Happy HolidaySs Giveaway - Last Sponsor Giveaway of the Year!

Come Enter the BrewDeals/FastFerment Giveaway!


Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing > fly sparging
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 02-01-2008, 01:04 PM   #1
Grimsawyer
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Salem, OR
Posts: 886
Liked 4 Times on 4 Posts

Default fly sparging

Going to start fly sparging instead of batch sparging. How long should it take to sparge. Aboput 45 min for a 5 gallon batch? Also, if you mash out do you have to worry about tannins from over sparging?

__________________

"I feel sorry for people who don't drink. They wake up in the morning and that's as good as they're going to feel all day." -Dean Martin

Quote:
Originally Posted by TheFlyingBeer
...no sense hauling empty carboys around when full ones take up just as much space. :)
Grimsawyer is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-01-2008, 01:34 PM   #2
shafferpilot
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
shafferpilot's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Cincinnati OH
Posts: 1,639
Liked 19 Times on 18 Posts
Likes Given: 6

Default

So long as you keep the temp right, you're good. Out of curiosity why the switch?

__________________

A great man knows that he knows NOTHING

shafferpilot is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-01-2008, 01:51 PM   #3
Grimsawyer
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Salem, OR
Posts: 886
Liked 4 Times on 4 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by shafferpilot
So long as you keep the temp right, you're good. Out of curiosity why the switch?
March pumps are a serious pain in the @$$!!! Tired of priming the pump. As for the enzyme question, what temp do you kill enzymes? The main reason I batch sparged is because I diddn't want to to get tannins from the grain. I get greedy with sparging so I feel the need to mash out and sparge at a higher temp. What precautions can I take to prevent leeching of tannins?
__________________

"I feel sorry for people who don't drink. They wake up in the morning and that's as good as they're going to feel all day." -Dean Martin

Quote:
Originally Posted by TheFlyingBeer
...no sense hauling empty carboys around when full ones take up just as much space. :)
Grimsawyer is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-01-2008, 02:39 PM   #4
jdoiv
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
jdoiv's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Nashville, TN
Posts: 1,149
Default

The main thing to watch when your fly sparging to avoid tannin extraction is going to be mash pH and temp of your sparge water. Use some 5.2 in your mash (base it upon the amount of pre-boil volume you expect) and don't worry about the sparge water. The 5.2 should buffer the pH during the sparge just fine. Keep the sparge water around 170*F and you'll be fine. Run the sparge for an hour and stop when you either get to 1.008 or your pre-boil volume, which ever comes first.

__________________
Drinking on the keg: BPA, Brown Ale, Dry Mead, Wee Heavy aged on Oak, CAP
Drinking in the Bottle:
Conditioning:
Fermenting:
Planning:
jdoiv is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-01-2008, 02:48 PM   #5
FSR402
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
FSR402's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Jenison, MI
Posts: 2,880
Liked 16 Times on 14 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by shafferpilot
So long as you keep the temp right, you're good. Out of curiosity why the switch?
+1
What is your brew day not long enough for you?
__________________
TWO FISTED BREWING CO.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mr_cad View Post
Its nice when you and your friends have comparable equipment.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Walker-san View Post
some people will tap anything that has a hole.
Buy Two Fisted Brewing gear
FSR402 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-01-2008, 04:37 PM   #6
Lil' Sparky
Cowboys EAC
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Lil' Sparky's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Honolulu, HI
Posts: 4,013
Liked 50 Times on 33 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Grimsawyer
March pumps are a serious pain in the @$$!!! Tired of priming the pump.
Man, that's too bad. I love my new single-tier + pump w/ QDs! Batch sparging was a breeze and priming the pump wasn't too difficult, although I agree, it would be really nice if we had a hi-temp/food safe/self-priming pump we could use.
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by duffman2 View Post
I dub this beer the Double Slutty Triple Nutty Bodacious Booty Brunette!
Lil' Sparky is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-01-2008, 07:05 PM   #7
ajf
Senior Member
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
ajf's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Long Island
Posts: 4,643
Liked 99 Times on 93 Posts
Likes Given: 39

