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Old 03-26-2013, 11:22 PM   #1
drjjunior
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Default First all grain

I made a half batch (2.5 gallons) last night and I used 5 lbs of golden wheat grain and .3 lbs of carapil. I believe, I might be mistaken. But either way my beer is a dirty brown color. I understand the dirty cloudy look. I can deal with that later but the brown color was unexpected. Are wheat beers usually a mud brown color

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Old 03-26-2013, 11:48 PM   #2
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What is "golden wheat grain"? What is the Lovibond of both of those? That will determine your color.


Regardless, I would let it be and see how it turns out. Who knows.

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Old 03-27-2013, 01:22 AM   #3
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The golden wheat. Is a grain at my shop that I picked out of the few other wheat grains they had. I'm thinking that maybe the carapils might have darkened the color too. I hope everything works out

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Old 03-27-2013, 02:35 AM   #4
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Yeah....it could be a guessing game without knowing the lovibond for everything. I bet it will wind up fine though!

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Old 03-27-2013, 03:42 AM   #5
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Carapils has minimal to no effect on color when used at 5% or less. I'm not sure what golden wheat is. I typically use white wheat when making wheat beers and get a light golden/straw like color wort and beer.

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Old 03-27-2013, 06:21 AM   #6
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Thanks. It carapils was 5.2% and what is lovibond

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Old 03-27-2013, 11:33 AM   #7
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Hold on for a moment, though. What sort of gravity did you get? AFAIK, some wheat malts aren't self-converting (not enough enzymes), and unmalted wheat won't convert at all, so if your grain bill is as given, you may not have converted enough starch to make a fermentable wort. Did you check the diastatic power of this 'golden wheat' ahead of time?

Also, wheat (whether malted or unmalted) has no hull to speak of, which means it won't form a grain bed by itself. Did you add rice hulls to the mash, and if not, did you have any trouble with sparging?

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Old 03-27-2013, 12:44 PM   #8
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Lovibond is a scale used to measure color. Grains are sometimes labeled with their degrees Lovibond, A dark roasted grain will be 500L. Regular 2-row will be around 2L. Wheat malts are usually 2-4L, from what I've seen, and Carapils is under 3L. So neither would have contributed to a brown SRM (standard reference method). This is the color system used to measure the color of finished beer and malts as well, which closely matches Lovibond colors.

Enough about color though, the previous poster has a point. Although you can certainly make an all wheat beer, many recipes call for barley malt as well. Malted wheat will convert itself and then some, but since it has no hulls, you need something to help with a grain bed, unless you BIAB. Some common wheat recipe use a 50/50 or 60/40 wheat-to-2row ratio. People also regularly use rice hulls to prevent a stuck sparge. Also, wheat itself already contributes greatly to body and head retention, so the Carapils was not necessary.

Find out what golden wheat is exactly. Is it malted wheat or not? What Lovibond is it? This will help you find out if you're even making beer and why it's so dark.

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Old 03-27-2013, 01:11 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by drjjunior View Post
what is lovibond
Degrees Lovibond is the unit used to measure the potential color affect of a given malt or adjunct. It corresponds to the color of the finished beer given in SRM (Standard Reference Method) units. For example, 1 pound of a 10 °L malt can be expected to given 1 gallon of water a 10 SRM hue.

While SRM is strictly speaking an empirical measurement unit, it is possible to predict the color of a beer ahead of time. To calculate the expected SRM of a beer, you take the sum of the malt color for each addition times the weight in pounds, and divide that sum by the volume in gallons. For example, if your golden wheat has a color of 2 °L (which is about typical for a wheat malt), and the carapils is 1.5 °L (again, about typical for that malt) then the SRM of your beer would be:

((2°L * 5lb) + (1.5°L * 0.3lb)) / 2.5 gal
(10 + 0.45) / 2.5
10.45 / 2.5
4.18 SRM

This is a rather light-colored beer, a little darker than, say, Budweiser, much lighter than what you describe. However, you have to recall that a) you are looking at it through the whole 2.5 gallons of it, and b) it is still fermenting, which means a lot of yeast is still in suspension in it. Once it clears, and you have a chance to look at it through a narrower glass, it should come out quite pale.

Most brewing software will automatically estimate the SRM of the beer for you.
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Old 03-27-2013, 08:39 PM   #10
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I had just dropped it about an hour before I could get a reading on it so I have no idea. As for the BIAB. Yes, I did.

I didn't have rice hulls.

I am guessing I will end up doing this batch differently after a little more research. The sediment settled down and the color looks better. Closer to a golden color then brown now. But like was said earlier. It might not be .

should I risk tasting it or no

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