Ss Brewing Technologies Giveaway!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing > Do Not Fear All-Grain Brewing - A Primer
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 06-01-2011, 09:14 PM   #31
1ratdog
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: nuremberg, PA
Posts: 313
Liked 6 Times on 5 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

nice write up. im taking the AG leap soon

__________________

primary-thomas jefferson ale, cali common, mild ale
secondary-imperial mild, oatmeal stout
bottled- whiskey stout
1ratdog is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-01-2011, 09:59 PM   #32
Komodo
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Komodo's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Bloomington, IN
Posts: 302
Liked 17 Times on 15 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

Back when I used to brew iI did fly sparge. Now as I get back into it, I'm reexamining every single part of the process, using all new gear from the ground up - with the goal of the simplest, smallest and most effective brewing I can do.

For me, the BIAB mashtun/batch sparge, then move the bag to the boil kettle for dunk sparge is so perfect I can't wait to do it.

__________________
Komodo is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-01-2011, 10:20 PM   #33
supermoth
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Oakland, CA
Posts: 244
Liked 15 Times on 11 Posts
Likes Given: 10

Default

This is a great writeup, and very timely for me. I've been having maddening inconsistencies with hitting my mash temps--one day it's spot on and another day I fight it for 15 minutes. As you call it, the "dump and pray". I'm brewing tomorrow and have been mulling over ways to get a better result and all of a sudden, no searching, here's your thread! Thanks, you answered my questions that I didn't even have to ask! Cheers!

__________________
supermoth is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-14-2011, 02:38 AM   #34
TheZymurgist
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
TheZymurgist's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Georgia
Posts: 1,024
Liked 153 Times on 122 Posts
Likes Given: 402

Default

Awesome writeup. I'm trying my first AG batch this weekend, and this is definitely the process I'm going to use. Thanks!

__________________
TheZymurgist is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-14-2011, 02:28 PM   #35
BlackJaqueJanaviac
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Wisconsin Rapids, WI
Posts: 161
Liked 4 Times on 4 Posts

Default

Before launching into a project I try to get a handle on "cost of failure." In other words what will this project cost me if I totally fail and have to dump the beer.

I got in to all grain after brewing only ONE BATCH of extract beer. The reason I did was I learned that the only extra equipment I needed would cost about $20.

30" braided stainless supply line = $12
Brass plug = $2.50
Stainless hose clamps = $2
Poly tubing = $3 - $4

I already had a 48 qt cooler that had a drain plug. Since you don't make any permanent modifications to the cooler, if the project fails you remove the poly tubing and you've got your cooler back.

Of course you have to add the cost of the grains, hops, & yeast in to the cost of failure.

So the worst cast scenario is utter failure to brew a drinkable beer. And that cost would be about $40. So why would all-grain be so scary?

__________________
BlackJaqueJanaviac is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-14-2011, 03:12 PM   #36
bobbytuck
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Chicago
Posts: 203
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts

Default

When I did AG in my original cooler setup, I found that thinner mashes (1.8 to 2qt/lb) were much easier to deal with. I know there's always a debate about mash thickness, but I've since found that thin mashes -- and always using rice hulls in every batch -- led to greater efficiency, more consistent mash temp throughout, and zero stuck sparges.

The downside to thin mashes, of course, is the size of the mashing vessel. On big brews, I was forced to mash thick -- and this usually meant (for me, at least) headaches -- including inconsistent mash temp throughout the grain.

Don't want to hijack the thread, but I thought I'd throw that in. Great write-up!

__________________
bobbytuck is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-14-2011, 04:10 PM   #37
jfowler1
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 506
Liked 31 Times on 25 Posts
Likes Given: 3

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by bobbytuck View Post
When I did AG in my original cooler setup, I found that thinner mashes (1.8 to 2qt/lb) were much easier to deal with. I know there's always a debate about mash thickness, but I've since found that thin mashes -- and always using rice hulls in every batch -- led to greater efficiency, more consistent mash temp throughout, and zero stuck sparges.
Yeah, I'll go with that.

I believe that I have heard that a thinner mash may promote a higher efficiency. I also believe I have heard the trade off is a slower conversion from starch to sugar, because there is literally more volume that the enzymes need to search through. You can still get full conversion, but I think that it may take a little longer. How much more efficiency or how much longer to conversion....well, that I can't answer.

As I said in the original post, I only see mash thickness as a constraint to your tun volume - you also eluded to this when you talked about using a big grain bill. The practical differences between 1:1 and 2:1 are pretty negligable, and almost everyone is operating somewhere in that range. My point was only that it is not something to obsess over or get stressed out about deviating from. Your mash thickness is a variable, your tun size is not.

