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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing > Cheapest source of corn?
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Old 01-30-2013, 06:33 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by william_shakes_beer View Post
The purpose of the mash is to convert starch to sugar. If its already fermentable sugar, (corn surup) enzyme action is not required. Just toss it into the boil. No?
Well not the way I read it

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Corn syrup is a food syrup, which is made from the starch of maize and contains varying amounts of maltose and higher oligosaccharides, depending on the grade. Corn syrup is used in foods to soften texture, add volume, prevent crystallization of sugar, and enhance flavor. Corn syrup is distinct from high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS), which is created when corn syrup undergoes enzymatic processing, producing a sweeter compound that contains higher levels of fructose.
Corn syrup is different from HFCS syrup in that HFCS undergoes the enzymatic processing and could be used just dumped in the boil. But corn syrup would need to be cereal mashed and then mashed with some base grain that had the proper enzymes to convert it.

I have to say I have really enjoyed reading up about this whole thing and have a couple of ideas now for a brew using store bought stuff
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Old 01-30-2013, 10:57 PM   #22
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Ask Tickle! He probably has some extra corn sacks lying around since his still got whacked with an ax!😄

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Old 01-31-2013, 12:21 AM   #23
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Ask Tickle! He probably has some extra corn sacks lying around since his still got whacked with an ax!dde04
Does that count as taking about distillation?

Mods; strike him roughly and throw him to the ground!
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Old 01-31-2013, 04:16 PM   #24
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I wonder what would the PPG be on cornstarch?

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Old 01-31-2013, 04:18 PM   #25
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I wonder what would the PPG be on cornstarch?
I am thinking stuck sparges with corn starch. That stuff is pure flour
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Old 01-31-2013, 07:03 PM   #26
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No, that's a myth that has been proven to be historically inaccurate.

In order to use those adjuncts you have to process them separately from the rest of the mash, and then add it to the mash. You either have to do a cereal mash to pr-gelatinize them or you have to roll them with heat to make them flaked (the flaked corn you're referring to)...either way, besides the labor and energy involved to grow and harvest those plants, you expend labor and energy to make them usuable. You have to boil them in a cereal mash. That's another couple hours of labor and energy involved in the cost of the product. Same with making the HFCS ad rice syrup solids they use today....It still has to be processed before it makes it to the beer.

Maureen Ogle proved in Ambitious Brew, that when AH released Budweiser with it's corn and rice adjuncts in the 1860's it was the most expensive beer out there; a single bottle retailed for $1.00 (what would equal in today's Dollars for $17.00) this was quite difference when a schooner of beer usually cost a nickel.

Corn wasn't used to "save money" or "cut costs" like so many beersnobs like to think to make them feel superior to bmc drinkers. It was done because heavy beers (both english style Ales and the heavier Bavarian malty beers) were not being drunk by American consumers any more. Beer initally was seen around the world as food (some even called it liquid bread), but since America, even in the 1800's was a prosperous nation compared to the rest of the world, and americans ate meat with nearly every meal, heavy beers had fallen out of favor...

And American 6-row Barley just made for heavy, hazy beer.

Bush and other German Brewers started looking at other styles of Beers, and came upon Karl Balling and Anton Schwartz's work at the Prague Polytechnic Institute with the Brewers in Bohemia who when faced with a grain shortage started using adjuncts, which produced the pils which was light, sparkly and fruity tasting...just the thing for American tastebuds.

So the brewers brought Schwartz to America where he went to work for American Brewer Magazine writing articles and technical monographs, teaching American brewers how to use Rice and Corn...
Now I remember why I come here

Lets see if I have it right;

Adjuncts other than barley, in this case corn, needs to be boiled to gelatanize the starch before being added to the mash. Furthermore, they need to be mashed with base malt to acheive conversion

Quick oats,Flaked oats, or instant oat meal: Already cooked, just add to mash

Steel cut, rolled or "old fashion oats are raw oats and need to be boiled prior to mash.

Grits: essentially coarse ground corn, needs to be boiled before mash, and needs to be mashed with base malt to convert

feed corn; needs to be ground, then treated like grits above

Flaked corn, instant grits; already converted, just toss into the mash

Did i pass the exam?
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Old 01-31-2013, 07:27 PM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by william_shakes_beer



Flaked corn, instant grits; already converted, just toss into the mash

Did i pass the exam?
Close - I think you mean already Gelatinized. These all still need to be acted upon by enzymes in the mash.


Other than that - A+
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Old 02-10-2013, 04:18 PM   #28
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Thanks a lot guys, you just saved me a trip to Annapolis. I had all the ingredients for a brew I wanted to make except flaked corn.

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