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Old 03-13-2013, 02:30 AM   #1
JBeuchs
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Default Extended mash times

Has anyone experimented with mash times in excess of 60 minutes? I've read some material indicating a slightly increased efficiency numbers with 90 minute mashes. Any thought?

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Old 03-13-2013, 02:36 AM   #2
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How about - it depends.

If you have 100% conversion at 60 minutes, you can't get any increase in efficiency.


If you are less than 100% conversion, then you'll continue to convert as long as you hold the temp. The crush at my local homebrew shop hits the low 90's in 60 minutes and will be 99% at 90.

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Old 03-13-2013, 02:39 AM   #3
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I usually do a 75 or 90 minute mash on beers that I either want to finish really dry or where I am using a less attenuative yeast. I am not sure how much it affects efficiency, but it does seem to help lower my final gravity.

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Old 03-13-2013, 02:56 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by billl View Post
How about - it depends.

If you have 100% conversion at 60 minutes, you can't get any increase in efficiency.


If you are less than 100% conversion, then you'll continue to convert as long as you hold the temp. The crush at my local homebrew shop hits the low 90's in 60 minutes and will be 99% at 90.
99% efficiency? That is amazing if it is true.
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Old 03-13-2013, 03:45 AM   #5
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I am new to all grain (I've got 2 batches under my belt). My efficiency is in the 65-70% range. I'd like it to be more like 75-80%. I think the screen I use in my mash tun may be at least part of the problem. I've seen different recipes call for 60 min mashes and others 90 minutes. I guess I wasn't sure what the pros/cons were.

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Old 03-13-2013, 04:34 AM   #6
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Effiency is potential SG vs what's in your fermenter. Conversion can be 100% (I don't know that it is) and you still have sparge and equipment losses to lower efficiency.

I biab and use a longer mash time (90 m) to ensure the amylase(s) have time to chew the carbs in the dilute environment of full volume biab.

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Old 03-13-2013, 01:12 PM   #7
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"99% efficiency? That is amazing if it is true."

Just to clarify, that is 99% conversion efficiency. Anyone with a good crush is getting 99% efficiency in under 60 minutes. Anyone with a mediocre crush generally isn't. That is why people report such large brewhouse efficiency jumps when they start milling finer. If you only start out with 90% conversion, that would change an 80% brewhouse down to a 70%.

In terms of fermentability, that is highly temp dependant. If you are mashing in a temp where Beta is working well (under 152), that will continue to break down the larger sugars as well as the starch. If you are at a much higher temp, Beta slows way down and alpha dominates. A long rest at alpha temps won't necessarily produce a much more fermentable wort.

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Old 03-13-2013, 01:31 PM   #8
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The diastatic power of your intended base malt, other fermentables in the grist, and targeted mash temp(s) also comes into play here. I suggest reading up on this more if you want to improve efficiency (in select cases) with an extended mash time.

http://byo.com/all-grain-brewing/item/1497-the-science-of-step-mashing

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Old 03-13-2013, 04:14 PM   #9
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I mash longer than 60 minutes because it makes my brew day easier. After dinner I heat my strike water and mash in, usually by 7:00. Then I get the kids ready for bed and read books with them. By the time I get back to the garage it's usually 8-8:15. But it means I'll be boiling by 9 and done by 10:30 instead of midnight

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Old 03-13-2013, 05:48 PM   #10
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This isn't an issue of efficiency- 90% of homebrewers are getting full conversion, and most of those in teh first 20m of the mash. Mashing for longer will give you a more fermentable wort as the amylases continue to work on the already converted sugars in the mash, breaking them down into smaller and more easily fermentable sugars.

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