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-   -   Dough in temps what is it? (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f36/dough-temps-what-20197/)

Gregg Meyer 01-22-2007 03:26 AM

Dough in temps what is it?
 
Friend gave me his notes on a recipe. He is experianced I am not. My first all grain sesson was Saturday, 20th Jan 07 On the recipe it says to calc the dough in temp with promash. I have promash on order and will start learning faster when it hits my door, I bought the cd instead of just the download. I have the down load on my puter. Anyway How do you calc dough in temp? what is it? and is it super important, it is too late in the evening to call to bother my teacher.

Thanks


Gregg

RichBrewer 01-22-2007 03:39 AM

Dough in temp is the temperature of the water used in your mash. When grain is added to the water the temperature will drop so you have to compensate for this. Pro Mash will do this for you or there is a table in Charlie P's book that will help you estimate. He says there is a 16 to 18 degree drop when the grains are added. If you want to mash at 154 degrees you will heat your water to 170 to 172 degrees. Pro mash uses the grain temp and the amount of mash in water to more accurately calculate the temperature.
You will also want to figure in the heat loss due to your Mash Tun. It will absorb heat from the hot water and it is very easy to undershoot your strike temp. I add nearly boiling water to my tun to pre heat it then dump it before the mash water is added. I also add a couple degrees to the strike temperature and then let the temp fall to the desired strike. I will then add the grains.

Gregg Meyer 01-22-2007 03:49 AM

yesterday we heated the mash tun water to 175 we then added 11 lbs of grist.

The temps dropped to right above 154, i added maybe 1/2 cup of 52 degree tap water and the temp was a perfect 154. i then made sure we mixed it well after that also and the pot kept the 154 temp the whole time, the pot is a thick ss pot that does keep the heat in well.

I have the book, charlie P's and th promash just not sure how to find and utilize all it can do. How did the midevil folks ever bre beer without all the stuff we have today? They were pretty damn smart to get it done in there world.

Thanks for the lesson!

Gregg,;)

RichBrewer 01-22-2007 03:51 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gregg Meyer
I have the book, charlie P's and th promash just not sure how to find and utilize all it can do. How did the midevil folks ever bre beer without all the stuff we have today? They were pretty damn smart to get it done in there world.

Gregg,;)

I'm thinking their beers may not have been as good as what we have now. Wouldn't it be fun though to actually taste some?

Orfy 01-22-2007 06:18 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gregg Meyer
How did the midevil folks ever bre beer without all the stuff we have today? They were pretty damn smart to get it done in there world.

Thanks for the lesson!

Gregg,;)

Early "able" brewers used decotion mashing.

Taking a percentage of the mash and boiling it then adding it back. It was a way to get the required results without thermometers. Before that they either took a bunch of starchy stuff let it get warm then let it ferment. (This converted starch to sugar and natural airborne yeast did its bit)
Or they just took a bunch of sugary stuff added it to water, left it around for the natural yeast to ferment and then drank it.
Early brews would of been nothing like out Beer, they were milky sweet concoctions with no head co2 or anything.

Hell, animals in Africa get pissed on fallen fruit that has fermented.
Have you ever seen a pissed Girrafe? Very funny. Baboons are plain scary when pissed.

Sir Humpsalot 01-22-2007 06:46 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by orfy
Hell, animals in Africa get pissed on fallen fruit that has fermented.
Have you ever seen a pissed Girrafe? Very funny. Baboons are plain scary when pissed.

It's worth renting "Animals are Beautiful people" just for the drunk mammals scenes. And, of course, if you and SWMBO enjoy getting frisky to animal documentaries, then you'll even have an extra incentive to rent it. ;)

Orfy 01-22-2007 08:54 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Toot
It's worth renting "Animals are Beautiful people" just for the drunk mammals scenes. And, of course, if you and SWMBO enjoy getting frisky to animal documentaries, then you'll even have an extra incentive to rent it. ;)

Boy, that's an OLD film. If irst saw that when I lived in South Africa in the eighties.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0071143/

YOU NEED TO WATCH THIS.

http://www.amazon.com/Animals-Are-Be...=digital-video

Schlenkerla 01-22-2007 12:52 PM

Really
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by orfy
Early "able" brewers used decotion mashing.

Taking a percentage of the mash and boiling it then adding it back. It was a way to get the required results without thermometers. Before that they either took a bunch of starchy stuff let it get warm then let it ferment. (This converted starch to sugar and natural airborne yeast did its bit)
Or they just took a bunch of sugary stuff added it to water, left it around for the natural yeast to ferment and then drank it.
Early brews would of been nothing like out Beer, they were milky sweet concoctions with no head co2 or anything.

Hell, animals in Africa get pissed on fallen fruit that has fermented.
Have you ever seen a pissed Girrafe? Very funny. Baboons are plain scary when pissed.

Darn it, I though they stuck some fools hand into the pot and counted how long until he screamed. I suppose they stopped doing that after they had to get the fool was liquoured up for the next step. I guess it only worked once unless you can get another sober fool. :D

Interesting, I wondered how they could do this without thermometers.


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