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Old 12-07-2006, 02:38 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Baron von BeeGee
Well, I should have known that since I'm a Noonanite!

Yeah, how did you miss that? Even I knew that, and I'm not even an Nooanian acolyte yet!


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Old 12-07-2006, 02:50 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chairman Cheyco
Yeah, how did you miss that? Even I knew that, and I'm not even an Nooanian acolyte yet!


No hiss followed by a strange powdery substance came out of that package I sent?
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Old 12-07-2006, 02:37 PM   #13
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Great article wild.

I guess it really doesn't matter what type barley is used for home brew as long as it fits with the type beer you are trying to brew, such as ale lager or stout. That really simplifies things for me. I suppose I will start with the cheapest variety and experiment from there. No sense learning to play golf with a $2000 set of Pings in other words.

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Old 12-07-2006, 09:24 PM   #14
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To use your analogy don't think of it as golf clubs think of it as golf balls, they are not durable goods. Would you recommend someone start playing on the course with range balls or relatively inexpensive Titleist or Nike balls?

I'd suggest brewing a few proven AG recipes using the recommended malts (almost always 2-row) first. This will give you a basis for comparison using more common ingredients.

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Old 12-08-2006, 10:09 PM   #15
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“I suppose I will start with the cheapest variety and experiment from there. No sense learning to play golf with a $2000 set of Pings in other words.”

As a far better chef than I once said: if you start with great ingredients, it is much easier to get great results.

Get a good bag of Bries, Gambrinous, or other name brand, and brew some good beer.

Or maybe even great beer.

If you need to get it for less money, look around for a homebrew club near you, almost always they’ll know where to get the best value. We went from over $38 per bag to now $22.50. it keeps very well as long as you keep it cool and dry.
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Old 12-09-2006, 08:19 PM   #16
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I think I will try the all grain kits from Midwest for a while and get used to the process. Then maybe that would be a good time to experiment with individual ingredients. I am trying to put together my equipment and dont want to make costly mistakes with grain before I have worked out the kinks in my process first.

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Old 12-09-2006, 08:47 PM   #17
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It's cheaper to make mistakes with grain than it is with extract.

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Old 12-09-2006, 11:44 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dcarter
I think I will try the all grain kits from Midwest for a while and get used to the process. Then maybe that would be a good time to experiment with individual ingredients.
Excellent idea. You know you'll have good ingredients and a good recipe, you can concentrate on your technique without worrying about the other parts of the equation.
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Old 12-10-2006, 12:06 AM   #19
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I decided that I needed to get into all grain even after only four batches of extract brewing. The extracts simply don't allow for enough experimentation for my taste. They also are hardly ever "hoppy" enough for my taste.

I am very excited to get started with AG and should have all of my equipment ready for the new year. As far as grain types, I would like to find a good recipe for pale ale and then buy 50 pounds of the required grain and brew up as much as I can, then move on to an new recipe. It seems like the most economical way to brew good beer.

Can anyone tell me how long crushed grain will last before it goes stale? Can you freeze it without introducing off flavors? All tips and tricks are appreciated and will probably at least be tried once.

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Old 12-10-2006, 10:32 PM   #20
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Srore your grain cool and dry. Freezing it may introduce moisture into the grain.
Crushed grain should be used up within a month IMO.

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