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-   -   differences in grain types (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f36/differences-grain-types-17396/)

dcarter 12-06-2006 02:54 AM

differences in grain types
 
Can anyone tell me the difference in 2 row american and 4 row american barley?

Baron von BeeGee 12-06-2006 02:59 AM

I've never heard of 4-row. 2-row has two rows of heads while 6-row has six rows of heads. From a brewer's standpoing, 6-row has more diastatic power than 2-row (more enzymes to aid in conversion) but 2-row is considered to have a fuller, maltier taste.

Some good reading is available on the web:
http://byo.com/mrwizard/872.html

the_bird 12-06-2006 03:00 AM

Under what circumstances is the use of 6-row (instead of 2-row) generally called for?

Baron von BeeGee 12-06-2006 03:02 AM

I've never used 6-row before, so can't say based on experience. I think some people like the grainier flavor that 6-row provides and it may also be advantageous when mashing large amounts of adjuncts (think BMC and rice) due to its high diastatic power.

dcarter 12-06-2006 03:04 AM

Sorry bird, I meant 6 row. So the difference is that it is a different strain of the same species of barley? It would seem that either variety would make a good standard ale then right?

the_bird 12-06-2006 03:06 AM

I'll defer to the experts, but aren't there some other differences, like protein content? Can you still do a standard single-step infusion mash with 6-row?

dcarter 12-06-2006 03:09 AM

By the way, the coopers cervesa that I made last was terrible. Way to sweet with no hoppiness at all. I may have bottled to soon since it tastes so malty but I was dissapointed anyway. I have a coopers stout in secondary right now and plan to do an all grain red ale at Christmas then I will start using the american 2 row it seems. I want to make a good APA. Any tips would be appreciated. Thanks guys and thanks Barron von Bee Gee.

wild 12-06-2006 06:28 AM

Try a read on the article about the differences between the two.

Wild

boo boo 12-06-2006 10:36 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Baron von BeeGee
I've never heard of 4-row. 2-row has two rows of heads while 6-row has six rows of heads. From a brewer's standpoing, 6-row has more diastatic power than 2-row (more enzymes to aid in conversion) but 2-row is considered to have a fuller, maltier taste.

Some good reading is available on the web:
http://byo.com/mrwizard/872.html

4 row barley is still grown and malted in northern europe, where it is prized for its hardiness in the cold climate. It is not widely used elsewhere due to its steeliness and low yeild. It is actually a six row barley that appears to have 4 rows because of its thin elongated head.

This according to Noonan in New Brewing Lager Beer.:)

Baron von BeeGee 12-07-2006 01:21 AM

Well, I should have known that since I'm a Noonanite!


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