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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing > Dechutes black butte porter clone water profile question
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Old 09-23-2013, 02:43 AM   #1
corrales_305
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Default Dechutes black butte porter clone water profile question

I am on my second all grain beer and was wonder about water chemistry. I have read that different type of beer require different water profile. I ve read a bit and all I got is a headache in return. I just wanna know what addition I should put in,if any. I'm using r/o water. Trying to make a porter clone from the jamil show. 5 gal batch. Don't need to know to much science behind it just how many grams of calcium chloride or gypsum or whatever to add. Thank you for your help guys

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Old 09-23-2013, 10:45 AM   #2
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There is a sticky in the brew science section on water chemistry. Don't worry it's not all math and whatnot, very simple and informative. Basically since you got RO water you're halfway there. You should start with 1 tsp. calcium chloride per 5 gallons of water used when brewing with roast malts. It's as simple as that to start and make adjustments as you feel necessary down the line. Most proclaim that these guidelines got them miles ahead as they were suggested no tweaking needed.
I've been thinking of brewing a BB porter clone for a while now. Any chance you could post the recipe?

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Old 09-23-2013, 05:42 PM   #3
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thanks for the info that's what ill do.
http://http://brewblog.beerbarons.or...r=kmegal&id=83




Malts and Grains


10.58 pounds
American Pale Malt (2-Row)





76% of grist
1.39 pounds
German Wheat Malt Light





10% of grist
0.70 pounds
Crystal Malt 80L





5% of grist
0.42 pounds
British Dextrin (Cara-Pils) Malt





3% of grist
0.42 pounds
American Chocolate Malt





3% of grist
0.42 pounds
British Chocolate Malt





3% of grist
13.93 pounds
Total Grain Weight (Water Amounts












) 100% of grist

Non-Fermentables


1 tsp. Irish Moss @ 15 minutes

Reference

Hops


0.60 ounces
Galena
13% Pellets @ 90 minutes

0.25 ounces
Cascade
5.5% Pellets @ 30 minutes
Type: Bittering
Use: Boil 1.4 AAUs


0.25 ounces
Mount Hood
6% Pellets @ 5 minutes
Type: Aroma
Use: Boil 1.5 AAUs
1.10 ounces Total Hop Weight 10.7 AAUs

Boil


Total Boil Time: 90 minutes

Reference

Yeast


Name: English Ale
Manufacturer: White Labs
Product ID: WLP002

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Old 09-23-2013, 09:40 PM   #4
DSmith
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I brewed this recipe and mashed with water with residual alkalinity (CaCO3) of 100 ppm resulted in a room temperature mash pH of 5.46 after 15 minutes of mashing. The batch spage was 100% RO, but the mash water used some of my high alkalinity tap water mixed with RO to keep the pH from going too low. All water was also treated with 0.5 grams of CaCl2/gal.

Look into the EZ Water Calculator Spreadsheet or Brun Water spreadsheet. 100% RO water could result in a low mash pH for this grainbill.

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Old 09-24-2013, 07:53 PM   #5
corrales_305
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I looked at the calculators but I don't know exactly what is in my r/o water I get at one of those glacier machine at the market. I know its Houston, TX water fed into the machine, but that's all. I don't know how much there r/o membrane and carbon filter removes. I also don't have anyway to measure ph. A meter is out of my budget for now and the strips don't work properly. So I guess just adding in a tsp calcium chloride for five gal batch will have to do for now unless there is something else I can do without a water report or a ph meter.

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Old 09-24-2013, 08:13 PM   #6
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Here is a thread on Houston water from a google search:

http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f12/hous...profile-29196/

A grocery store RO machine can be 90-95% affective. It's ok to assume RO water is 0 for all concentrations.

Based on the Houston water thread, I think you should use 75% RO water + 25% tap water for the mash, 100% RO water for the sparge, and treated all the water with 1 tsp CaCl2 for every 5 gallons of water used. Don't just add the CaCl2 to the boil kettle. Add the portion you need to the mash water you need, and the rest could be added to either the spage water or boil kettle.

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Old 09-27-2013, 04:37 PM   #7
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thanks for the simple info guys....I did what you guys suggested and I tasted the beer today(less than a week)..I don't know if its the recipe, the water additions, that its an all grain batch and im used to extract which sucks, or that I've invested in temp control thermostat for my fermentation temp to be just right, but this is the best beer ive ever brewed. I have been home brewing for 2 yrs (mostly extract) and always found some off flavor or bitter taste in my beers that would eventually get a lot better with time a month or so minimum. This beer on the other hand, I would say Is drinkable right now almost. I can imagine how it will taste in a month...probably the best beer ever!!! I'm a happy brewer right now. again thank for the advice

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