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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing > Effects of a Low Boil on Clarity?
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Old 01-08-2013, 08:21 PM   #1
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Default Effects of a Low Boil on Clarity?

I have hear many brewers say that they try to keep the boil down to a minimum to reduce evaporation loss. In other words, not a rapid boil.

I have tried this on my last few batches and I am finding out that my beers are really cloudy going into the keg. I do full boils and use warflock and a submersion chiller. I assume that I am not getting as good of a hot break. I do not secondary my beers, unless they are lagers, but I do an extended primary fermentation.

Any thoughts, my beers are taking forever to clear.

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Old 01-08-2013, 08:38 PM   #2
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Hello. My understanding is that a rolling boil and open (as opposed to covered) boil removes DMS (Dimethyl Sulfides) which can produce some off flavors and cloudiness... Not 100% sure on the cloudiness with DMS... I always start with a 7.5 gal boil and reduce to approx 5.5 gals after a 90 min boil.
There are several chemicals (from the chemical reactions of the mash, etc) that will boil off from a rolling and open boil from what I have read, so I always go.with this process. It has served me well.
I can't remember the names of what all boils out.. I'm sure if you searched "What is boiled" or something to that effect you will learn a lot. Gotta love Homebrewtalk.com!
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Old 01-08-2013, 08:49 PM   #3
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Hello. My understanding is that a rolling boil and open (as opposed to covered) boil removes DMS (Dimethyl Sulfides) which can produce some off flavors and cloudiness... Not 100% sure on the cloudiness with DMS... I always start with a 7.5 gal boil and reduce to approx 5.5 gals after a 90 min boil.
There are several chemicals (from the chemical reactions of the mash, etc) that will boil off from a rolling and open boil from what I have read, so I always go.with this process. It has served me well.
I can't remember the names of what all boils out.. I'm sure if you searched "What is boiled" or something to that effect you will learn a lot. Gotta love Homebrewtalk.com!
~Cheers

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Old 01-08-2013, 08:49 PM   #4
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I'm pretty sure that I have not been getting as much of the hot break material, mostly proteins I assume, to drop out. I didn't have this issue until recently, so I am going to go back to my old method of a more vigorous boil.

I do boil with the lid off the kettle and have never had a DMS issue, even with lagers.

I am wondering if a protein rest in my mash will help as well?

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Old 01-08-2013, 08:52 PM   #5
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If you're worried about a poor hot break why not just open it up to start, get a rocking hot break and then dial it down? A kind of middle of the road approach.

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Old 01-08-2013, 09:40 PM   #6
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The cloudiness is likely protien... a protien rest may help.

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Old 01-09-2013, 05:30 AM   #7
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It has been my experience that a good rolling boil is best. Adjusting your profile for your equipment( if you're using brewing software) to account for evaporation loss and adjusting the recipe for the intended OG and volume is better than modifying your boil vigor. There are other factors too such as grain types, yeast type, and temperature( just to name a few) that will affect how clear the final beer is. Do you have the ability to cold crash before kegging? That may help also.

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Old 01-09-2013, 05:57 AM   #8
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I've never heard that a low boil is good. I've always read that a vigorous boil is the correct boil. I mean, the boil kettle shouldn't be rocking, but I've always been taught that a rolling boil is required. Evaporative losses just are- if you live in the desert you may really have a lot of loss- but unless you're boiling off so much that you're burning through a ton of propane and caramelizing your wort, you really can't boil "too hard".

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Old 01-09-2013, 02:15 PM   #9
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I was taught to do the vigorous boil as well.
I found right off that you can get too vigorous, but I was outside when the overflow happened.
But I keep it rocking when doing a boil. You just have to learn how much to compensate.

pb

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Old 01-09-2013, 02:40 PM   #10
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There was a question about boil intensity a week ago and kaiser answered it so thoroughly that I'll just repost. It was exactly the same post but commented on it anyways.

Quote:
In boiling we are looking for 5 "-ations" to be done:

- sterilization - you are getting this as long as the wort comes to a boil for a few minutes. It's not sterilization in the truest meaning, but you get the idea.

- volatilization - this is the removal of unwanted flavor compounds, most notably DMS (cooked corn smell). You don't get this with a simmer. At least ~10% evaporation is needed for this on the home brew scale. Big breweries may be able to do this with additional equipment that forces evaporation w/o boiling.

- evaporation - this removes water and increases the gravity of the wort. you are looking for 10-15% of the starting volume

- isomerization - this creates bitterness and you get this even if the wort only simmers

- coagulation - precipitates proteins from the wort. You also get this with a simple simmer but the moving action of a good boil will allow for larger flocks to form.


So yes, use that outdoor burner for your wort boil. But remember more is not always better. Too much heat can also burn you wort. You want 10-15% evaporation per hour.
For context http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f128/low...issues-378160/

I guess the coagulation and evaporation comments are most pertinent.
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