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Old 12-01-2008, 09:32 PM   #1
nate0075
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Default "Dough-In" method

I just got a converted igloo cooler from a buddy so Im going to attempt an oatmeal stout for the winter using an all grain recipe. Its my first all grain attempt, Ive been doing mini mashes for a while now. Ive been reading up on it and am now overwhelmed with techniques and tips. One thing I did however pickup on was the way to introduce the grains to the water. They said to soak the grains in water at 120 degrees for about 20 minutes THEN steep your grains for 90 minutes. They called this the "dough-in method" and said it wasn't completely necessary, but got better enzyme yields. Whats everyone's thoughts on this? I know you have to do this with the oatmeal since its not malted, but should I do this with the grains too?

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Old 12-01-2008, 10:35 PM   #2
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Well ...... I'm the farthest from an expert on the subject, but I typically:

1) Pre-heat my mash tun (converted 10 gallon Rubbermaid cooler)
2) Add my crushed grain (AFTER draining out the water I pre-heated it with)
3) Add my water, using a mash rake to stir it up (average 12 quarts +/-)
4) Add either hot or cold water to fine tune my target mash temp (if necessary)
5) Don't worry .... Have a Home Brew !!!

I've NEVER soaked my grains at 120 degrees, but then all the beers I've made to date have been single infusion. My efficiencies have ranged from 75-88%, with the last dozen batches between 80-85%. YMMV

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Old 12-01-2008, 10:50 PM   #3
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I am even farther for an expert than he is, but I also preheat my mash tun to about 180. Once I hit to my strike temp I add the grains, slowly stirring them in. If beersmith is correct I should be at my mash temp...In my short career at all-grain, i have never soaked my grains...

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Old 12-01-2008, 10:57 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nate0075 View Post
I just got a converted igloo cooler from a buddy so Im going to attempt an oatmeal stout for the winter using an all grain recipe. Its my first all grain attempt, Ive been doing mini mashes for a while now. Ive been reading up on it and am no overwhlemed with techniques and tips. One thing I did however pickup on was the way to introduce the grains to the water. They said to soak the grains in water at 120 degrees for about 20 minutes THEN steep your grains for 90 minutes. They called this the "dough-in method" and said it wasnt completely necessary, but got better enzyme yields. Whats everyone's thoughts on this? I know you have to do this with the oatmeal since its not malted, but should I do this with the grains too?
What are your sources and who are "they"? Your description sounds like a misunderstanding of "they" who provided the information or perhaps a misinterpretation on your part. "Dough in" is the mixing of the recipe's grains with hot water (the "strike water") to create the mash. It is all mixed in at one time. Most recipes and grains will use a single temperature mash in the area of 150F. Mulit-temperature infusions and decoction mashes will include stages starting at lower temps but that is not something to be concerned with now. For a stout all you need to do is mix your grains with enough hot water to get the mixture close to 150F. (I prefer 152F but anything from 148F to 155F will be just fine) Leave it for an hour at that temp and then sparge to collect your wort. There are FAQs and a Wiki at this site to give you plenty of tips but I would strongly suggest getting a good quality basic brewing book like "How to Brew" by John Palmer. Have fun and enjoy the beer.
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Old 12-01-2008, 11:04 PM   #5
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OK, on the bottom of the scale of experience, here goes nothin'. I also use a 10 gallon rubbermaid cooler with a false bottom as my MLT. I pre-heat the thing with the hottest tap water I have then add my strike water. I make sure the water coming out of the kettle is hotter than the temperature I want for my strike. (e.g., if I have 8.75 lbs. of grain and I'm using a 1.25 / 1 ratio, I heat water to 168+- to achieve 164 in the MLT for a final mash temp of 150-151.

My sources are Palmer, Beersmith, this fine forum and previous attempts to go it alone.

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Old 12-01-2008, 11:11 PM   #6
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[quote=Bulls Beers;984223In my short career at all-grain, i have never soaked my grains...[/quote]


I soak all my grain at between 147 to 154f for a minimum of 60 minutes all the time

Seriously though, you are doing a protien mash at those temps ( 120f ) and it really isn't needed for the well modified grain available today, unless you want what such a rest gives/takes away from you.

Most of us just do a single infusion at conversion temps and forget it.

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Old 12-02-2008, 12:08 AM   #7
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Quote:
I soak all my grain at between 147 to 154f for a minimum of 60 minutes all the time
Weird.. I do the same thing
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Old 12-02-2008, 02:53 AM   #8
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[QUOTE=BigEd;984239]What are your sources and who are "they"? Your description sounds like a misunderstanding of "they" who provided the information or perhaps a misinterpretation on your part. QUOTE]

Definately should have posted my source. I think Im trying to overcontemplate the process!

How to Brew - By John Palmer - Doughing-In

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Old 12-02-2008, 04:47 PM   #9
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my work internet block me from accessing Palmers website, so I reached behind me in my cubicle and grabbed my actual copy of the cabinet.

p144 - "The use of a 20 minute rest at termperatrues near 104 has been shown to be beneficial to improving the yield from the enzymatic results. This step is considered optional but can improve the yield by a couple points.

maybe it will take your preboil gravity from 1.054 to 1.056. Is that worth your time or could you just throw in another lb of base grain to your recipe.

With your first AG brew here don't worry about exacts. Just worry about going through the motions, getting as close to your mash temp as possible and see what kind of OG you come up with vs what your recipe says it should be.
Do you have brewing software? A great investment. I use Beersmith. Good luck, it will be great beer, just maybe 6% instead of 6.4% abv

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Old 12-06-2008, 06:08 AM   #10
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S/S kettle with FB, heat water to 168F, add grains, and apply heat if needed to adjust temp. Pretty simple.

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