Personally, I have gone as thick as 1:1 in my 5 gallon cooler, and since correcting my crush, dialing in a run-off speed, and switching from a manifold to a false bottom, I have not had any stuck sparge issues either. Even with a mash on the thicker side of the spectrum, I can run an automated recirc with no problems. I would prefer to be in the 1.25:1 range for everything, but some recipes just don't allow it. Fluid dynamics are very system dependent, and what works great for one person can be an epic failure for someone else.

Regardless, I think it is awesome that you have dialed in some techniques that make your brew day easier and more repeatable. That is the name of the game. I am sure that if someone has been struggling with a thick mash, your suggestion to try thinning things out could be a great tip.

Thanks for contributing,

Joe
__________________
jfowler1 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-14-2011, 11:43 PM   #38
g-star
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: PA
Posts: 676
Liked 73 Times on 57 Posts
Likes Given: 12

Default

Nice write up. I can only speak from my experience, but by plugging my system (10 gal round cooler with SS braid) into BeerSmith, I never have to "dump and pray". I follow the directions and hit my mash temps dead on every time, without fail. I also hit my pre-boil and pitching gravities dead on 9 out of 10 times without thinking about it.

The $20 for good brewing software us the best investment I've made as a home brewer. If you know your system, it works great and you don't have to sweat this kind of stuff.

*shrug*

__________________
g-star is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-15-2011, 01:42 AM   #39
rjschroed
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Perrysburg, Ohio
Posts: 256
Liked 4 Times on 4 Posts
Likes Given: 5

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jfowler1 View Post
All of my recipes are built for 75% efficiency. That was not originally my target, but 75% became the trend I saw once I settled into a brewing process I was comfortable with. IMO, a "target" is actually a pretty silly thing to have had in the first place. It is my philosophy now to let your process dictate your efficiency, and not to let efficiency dictate your process. Think about that for a second.

Also, if the process is repeatable, the efficiency is repeatable. I know I mentioned this in the primer, but you don't need it to be a high number, you need it to be a consistent number.

Joe
I love the idea of this. I swear by the same philosophy. I just wanted to let you know how great of a write up I thought this was and add a couple of points. I discovered the under shoot your temp and add hot water method and how great it works the first time I did a double infusion mash. Since I didn't really care what the volume was and in a 10 gallon cooler I'm not usually limited I just used my software to get me in the ball park. stopped short of that volume and then added until I got to the correct mash temp. It works really slick. Also, as someone who batch sparges what I can tell you is that there really isn't any reason to over sparge and leave anything in your mash tun. Since we drain our tuns completely after the mash when we batch sparge we can then measure how much wort we have collected and calculate how much water to sparge with. For example, let's say I mash with 16qts of water and collect 2.5 gallons. to hit a pre boil volume of 6.5 I need to sparge with 4 gallons (break it up however you like.). Since you don't need to calculate your dead space to sparge (it's filled with wort from the mash) this should work everytime. What you suggested is great advice but the thought of leaving wort in the mash tun makes me cringe. I'll tell you this though, I'd rather collect a little extra and boil it off than be under personally.

Oh yeah, Prosted!
__________________
rjschroed is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-15-2011, 01:51 AM   #40
rjschroed
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Perrysburg, Ohio
Posts: 256
Liked 4 Times on 4 Posts
Likes Given: 5

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by g-star View Post
Nice write up. I can only speak from my experience, but by plugging my system (10 gal round cooler with SS braid) into BeerSmith, I never have to "dump and pray". I follow the directions and hit my mash temps dead on every time, without fail. I also hit my pre-boil and pitching gravities dead on 9 out of 10 times without thinking about it.

The $20 for good brewing software us the best investment I've made as a home brewer. If you know your system, it works great and you don't have to sweat this kind of stuff.

*shrug*
Beersmith is always technically correct, the problem is we don't live in a technically correct world. The OP actually points this out when he states something about temp dropping a few degrees more while transferring on a cool day compared to a warm day. That being said, when I was fooling around with beersmith 2.0 I thought I remember seeing an option to input ambient air temp. but I never used it because it's just as easy to stop short and fill until I hit my mash temp.
__________________
rjschroed is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
All Grain Primer Article and Videos Bobby_M All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 17 07-16-2011 02:54 AM
Adding 1lbs of 2 Row for the fear of poor crush stagstout All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 10 05-07-2010 02:33 AM
Irrational fear of the bogeyman? shecky All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 8 07-15-2009 02:39 AM
Thermometer Hell: Fear and Loathing 1st AG njnear76 All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 4 12-29-2007 06:26 PM
Grain Primer for Dummies? SwAMi75 All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 9 04-05-2005 04:12 AM