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Old 09-17-2008, 05:54 AM   #21
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who cares about the cost, the QUALITY goes up exponentially.

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Old 09-17-2008, 01:39 PM   #22
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For me, it's a hands on thing. I get to pick and choose the quality of my ingredients, what exact body I want from the beer by mash temp, and get to have multiple nifty items that I wouldn't need otherwise.

I enjoy the DIY nature of AG brewing as much or more than the consumption part.

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Old 09-18-2008, 12:44 AM   #23
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I'm currently living in S. Korea, the land where the beer sucks and homebrew isn't cheap. It costs me $60 or so to brew a 5gal. batch (partial mash). Definitely not cheap....brings a tear to my eye to read how cheap it is at home!! But its fun and my beer is MUCH better than S. Korean beer, so continue I will!!!

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Old 09-18-2008, 04:47 AM   #24
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I've always wanted to switch to AG, but I really don't have the room. A partial mash costs me at least $30 CAD (if I'm lucky) for a 23-30L batch, but it usually costs me about $40 CAD. It's the DME that gets you, They make it cost twice more than grains.

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Old 09-20-2008, 04:23 AM   #25
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Besides the product being far superior, it becomes much more of a craft to brew AG. Especially when you design your own recipes. Using brew software such as Beersmith to tweak your recipes saves a lot of time and work. Also, the time it takes to brew a batch gets progressivly shorter the more you do it (to a point) because you get to know your equipment/process. If I prepare the night before, I can start at 7 or 8am on a weekend and be done by lunch time including cleanup. That still leaves almost the whole day for SWMBO and kids.

I just bought a 6-pack of SNPA (it keeps me in perspective) and it was $8.99. Using a local bulk malt supplier, I can brew 5gal of just about anything for $8-$15 (depending on style). But Ya know what? I would still brew if it cost twice that because it's fun and the product is well worth it. I'm gearing up for 10gal batches because my friends/neighbors and I go through 5gals too fast!!

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Old 09-20-2008, 12:58 PM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by celtic_man81 View Post
I've always wanted to switch to AG, but I really don't have the room. A partial mash costs me at least $30 CAD (if I'm lucky) for a 23-30L batch, but it usually costs me about $40 CAD. It's the DME that gets you, They make it cost twice more than grains.
You may want to convert to all grain using the Brew in a Bag technique. No additional equipment other than a cake rack (pseudo false bottom for you kettle) and a polyester bag. Very popular in Australia and claim is you can convert to all grain for about 10 bucks.

Paul
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Old 09-20-2008, 01:26 PM   #27
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I noticed an immediate reduction in ingredient prices when I went to all-grain, and that was even when I purchased some recipe kits that had all the various grains pre-crushed and mixed in a big bag (you pay a bit more for that convenience). Then I went to whole (uncrushed) grains and the price went down even more. Then I said screw the kits, I'm making my own recipes, and the price went down in some cases, and up slightly in others (when I had to buy several small quantities of various grains to make a recipe--the homebrew supply folks buy all their grains in bulk so it's cheaper for them to add a little of this and a little of that.)

Now I'm at the point where I buy 50# sacks of pale 2-row malt, which comes out under $1/lb. It's an extremely versatile malt and it makes up 60-80% of most of my grain bills. Another grain I use a lot of is Crystal/Caramel 40L malt. I'm buying that one in 5# or 10# bags, although I occasionally need something other than 40L for my recipes. I also picked up a 10# of wheat malt since a few of my recipes call for a bit of it to aid head retention.

With all those bulk grain purchases and the cost savings associated with them, I'm usually paying just $10-15 for 90% of my malt needs, and just a few bucks per batch for other specialty malts that round out the recipe. I did an IPA a couple weeks ago, and even with all that grain and all those hops, it was still cheaper than the extract hefeweizen recipe ingredients that my friend picked up for his first batch. Pretty impressive if you ask me!

So if you don't mind expanding your brew equipment considerably (mash/lauter/sparge equipment, grain mill, etc.) and expanding your brew day schedule by a few hours (usually takes me 5-6 hours from start to finished and fully cleaned up) all-grain definitely does save you money over the long-term. But of course when you add up the equipment costs associated with it, it will take many batches to reach the break-even point, so don't expect to have a windfall of cash over the first month or two.

IMO, all things considered, it's totally worth it.

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Old 09-22-2008, 03:55 AM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LayMeister View Post
You may want to convert to all grain using the Brew in a Bag technique. No additional equipment other than a cake rack (pseudo false bottom for you kettle) and a polyester bag. Very popular in Australia and claim is you can convert to all grain for about 10 bucks.

Paul
wow that brew in a bag looks awesome ! It defiantly removes MOST of the PITA steps involved with AG...

But it still requires a gigantic boiling pot, and a DECENT size burner to say the least... where do you guys get yours ??
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Old 09-22-2008, 04:19 AM   #29
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If you are seriously wanting to go AG. Then i would start trying to fit the extra 2 hours it takes to do, in your busy life.

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Old 05-15-2009, 08:30 PM   #30
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I brew with extract and I buy the bulky 33 pound growler of extract syrup for $70.00. I get five, 5 gallon batches out of it. My grains are bought in 2 -3 pound bags from the local hb store as well as the hops and yeast. I round it off to about $10.50 per case of beer. I never tasted an all grain beer, but my beers are pretty darn good. Especially, my clean out the grains drawer "**** crick ale." Is an all grain that much better tasting?
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