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Old 06-19-2008, 06:45 PM   #61
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my decoction doesn't take all that much longer than a single infusion. I do double decoctions and push the whole mash time out to 90 minutes from the initial infusion. Cleanup is maybe a tad longer with the extra pots.

Anyway, an electrician finished wiring my smooth-top cooktop out in my garage (it was free, unused top of the line one also!). Now I'll infuse and decoct using that and then go to propane for the boil.

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Old 07-07-2008, 01:24 AM   #62
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Just finished mashing my first Enhanced Triple Decoction... 104, (122,) 140, 158, 170. This video really helped. Hopefully the taste will be proportional to the time and effort put into this... my first Doppelbock.

Now that I know I can pull off a decoction mash, I know I will use it for my home-grown malt. Thanks Kaiser.

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Old 08-09-2008, 04:16 PM   #63
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To do or not to do the decoction? Check this thread:

http://www.beertools.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=950

Back in 1989, I did a bunch of experiments with American and British fully modified malts in both infusion and decoction mash regemins as well as "fully modified" European malts (which are typically less modified than their British and American counterparts)and compared the results among 10 BJCP judges. All grists, hops and yeast used were the same with the exception being the base malts.

The concensus was that the technique was wasted on the British and American malts, but was noticable when used with the Euro. malts. We also mashed with undermodified malts: Budvar and Gamb. Czech Pilsen. Of course, these malts require decoction. The overall flavor favorites came from the Euro. and undermodified mashes.

Now the decision to decoct or not comes down to a law of diminishing returns.... were the favorites 50% better? NO ! More like 5-10% better. But the input labor and hassle was over 150% more! It is also messy and requires more equipment. Fun to play with, but not something I would do all the time !

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Old 08-09-2008, 06:19 PM   #64
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Originally Posted by Piotr View Post
To do or not to do the decoction? Check this thread:
You touched on one of the big debates in home brewing these days. Especially since the vast majority of German beers, that you can get here and are sold in Germany and not decocted anymore yet still ave that "German" taste.

My opinion is that every brewer should see for himself.

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Old 08-09-2008, 06:25 PM   #65
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German beers take on a gourmet feeling and taste when decoction is used I think.

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Old 11-06-2008, 07:13 PM   #66
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Do you sparge the decoction grists like any other AG method, using the ratio 2 quarters per pound ,or not?

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Old 11-06-2008, 08:40 PM   #67
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DonArmando View Post
Do you sparge the decoction grists like any other AG method, using the ratio 2 quarters per pound ,or not?
The decoction process is separate from sparging so you would just use whatever your normal method is.
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Old 11-07-2008, 04:01 AM   #68
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Do you sparge the decoction grists like any other AG method, using the ratio 2 quarters per pound ,or not?
Yes, you sparge like any other AG method. Like Brad said, it is separate from the mashing itself. The amount of water needed for the sparge depends on your pre-boil volume target. Given than decoction mashes are generally thinner (3.5 - 4.5 l/kg or 1.75-2.25 qt/lb) I'd expect that you end up using less sparge water. One rule of thumb I read in an old German brewing text was that mashing uses 2/3 of the water needed for brewing and sparging the other 3rd.

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Old 11-07-2008, 01:07 PM   #69
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Quote:
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Especially since the vast majority of German beers, that you can get here and are sold in Germany and not decocted anymore yet still ave that "German" taste.
So what are they doing exactly? Plain ol' single infusion?... A step mash with roughly the same temperature schedules (to fit the malt, of course) as a decoction mash? Any special technique in the mash, lauter, or boil?
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Old 11-07-2008, 03:49 PM   #70
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So what are they doing exactly?
This is the "workhorse" mash in German brewing today:

dough-in above 57C or directly at 62-63C
63C for 30 - 40 min (maltose rest)
(65 C for ~30 min if very high fermentability is desired)
68-72C for 20 - 60 min (dextrinization rest)
76-78C - mash-out.

The whole mash takes 90 - 120 min.

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