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-   -   Double or Single Infusion? (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f36/double-single-infusion-33629/)

Justinnn 07-09-2007 08:37 PM

Double or Single Infusion?
 
I am going to be brewing a Witbeir(hoeggarden style) beer. I was wondering if I should try a double infusion for this recipe or stick with a single. Im not sure it the grains I am using will require a protein rest or not. Please direct me. Thank you
(note: this is only a 2.5 gallon batch, mash tun = 5 gallon Rubbermaid).
Grain:

2.5lbs Wheat Malt
2 Pils (2-Row)
.5lbs Belgium Munich Malt
2oz. Flaked Wheat
2oz. Rice Hulls
4oz. Flaked Rice
4oz. Cara-Pils

Hops:

.5 Czech Saaz (60min)
.25 Hallertauer (30min)
.25 Hallertauer (5min)

Flavorings:

1/2 tsp Coriander seed(crushed) (1min)
1/2 tsp Fresh Orange Zest (5min)

Yeast:

Wheinstephen Wyeast #3068


-Justin

Brew-boy 07-09-2007 08:42 PM

I did an American wheat using malted wheat and did a protein rest at 122f for 20 minutes than ramped it up to 152 for 60 minutes. Some people say you can skip this step but mine had 45% wheat in the grain bill so I felt better by doing a double infusion.

cubbies 07-09-2007 08:44 PM

Strongly depends on your setup. Dave Miller recommends that if you use a cooler MLT, that you never do a double infusion...I would have to agree at least to a certain extent. If you have a big enough cooler, a big enough brewpot and a handful of hours to watch wort boil, then I guess you could. Miller suggests that if you want to do double infusions then you should be using a metal mash tun, with a separate lauter tun, so that you can add heat directly to the tun to achieve the second infusion without having to add too much water.

Honestly, if you are wanting to do multiple rests, you should do a decoction IMO.

Evan! 07-09-2007 08:47 PM

With today's highly modified malts, you can get away with single, but I personally like step mashes. For some reason, I get higher efficiency when I rest at 133 for 30 minutes before the main sacc rest @ 152 for 45 mins. Also helps with yeast nutrients and head retention. But certainly not necessary.

I also mainly do direct-heated mashes in a kettle, so I don't have to add additional water infusions, I just turn the burner on. Makes step mashes much easier.

Big "A" 07-09-2007 08:57 PM

[QUOTE=Evan!]With today's highly modified malts, you can get away with single, but I personally like step mashes. For some reason, I get higher efficiency when I rest at 133 for 30 minutes before the main sacc rest @ 152 for 45 mins. Also helps with yeast nutrients and head retention. But certainly not necessary. [QUOTE]

:rockin: Man I thought I was by myself on here doing a step mash, I get much better efficiency numbers.

Justinnn 07-10-2007 04:52 PM

Now, If I were to do a step mash using the cooler, what water/grain ratio would be recommended for each step? I remember there being a post on here somewhere that answered this question. However, I cannot locate it.

cubbies 07-10-2007 05:51 PM

I dont have DM book in front of me, but I believe he said that if you are going to do a step infusion in a cooler MLT, you should start very thick, maybe even as thick as less than 1qt/lb of grain.

zoebisch01 07-10-2007 05:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Justinnn
Now, If I were to do a step mash using the cooler, what water/grain ratio would be recommended for each step? I remember there being a post on here somewhere that answered this question. However, I cannot locate it.

Yeah it has to be very thick to start, and you need a BIG cooler. I did a protein rest and then bumped to (iirc) around 148 or so in my 5 gallon, but it was to the rim.

cubbies 07-10-2007 05:59 PM

Would it be feasible to mash in your brewkettle and then lauter in your cooler? If that is possible, I think that is going to be your best bet. You could add your water at your normal ratio, say 1.25 qt/lb of grain...then you can do your steps in the kettle with the grain using short bursts of heat. After you have finished your mash you can dump the grain into your cooler (hot side aeration is really not that big of a concern on the homebrewer level), clean your kettle, make your first runnings and sparge.

That is probably how I would go about it.

bradsul 07-10-2007 06:09 PM

The steam infusion system posted by Flyguy looks really promising for doing cooler-based step mashes. I don't have a pressure cooker yet to try it but it's definitely on my DIY to-do list.


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