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junior 08-24-2012 12:34 AM

First Crush
 
1 Attachment(s)
Hey everyone, I did my first crush today with my new Barley Crusher set at the factory setting of .039, to me it seems to be on the fine side compare to the crushed grains I get order online, what does it look like to you veterans crushers? Here are some pictures, hope they can help. I have one more question, I was in my local beer supply store and they had 50lb bags of Crisp Ale Malt, I asked the worker if they had 2row, and he told me that the ale malt is the same thing, is that true, and if not can I substitute it for 2row?

junior 08-24-2012 01:24 AM

2 Attachment(s)
Here are some more pictures, that I uploaded, I tried to post these on the first post, but the files wouldn't upload.

Bigcorona 08-24-2012 01:30 AM

The crush looks great. Crisp is the name of a malting company. I would say what they suggested would substitute for 2-row (likely it is 2-row), just a little more expensive than generic 2-row.

Yooper 08-24-2012 01:33 AM

I go a little tighter on my barley crusher, so I have it crushed even more, but yours looks pretty good.

Brew-boy 08-24-2012 01:51 AM

I would close the gap some, I have mine set at .035 which is perfect for my system.

kingwood-kid 08-24-2012 02:39 AM

Just keep tightening your gap a little bit at a time until the husks don't look like that anymore, then go back one step. I have a corona mill, so I have no idea what the gap is, but the idea is the same.

2-row is actually a description of the way the grain is arranged on the plant. Make it into soup, caramelize it, cook it to 600 Lovibond, it's still 2-row. Crisp is a British malting company. Their malt is just a little darker than Canadian/American malts, but should work fine anyplace you would use 2-row, maybe even a little more flavorful.

Monkfish 08-24-2012 02:44 AM

Looks pretty good to me. I have a BC and stuck with the factory gap for a couple of batches and then tightened things up a bit. For me .037" has given me great results and no shredded husks.

TrubDog 08-24-2012 02:49 AM

+1 for .035 - gets my efficiency into the 80's. It's amazing what .004 will do!

borden 08-24-2012 04:32 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kingwood-kid (Post 4356848)
2-row is actually a description of the way the grain is arranged on the plant. Make it into soup, caramelize it, cook it to 600 Lovibond, it's still 2-row. Crisp is a British malting company. Their malt is just a little darker than Canadian/American malts, but should work fine anyplace you would use 2-row, maybe even a little more flavorful.

Yep. I think you'll be satisfied with the Crisp purchase -- I haven't used their Pale Ale Malt, but I'm generally fond of slightly darker or more robust base malts like Marris Otter, Golden Promise, or even domestic Pale Ale malt from companies like Rahr.

In short: you have a great type of 2-Row!

RM-MN 08-24-2012 11:03 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by junior (Post 4356460)
Hey everyone, I did my first crush today with my new Barley Crusher set at the factory setting of .039, to me it seems to be on the fine side compare to the crushed grains I get order online, what does it look like to you veterans crushers? Here are some pictures, hope they can help. I have one more question, I was in my local beer supply store and they had 50lb bags of Crisp Ale Malt, I asked the worker if they had 2row, and he told me that the ale malt is the same thing, is that true, and if not can I substitute it for 2row?

If you were selling crushed grain for brewing would you adjust your crusher for the finest crush that could be mashed or would you set it a little coarser so that none of your customers complain about stuck sparges from having the grain crushed to fine? Remember that you are also selling grain and if the beer turns out good but takes a little more grain because the efficiency isn't the best will the customer complain about the extra few ounces of grain they need to buy? Your crusher seems to be set OK or perhaps a little coarse. Try a batch. If you get a stuck sparge, spread the rollers a bit. If it sparges just fine, try closing the gap for the next batch.


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