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Old 03-31-2012, 02:03 AM   #1
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Default First All Grain Brew

Hello All,

I've been reading this forum for quite a while but just joined, and while I have done some extract batches I want to try all grain for the first time. I wanted to share my recipe and hop schedule to get feedback as well as ask if anyone knows of a good equipment kit with the essentials or where to get a relatively cheap 6-8 gallon brew kettle. This will be a five gallon batch going for a red ipa.

8 lbs. Two-Row
2 lbs. Munich
1 lb. 80L Crystal
1 lb chocolate (too much to create a nice red color? Too little?

Chinook 1 oz. 60 min
Simcoe .5 oz 20 min
Nugget .5 oz 7 min

Safale US-05 11.5g for yeast

Any feedback would be greatly appreciated as well as any general tips someone all grain brewing for the first time should know.

Thanks

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Old 03-31-2012, 02:39 AM   #2
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A pound of chocolate malt takes it up 31 SRM according to Beersmith, which is way too dark. Personally I would use no more than 4 oz of chocolate malt. I am doing an American amber with only 2 oz of chocolate malt, plus some other coloring agents and I am at 18 SRM, which is right in the middle of the style range for an amber. The hops look pretty good, but I might use the simcoe towards the end to get more aroma from it.

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Old 03-31-2012, 02:42 AM   #3
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Originally Posted by forstmeister View Post
A pound of chocolate malt takes it up 31 SRM according to Beersmith, which is way too dark. Personally I would use no more than 4 oz of chocolate malt. I am doing an American amber with only 2 oz of chocolate malt, plus some other coloring agents and I am at 18 SRM, which is right in the middle of the style range for an amber. The hops look pretty good, but I might use the simcoe towards the end to get more aroma from it.
Thanks! I wouldn't want it that dark so I will definitely scale back the chocolate malt. Do you I should put the simcoe in at the 7 minute mark and keep the other two additions the same? Or move it around to have a more even distribution?
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Old 03-31-2012, 02:53 AM   #4
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Yeah, I wouldn't use more than 2 oz of the chocolate... heck, if you left it out completely, you'd still get a nice red color, but a little of the stuff goes a long way.

As for the hops, I'd do simcoe at flameout, but I love me some simcoe.

Get Beersmith... best $20.00 investment you can make in brewing.

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Old 03-31-2012, 03:15 AM   #5
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Since your recipe questions have already been answered, I'll offer some advice on equipment for moving to all-grain. Get yourself a 10g kettle like this one...

http://www.restaurantsupplypro.com/p...-40/stock-pots

and a bag from this guy (or make your own) and do all-grain brew-in-a-bag (BIAB).

Unless you've got your heart set on the traditional MLT approach to all-grain or are planning on 10g batches, BIAB is a very cost efficient way to move from extract to all-grain with the same results, plus you can mill your grain extra fine to get 80+% efficiency and never worry about a stuck sparge and there's less equipment to buy, store, and clean. The only other thing you may need is a propane burner setup to handle the in-kettle mashing and full volume boils. I've only been brewing a short time, but I've never brewed with extract and have only done all-grain BIAB and love how easy it is.

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Old 03-31-2012, 03:27 AM   #6
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Originally Posted by LLBeanJ View Post
Since your recipe questions have already been answered, I'll offer some advice on equipment for moving to all-grain. Get yourself a 10g kettle like this one...

http://www.restaurantsupplypro.com/p...-40/stock-pots

and a bag from this guy (or make your own) and do all-grain brew-in-a-bag (BIAB).

Unless you've got your heart set on the traditional MLT approach to all-grain or are planning on 10g batches, BIAB is a very cost efficient way to move from extract to all-grain with the same results, plus you can mill your grain extra fine to get 80+% efficiency and never worry about a stuck sparge and there's less equipment to buy, store, and clean. The only other thing you may need is a propane burner setup to handle the in-kettle mashing and full volume boils. I've only been brewing a short time, but I've never brewed with extract and have only done all-grain BIAB and love how easy it is.
Thanks for mentioning this. I have looked at BIAB and think it would be a great idea. I dont have a propane burner and was planning on using a stove top for a five gallon batch. I know it wont be quick to get the temp up but it is possible right? I mean it shouldnt harm the brew at will it? Also I was thinking about going to home depot and getting some paint strainer bags for the grain...I have seen the hops placed in bags as well, anyone have an opinion on that?
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Old 03-31-2012, 04:41 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dandw12786
Yeah, I wouldn't use more than 2 oz of the chocolate... heck, if you left it out completely, you'd still get a nice red color, but a little of the stuff goes a long way.

As for the hops, I'd do simcoe at flameout, but I love me some simcoe.


Get Beersmith... best $20.00 investment you can make in brewing.
Beersmith is awesome. I spend a lot of time just creating recipes for fun to see what I come up with.

Also, simcoe at flameout is a good call.
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Old 03-31-2012, 06:48 AM   #8
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I agree on the chocolate. Use 2-4 oz. If you are looking for an ipa, ibus are important, but it is more about hop flavor/aroma than ibus in my opinion. 2 oz will not do that, especially with no dryhop. The 60 min is probably good, but I usually use at least another oz each at 15, 5, flameout, and no less than 2 oz for dryhop.

On another note, if you buy hops in bulk or semi bulk, it is much cheaper and will reduce costs of ipas a lot. I buy a lot from famhousebrewingsupply.com. he does 4oz increments pretty cheap. A lot of common ones like cascade/columbus/Willamette/etc are around $0.75 an oz, and shipping is cheap.

Also, for a 1st AG brew, mash temp is critical. Beersmith will help a lot with hitting the temps.

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Old 03-31-2012, 08:24 AM   #9
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Thanks to everyone who offered tips, i appreciate it. Ive looked at a few kits, but they all seem excessive for BIAB. Im under the impression this is all I would need for BIAB. Please let me know what I'm missing. This is all for a five gallon batch.

8-10 Gallon Brew Kettle
Voile bag that kettle fits into (I was looking at paint strainer bags at Home Depot for this)
Some kind of false bottom to keep the bag from touching the bottom of the kettle.
Thermometer
Hydrometer
Siphon to transport wort from kettle to carboy
6 gallon carboy?
second carboy for secondary fermentation (Is this necessary)

I know that is a lot of questions but any help would be greatly appreciated.

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Old 03-31-2012, 02:53 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mrwongburger
Thanks to everyone who offered tips, i appreciate it. Ive looked at a few kits, but they all seem excessive for BIAB. Im under the impression this is all I would need for BIAB. Please let me know what I'm missing. This is all for a five gallon batch.

8-10 Gallon Brew Kettle
Voile bag that kettle fits into (I was looking at paint strainer bags at Home Depot for this)
Some kind of false bottom to keep the bag from touching the bottom of the kettle.
Thermometer
Hydrometer
Siphon to transport wort from kettle to carboy
6 gallon carboy?
second carboy for secondary fermentation (Is this necessary)

I know that is a lot of questions but any help would be greatly appreciated.
While not always necessary, I always do secondary fermentation for the added clarity. You can use buckets for that if you dont want to buy another carboy.
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