5% and it works great, super clean beers and I can do 10 gallon batches in my 9 gallon bayou classic if I want.

If I want to brew a big beer ill just do BIAB 3 gallon full boil.

For years I brewed like this in a $20 5 gallon stainless pot and made some really great beers.

Simplicity.


All times are GMT. The time now is 02:44 AM.

Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.