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Old 10-19-2010, 05:12 AM   #1
HackInBlack
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Default First All-Grain BIAB

Since I don't have the equipment for all-grain, or the means to buy the equipment yet, I am trying my first all-grain as a BIAB. I've read a lot of the threads on BIAB, but I have a question about the recipe in Beersmith.

When I enter it as an All-Grain recipe, I then select the Single Infusion, Full Body choice under Mash Profile. I then get a Mash In and Mash Out description. My question is this (as I am a total noob at all-grain terminology): when Beersmith tells me for Mash In to "add x qts. of water at y degrees" then has a step temp 10 degrees lower, does that mean I hit the grain with the initial water at y degrees then let it drop and hold it at the step temp for the allotted time? Thanks for answering a question that is probably obvious to most everyone else.

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Old 10-19-2010, 06:00 AM   #2
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If you're doing true Aussie style full volume, no sparge , BIAB, you probably want to use Single Infusion, Full Body, No Mash Out.

I do a batch sparge, so I choose Single Infusion, Full Body, Batch Sparge and calculate my sparge water volume and temps myself

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Old 10-19-2010, 07:03 AM   #3
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As for your question, you sort of have it right. Beersmith calculates the temperature of the strike water for you to hit the temperature you want to mash at. It is really kind of magical. Remember that your grain is at 70 degrees or whatever, and when you add it to the hot water it will cool the water a bit. Beersmith tells you what temperature your strike water must be given your initial grain temperature, how much grain you are using, and, if you know it, the details of your mash tun to make you hit your mash temp when you add the grains to the preheated water. And it is VERY accurate. I have never been off by even a degree when using it. Amazing, really.

I just did my first BIAB today. It really went very well. I can't believe I haven't tried this before-- only need 1 vessel, cleanup is easier, and my efficiency went UP, not down as I expected. I got, and I can hardly believe this myself, 87% efficiency to the kettle (and then way less in actual brewhouse efficiency due to the massive amount of wort I had to leave behind). I achieved this by pressing on the grain bag-- yes I have read the threads out there about tannin extraction, but I think it sounds like a bunch of hooey. Unless I am squeezing so hard I change the pH or raise the temperature, I can't imagine how I am getting all sorts of tannins in there.

BIAB is so much easier than my previous setup, which was a false bottom on my kettle so it could be used like a mash tun, and then a batch sparge. I had to then clean out the kettle, add on my hopstopper (which won't fit under a false bottom), then transfer the wort back to the kettle (involving lots of spashing and running the risk of HSA). I am very very pleased with BIAB. We'll see how it turns out, though.

Klaus

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Old 10-19-2010, 05:02 PM   #4
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At some point I will probably get another Kettle, but think I will still use the BIAB method of mashing with the entire water amount, then just run that out into my Boil Kettle. Main reason is that I don't have an easy way to set up a hook to drain the bag and holding the bag long enough for it to drain is a PITA, and I already have a double burner cooker that can hold 2 kettles, so there is no needed expense there. Plus having 2 boilmakers is cooler than having one

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Old 10-19-2010, 05:14 PM   #5
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Yes, holding the bag is not fun. What I have done is put a barbeque grate over my kettle then stick the still dripping grain bag into a colander suspended on top of the grate over the wort as it heats to boiling. The hopstopper is already in there, so it is just lift out, turn on the fire and let it drain (I also squeeze a bit). Less expense than a new boilermaker, less cleanup, no need to transfer. But I, too, wish I had 2 boil kettles just to look cool! Alas, I cannot justify the expense.

The next thing I am going to buy is another bucket so I can do an inverted "zap pap" (the bucket with holes on the outside and the bag of grains between the buckets) to give the bag a good constant squeeze of whatever pressure I desire by just filling the inside bucket with water. When sitting on the grill grate, this should be fantastic.

Klaus

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Old 10-20-2010, 02:31 AM   #6
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What are the advantages/disadvantages of doing a mash out at the end. I don't care if it's authentic Aussie style, I just want a good mash that will produce a quality wort. I have two brewpots and was going to do a 2/3 volume BIAB mash in and use the second pot to heat water for a 1/3 volume mash out in the larger pot and then boil away. Would that be any better/worse than a full volume mash with no mash out?

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Old 10-20-2010, 03:13 AM   #7
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a Mash out is used for fly sparging, to raise the temperature of the grain for an easier lauter, and to end enzymatic activity. It's pointless if you're batch sparging, where your sparges are going to raise the temp of the mash.

http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f36/batc...remash-184288/

Check that reference, as Bobby M was the one who explained it to me in detail months ago. I don't exactly remember ALL the reasons why a mash out is pointless in batch sparging, but I know I don't do it anymore.

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Old 10-20-2010, 03:19 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mikeysab View Post
a Mash out is used for fly sparging, to raise the temperature of the grain for an easier lauter, and to end enzymatic activity. It's pointless if you're batch sparging, where your sparges are going to raise the temp of the mash.

http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f36/batc...remash-184288/

Check that reference, as Bobby M was the one who explained it to me in detail months ago. I don't exactly remember ALL the reasons why a mash out is pointless in batch sparging, but I know I don't do it anymore.
it's not pointless for batch sparge. it makes for an easier mash out for rye and wheat. as i love wheat beers, i step-mash and mash out
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Old 10-20-2010, 04:31 AM   #9
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Well if you're talking about wheat and rye malts, then mash temps are not your only worries. If batch sparging a wheat or rye mash, where wheat or rye malt are your biggest percentage of malt, then the temp of the mash is not your biggest concern. You need to get something into the mash to seperate all that sticky mess, like rice hulls, or use BIAB. A "mash out" is the same as your first batch sparge. If you enjoy using a mash out, then that's your preference, but your first batch sparge does the same thing.

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Old 10-20-2010, 04:32 AM   #10
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Well, except for getting more wort out of the mash, which can be easily accounted for.

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