Default

In my experience, fly sparge times depend on the gravity of the brew. Higher gravities require longer sparges, or result in lower efficiencies. With my beers, I sparge for about 60 minutes for beers with an OG of about 1.050 (I hardly ever go below that), but I extend it to 90 minutes for beers with an OG of 1.065, and longer for higher gravities. I try to stop the sparge when I get the required volume into the kettle, or when the gravity of the runnings drops below 1.008 (whichever comes first). Usually, I get the required volume by the time the gravity of the runnings drops to about 1.008 - 1.012, but I do screw up occasionally.
Tannin extraction depends on three factors:
Temperature (higher temps extract more tannins)
pH (higher pH allows more tannins to be extracted)
Time (longer sparge times tend to extract more tannins if the temperature and pH are too high).
Stopping the sparge when the gravity drops to about 1.008 - 1.010, not only stops you wasting time, but also helps to control the pH of the sparge. By the time the gravity drops to this point, the pH of the sparge has increased to the point where excess tannin extraction is a definite possibility. Acidifying the sparge water with gypsum or pH 5.2 makes this less likely.
For temperature, I try to keep the sparge between 165 - 170 degrees. This is hot enough to effectively rinse the sugars out of the grain, but not so hot that it extracts excessive tannins.
Paying attention to the gravity / pH, and temperature seems to work very well for me, and I have not noticed tannins in the brew even with 2 hour sparges.

Hope this helps.

-a.

__________________
ajf is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-02-2008, 12:19 PM   #8
EinGutesBier
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Mandan, ND
Posts: 608
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default

Uh oh. 60-90 minutes for fly sparging? May I ask why it would take that long? Is it because of vorlaufing?

The reason I ask is that I did a beer that had a projected OG of 1.068 and I must've done my sparge, vorlaufing included, in about half an hour. I just vorlauf until the wort runs about as clear as I can get it, then try to replace the wort I'm transferring to the kettle with water at an even rate.

Have I done something wrong?

__________________
EinGutesBier is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-02-2008, 01:13 PM   #9
ajf
Senior Member
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
ajf's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Long Island
Posts: 4,643
Liked 99 Times on 93 Posts
Likes Given: 39

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by EinGutesBier
Uh oh. 60-90 minutes for fly sparging? May I ask why it would take that long? Is it because of vorlaufing?

The reason I ask is that I did a beer that had a projected OG of 1.068 and I must've done my sparge, vorlaufing included, in about half an hour. I just vorlauf until the wort runs about as clear as I can get it, then try to replace the wort I'm transferring to the kettle with water at an even rate.

Have I done something wrong?
The vorlauf only takes me a few minutes. If you achieved your projected OG, then obviously you haven't done anything wrong.
All I can say is that with my equipment and procedures, I couldn't achieve an OG of 1.068 without a sparge of about 90 minutes, and would leave a large amount of unextracted sugars if I completed a fly sparge in 30 minutes with that amount of grain.

-a.
__________________
ajf is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-02-2008, 01:20 PM   #10
EinGutesBier
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Mandan, ND
Posts: 608
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default

I recall when I cleaned out my MLT, most of the grain had its sweetness leached from it. To extend the the fly sparge, you'd just trickle the water in more slowly or would you simply give it more time to sit before draining the wort?

__________________
EinGutesBier is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Sparging dbailey1986 Introductions 3 04-08-2009 10:34 PM
Sparging McCuckerson Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 7 10-30-2008 01:11 AM
Fly Sparging Vs. Batch Sparging New2HomeBrew All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 28 08-08-2007 06:25 PM
sparging skaboyd All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 9 08-01-2006 10:58 PM
Sparging beerfan All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 3 06-09-2006 06:44 AM



Newest Threads

LATEST SPONSOR DEALS